How To Propagate Large Succulents

  • slicing shears
  • gardening mitts (for handling spiny varieties)
  • a little trowel
  • potting soil for cacti and succulents
  • jars with sufficient drainage holes

Remove Some Leaves or Behead

Take a few leaves at random from your succulent plant, gently twisting each one off the stem without breaking it.

These can be cut off the bottom of the stem, which will be discarded, when it begins to grow lanky.

To remove a specific leaf from a plant, such as a Christmas cactus, you might need to use scissors.

If you’re “beheading,” cut the stem of the plant head cleanly with your scissors or clippers about an inch below the lower leaves.

Plant

When roots start to form, either choose a site in your garden that is ideal for planting or fill well-draining containers of your choosing with potting material.

Sunshine and well-drained soil are ideal for succulent growth. They get paler in the absence of sunlight, and they decompose in excess moisture.

When the sun is less powerful, such as in the early morning or late afternoon, plant in a sunny location.

To lift the cuttings above the edge of your container or garden surface, pile dirt higher. To stabilize the roots, gently tamp the earth down; do not water.

Water and Feed

It’s time to buy a succulent/cactus food at this stage, such as Miracle-Gro Succulent Plant Food, which is sold on Amazon. administer as directed by the manufacturer.

Succulents can also be propagated via cuttings that are placed on top of potting soil and allowed to callus off so they can root themselves in the soil.

How can you root succulents the quickest?

So, you may be wondering how to quickly propagate succulents. I can relate to both the joy and frustration of watching a new plant develop.

Since I’ve been growing succulents for a few years, allow me to give you some advice on how to quickly propagate your succulents as well as some alternative techniques you can try.

Stem cuttings are the simplest and quickest method of propagating succulents. If the plant is a fresh cutting from the mother plant, it will already have a strong foundation from which to build its new root system. Another instance is when you cut off the succulent’s top portion because it has been stretched out significantly (etiolation), this stem will likewise give rise to numerous new plantlings (pups). Due to its existing root system, the plant will also have a great possibility of producing more offset and growing quickly.

Always check that the stem cuttings are a respectable size for the plant’s typical size.

According to my experience, I always want to make sure that the succulent has a lot of nodes where the leaves attach to the stem and a lot of leaves in its stem. Once the succulent is put in soil, these stem nodes will form roots, and the leaves will serve as the succulent’s water source until its root system matures.

How are giant succulents divided?

As much soil as you can from the unpotted plant by turning it right side up and gently prying out the roots. Cut through the roots of the plant if it is difficult to break apart, then start at the top and divide the plant into portions. Do it quickly, but don’t be concerned if some of the roots fall off. In dry soil, they will recover swiftly.

Can succulents be grown from seed straight in the ground?

Fill a shallow tray with succulent soil (I like to add in some perlite or pumice) and lay the callused leaves on top to propagate your succulent leaves directly in or on soil.

They can also be planted in the ground with the calloused end down. Simply put, this wouldn’t allow you to observe the roots develop.

Water infrequently or not at all until roots begin to grow. The leaves will almost always rot if there is too much water at this time.

I spray a small amount of water just in front of the leaves after placing them on top of the soil. Just enough moisture to make the roots feel comfortable.

When roots or young succulents begin to emerge, spray the leaf cuttings to hydrate the roots. Avoid getting the actual leaves wet. To prevent the roots from drying out, repeat this procedure every few days or so.

Succulent cuttings should be kept in strong light, but until the new plants are more established, direct sun should be avoided.

Transfer them now into their individual pots. Make sure not to overly damage the roots. Keep the young succulents above the dirt and merely cover the roots with soil.

Avoid plucking up the leaves repeatedly to inspect their roots! Although it’s tempting, try to restrain yourself. The young roots can be damaged and stressed out if they are disturbed. The roots will frequently wilt and shrivel up as a result.

Can you prune succulents that have grown too large?

Succulents benefit most from pruning at the start of their growing season, although you can prune them at any time. If you prune around the end of the growing season, new growth might not appear as rapidly, but it will develop gradually and accelerate once they begin to grow vigorously again.

There are numerous succulents that grow best in the summer, but there are also quite a few that grow best in the winter. To determine when your succulents are actively developing, check at this dormancy table.

My succulents are often pruned in the spring, after spending the winter indoors. Typically, they become quite stretched out and lose some of their initial beauty.

I can freshen the arrangement by pruning them without needing to buy new plants. It’s a fantastic approach to grow your garden!

How are elongated succulents treated?

It consists of these four simple steps:

  • Trim the stem to a length that will fit in your new pot.
  • Get rid of any extra leaves beneath the main rosette.
  • Dry everything for a couple of days.
  • Replant your succulents and cactus in new potting soil.

Step One: Cut

If you have a longer stem to deal with, that will assist it get nicely anchored into your new pot. You may truly cut the stem anywhere and it will start to sprout roots out of the sides and bottom after you replant it. You can just nestle the succulent’s base deep into the earth for replanting, or you can use a stem as short as an inch. To create cuts like these, always use clean, sharp pruning shears. These pruning shears look to be an upgrade of the ones I’ve had for ten years and use every day and adore.

Step Two: Remove Excess Leaves

Remove any leaves that are below that in order to form a wonderful rosette formation, similar to what you presumably had when you initially purchased your succulents. Save those leaves because they may be planted in soil and will each produce a new succulent plant.

Step Three: Dry

Any cuts or cracks you create in a succulent should be left exposed for one to two days. This enables it to sort of scab over and guards against bacterial infections that may happen if the succulent is exposed to any excess moisture. The chances are good that your freshly cut succulents will still dry out without first allowing them to air dry; however, it will take a little longer for the cuts to close up and you run a slight danger of something going wrong. But it’s up to you!

