How To Replant A Succulent

From the leaves of Crassula, Stapelia, Opuntia, Graptopetalum, Sedum, and Sansevieria, many new plants can be quickly developed. Because the tips of some unusual varieties of Kalanchoe’s long, succulent leaves frequently have little, mature plants sprouting on them, they are known as “mother of thousands.”

Simply break off mature, full leaves and tuck them stem-tip down into potting soil that has good drainage. Each will begin to sprout new plants in a few weeks if kept moist but not soggy.

Can you prune a succulent and plant it again?

Because succulents are such hardy plants, you can actually plant a piece of one and it will develop into a new plant. It may sound like a horror film or the premise of an upcoming science fiction drama on Netflix, but it’s truly possible to regenerate something new from a severed limb. Even if one of its branches is cut off, they will still manage to survive.

Yes, you can prune or cut off a section of a succulent and plant it elsewhere. The clipped succulent piece will adapt to its new home and develop into a full-fledged succulent with the right growing circumstances.

If you want to learn more about pruning succulents, keep reading. It’s like getting numerous plants for the price of one if you get the technique down!

How may succulents be replanted without getting them sick?

Select a container that is roughly 10% larger than your succulent. Avoid choosing a pot that is too large as it can startle them. Additionally, because they hold more water, your succulents may become overwatered if they remain wet for an extended period of time.

This step is not required. There is no need to cover the holes with such materials if the pot is very porous and has good drainage holes that still permit water to travel through them.

In the bottom of your new pot, add one to two inches of dirt and lightly compact it around the drainage hole.

By doing this, you should avoid damaging your succulent when you repot it.

  • You can: cultivate your succulents in plastic containers;
  • Tap the bottom of the pot, then gradually slide it out: Holding your new plant firmly by the stems or leaves, turn it sideways, and tap the grow pot’s base until the plant slides out. To help your succulent escape the pot, you might also give it a little tug.
  • If you don’t need the plastic pot any more and prefer to avoid having to handle the plant too much, you may also cut the pot out using a flush cutter.
  • If your succulent is grown in clay or another material:
  • Take each stem out one at a time.
  • To avoid touching the tendrils too much while repotting the plant, wrap a cloth around it and carefully ease it out.

Before planting, use your fingers to gently loosen the roots. If the roots on your succulent are particularly thick, you can trim about an inch from the root ball and use a clean, sharp knife to cut through the knotted roots. By doing this, the dirt in the bigger pot should begin to fill with fresh root growth. Just leave it alone if the root system is modest.

Remove at least a third of the old potting soil that is surrounding the plant. As they have likely ingested a significant portion of the nutrients in the old potting mix, this should enable your succulent to receive all the nutrients it requires.

Ensure that your succulent is erect and centered in the arrangement. After that, use the new soil mixture to fill in around the rootball and gently press it down so the rootball is surrounded.

After you’ve finished repotting your succulent, give it at least a week to become used to its new surroundings before giving it a nice soak in water. Your succulents should experience less shock as a result of this.

Succulents can be repotted into bigger containers to promote new development, which will help them stay healthy and get bigger. Nevertheless, certain plants don’t like to be transplanted, so exercise caution and make sure you’re doing it at the right time.

When transplanting succulents, do you water them?

1. To get started, fill your new planter 3/4 full with pre-mixed succulent or cactus soil, which is often available at any nearby nursery or home improvement store. You can combine standard potting soil and perlite in equal amounts to try making your own soil. Make sure the planter is at least 2″ wider than the diameter of the succulent if you are relocating it to a larger container. Your succulent will have plenty of room to expand and become stable as a result.

2. Remove the succulent from its present container and gently separate the roots. To loosen the roots and remove the soil, you can “tickle” them from the bottom. Consider this phase as a pleasant stretch for the roots. They can stabilize in a larger pot and acclimate to their new soil by being spread out and lengthened. This is the ideal time to remove any dead leaves and brush away any dead roots from the plant’s base. While doing this, be careful to brush away any old or extra dirt.

3. To support the plant, dig a small hole in the fresh dirt, lay the succulent in it, and then gently cover the roots with extra potting soil. Don’t cover any leaves or allow them lay on top of the soil; only add enough to cover the plant’s base. As a result of the leaves absorbing too much moisture from the soil, this will cause them to rot.

4. After the plant has stabilized, you can add colored rocks, pebbles, or sand to give your new succulent plant in a pot a unique touch. Make sure the material drains adequately if you do add something on top so that water can reach the soil underneath.

5. In this case, the situation dictates how to water. Depending on the type of plant and when it was last watered, a succulent that has been repotted may require different first watering. However, it is typically advised to hold off on watering your succulent for at least a week following repotting. Make sure the soil is dry before giving it a good soaking without drowning it.

6. Enjoy your succulent in a new pot! Depending on your environment, sunlight, etc., water your succulent once per week to three weeks to keep it healthy. Water should be applied when the soil is dry. Leave it alone until it dries if it is still wet. They are tough little plants, so try different things to see what works best for your new addition.

To replant succulents, where do you cut them?

While the soil must remain fully dry while the cuttings callus off and develop roots, this method is perfect if you want to start your own potting nursery for numerous cuttings at once.

Spend a few weeks working on the propagation process, experimenting with different approaches, and documenting outcomes. Maintaining records in a gardening diary is an excellent idea.

An Important Note on Cactus Propagation

Succulent propagation is simple and enjoyable. You can expand your collection of these lovely creatures by beheading, dividing, or splitting leaves.

We are aware that barrel types produce individual pups that can be picked and planted. Additionally, the individual leaves of Christmas cacti can be clipped, calloused, and rooted. What about other types, such those found in columns?

Simply make an incision in the top or side of a columnar cactus and take out a portion with a diameter of about an inch. Put it somewhere dry where it won’t be disturbed, and leave it alone for a few months.

If it stays dry during this time, the cutting will callus off and start to grow roots. After that, planting is ready.

Can succulent cuttings be planted directly in the ground?

What is there to love other than a succulent? Obviously, a full garden of succulents! Fortunately for us, it’s simple to propagate a variety of these resilient, vibrant plants at home. We can’t wait to see succulents growing all year long in containers around the house and garden; there are various easy ways to reproduce them.

Propagating by Division: Plants that have gotten too leggy perform best with this method, which produces new succulents from cuttings. Start by delicately removing any leaves that may be attached to the stem below the rosette; be sure to preserve the leaf’s base while you do so. After all the leaves have been eliminated, cut the rosette with shears, leaving a brief stem intact. The cuttings should be let to dry in an empty tray for a few days until the raw ends have calloused. The cuttings can then be rooted in either water or soil.

Soil: After the stems have calloused, set the cuttings on top of a shallow tray filled with well-draining cactus/succulent soil. From the base of the cuttings, roots and little plants will start to emerge in a few weeks. Once the roots start to show, water sparingly once a week; take care not to overwater. The parent leaf will eventually wither; carefully remove it while taking care not to harm the young roots. Your propagated succulents can be replanted once they have established roots. As soon as the plants are established, keep them out of direct sunlight.

Water: After the stem has calloused, place a cutting with the end barely visible above the water’s surface on the lip of a glass or jar filled with water. Pick a sunny location for your glass. The incision will eventually produce roots that extend toward the water. Once roots have sprouted, your new succulent can either be replanted in succulent potting soil or allowed to remain submerged in water as illustrated above.

Offsets are little plants that develop at the base of the main specimen, and many species of succulents, such as aloe, hens and chicks, and some cacti, will generate them. Check for root growth after an offset has developed for two to three weeks before carefully twisting, cutting, or using a sharp knife to separate it from the main stem. Be cautious to prevent destroying any already-formed roots. Follow the directions above for propagating in soil or water, letting the offsets dry, establish roots, and then repot when they have had time to callus any exposed regions. Removing offsets has the added benefit of enhancing the health of your current succulents and redirecting energy into the growth of the primary plant.

Succulents may be repotted in ordinary potting soil, right?

I’ll address some of the most prevalent queries concerning succulent soil in this section. Ask your question in the comments section below if you can’t find it here.

Can you use regular potting soil for succulents?

For succulents, you could probably use ordinary potting soil. It might work quite well, especially if you frequently forget to water your plants or if they are small. However, make sure the soil thoroughly dries out in between waterings to prevent them from rotting.

What happens if you plant succulents in regular potting soil?

Succulents planted in normal potting soil run the danger of being overwatered. Your succulents may quickly decay if the soil absorbs too much moisture.

What is the difference between potting soil and succulent soil?

The components and consistency of succulent soil and regular potting soil are different. Succulent dirt is permeable and created to drain very rapidly, unlike regular potting soil, which is composed of organic ingredients that hold onto moisture.

Making my own potting soil helps me save a ton of money, plus my succulents thrive in it. Your succulents will flourish now that you are aware of the ideal soil to use and have my formula for creating your own.

Do succulents require sunlight?

Depending on the type, succulents need six hours of sunlight each day because they are light-loving plants. You might need to gradually expose newly planted succulents to full sun exposure or give shade with a translucent screen because they can burn in direct sunshine.

How are succulents moved into pots?

Begin by tilting the plant sideways and snatching it by the stem base. Shake the container a little after giving it a little tap on the bottom. The plant can also be removed from its previous pot by gently pulling on the stem after loosening the soil with a stick or your hands. Chopsticks can be used to further loosen the dirt if you are still unable to remove the succulent after doing so.

Instead, you can slowly hammer the old pot until it breaks. This would enable you to take the plant out of its old pot without damaging its root system, even though you would be sacrificing it.

After removing the succulents from the old pot, you should just brush the soil away from the roots or give them a light tap or tickle to loosen as much soil as you can. If you decide to wash the roots with water, be careful to allow them to dry for three to five days in a cool location out of the sun. If the roots of your succulents have grown too long, you can also clip them.

Fill the new pot with soil mixture by at least two-thirds before you plant your succulent. Once finished, carefully lay the succulent in the center and completely cover the roots with additional soil. To keep the succulent’s leaves from rotting, make sure they are entirely above the soil.

Place the succulent gently in the center and completely encircle the roots with additional soil.

If you want to repot a cactus, follow the same procedures as above. To prevent getting pricked by the thorns, just be sure to use a kitchen tong or wear gloves, such as gardening gloves, work gloves, or leather gloves, before you carry out the next tasks.

On the other side, repotting succulent arrangements is fairly challenging. However, to make things simpler, carefully remove each plant from its previous pot, taking care not to damage any of the roots. To accomplish this, make cuts through the soil and roots, then scrape off as much of the old dirt as you can from the roots. When you’re finished, carefully examine your succulents’ roots before putting them in their new pot. Make careful to leave any plants with damaged roots out of the pot for two to three days, or until the roots callus over, if you notice any.