Step Four: Replant

Replanting your succulents into a fresh pot using cactus/succulent potting soil is the last step. This is quite simple. Simply poke a small hole with your finger and put the plant’s stem into the soil. The added benefit is that, while they adjust to their new surroundings, you don’t even need to water them for a week!

What succulent is the most straightforward to grow?

Having a collection of succulents might be most gratifying when you propagate them. You can increase the number of a popular plant in your yard through propagation, swap plants with friends, and even preserve a dying plant. Here are our top ten picks for beginner-friendly succulents.

Sedum rubrotinctum (Pork and Beans or Jelly Beans)

Bright crimson in direct sunlight; green in shadow. This resilient Sedum quickly fills in container gardens and rock gardens. Remove the leaves and place yourself on a damp, well-draining surface.

Echeveria ‘Lola’

one of the most productive Echeveria leaf plants. Both newcomers and seasoned collectors adore the flawlessly round rosette and the pearly pink leaves. They germinate swiftly and successfully spread through leaves in large numbers.

Sedum nussbaumerianum

difficult in dry, warm areas with little water. Easy to grow from leaf or tip cuttings. Before planting in soil, wait for a scab to develop (this takes about a week). This species’ colors and leaf shapes vary widely.

Sempervivum arachnoideum (Cobweb Houseleek)

Fast-growing and yields more offsets than you could possibly use! Plant cuttings directly in damp soil after cutting propagation, and you’ll observe roots forming in approximately a week.

Graptopetalum paraguayense (Ghost Plant)

A stunning hanging rosette succulent that may change color depending on the environment to orange, bronze, pink, and purple. It is quite simple to spread by leaves; you might even notice one growing on its own.

Echeveria colorata

Initially slow, but well worth the wait. Echeveria colorata starts out by producing lovely leaf sprouts with scarlet tips. Before removing the mother leaf from the new plant, wait until it has totally died.

Echeveria lilacina (Ghost Echeveria)

We frequently see the succulent Echeveria lilacina multiplying by itself. By planting leaves gently in soil with their roots down and leaf up, you can prevent the fast curling that occurs with leaves.

Propagate succulent stems above water

Succulents can indeed be grown hydroponically, but you should use caution when doing so. Remove the lowest leaves from your mother plant by making a clean cut. After that, take a water jar and wrap it with plastic wrap. Make a few holes in it, and with the stem never actually touching the water, insert the exposed nodes about half an inch above the water. Whenever the water evaporates, top it off. Your roots should begin to expand in two to three weeks.

Propagate succulents on a wet paper towel

Leaving succulents on a paper towel is another approach to grow them. For a few days, let the ends of your succulent leaf cuttings dry out on a piece of paper towel on a tray. Spray water on the paper towel after a few days, then do it again after a few days. You should begin to notice roots and pups after a few weeks. Some gardeners will additionally cover the paper towel with a clear lid with holes or plastic wrap. You can eventually move your succulents into soil using both the jar and paper towel methods. Just remember that not all of your cuttings might grow successfully because the roots might be shocked by being transplanted into a different media.

Since succulents have so many fleshy leaves and may grow rapidly, you’ll always have room to experiment even if not all of your plants produce roots and pups. You’ll be able to share your succulents sooner than you think if you use leaf cuttings, new cactus soil, bright indirect light, and sporadic spritzes of water.

Are succulents tolerant of crowds?

Speaking with individuals about succulent care or watching succulent care “in the wild” has made me aware of some of the misconceptions around succulent plants in the horticultural community. Just stroll through the nurseries in garden centers, where staff members are highly qualified. There are numerous excellently kept ornamental plants, fruit trees, and beautifully managed bedding plants, all of which have been nourished, watered, and maintained. then go for the section with succulents. You’ll find plants that have been improperly labeled, overwatered, underwatered, and generally neglected. In response to requests for assistance from merchants and landscaping contractors, I pondered this for a long time.

Successful succulent care is a synthesis of numerous elements, just like taking care of other plants. soil, water, fertilizer, exposure, control of pests and diseases, upkeep, and most importantly, observing and asking questions about the health of the plants.

Observing the plants and wondering what is going on with them. Yes, I believe that this is the most crucial element in keeping succulent plants healthy and beautiful. Applying what you have learnt to this group of plants will go a long way toward success with them if you are a gardener with prior success cultivating other types of plants. A plant is most likely not healthy if it does not appear to be so. Like any other plant that does not appear to be healthy, a plant that is unhealthy is likely dealing with challenges relating to soil, water, fertilizer, pest and disease control, upkeep, or a combination of these issues.

Due to their adaptation to places where water is scarce for extended periods of time, succulent plants differ somewhat from normal herbaceous perennial plants. As a result, their relationship with water plays a significant role in what makes them special. When it comes to gathering and preserving water, succulent plants are particularly effective. Additionally, they are more vulnerable to issues if exposed to excessive water. One of the most important determining aspects in maintaining the health of succulents is water management.

Here are some general care instructions for succulents, including everything from water to soil to sunlight.

Soil

The secret to soil mix in containers and in the landscape is good drainage and aeration. The majority of commercial soil mixtures are a little too dense and hold a lot of water for succulents. Adding coarse perlite, crushed lava, or pumice to conventional potting mixtures will usually be sufficient to transform them into effective succulent potting mixtures. Normally, I advise mixing 1 part amendment with 4 parts potting mix. For succulents like cactus that require even more drainage and aeration, the proportion of amendment can be increased.

There are a number of high-quality choices available on the market if you want to purchase pre-mixed soil, including the E.B. Stone Cactus mix that we carry at the nursery.

Water

Thick stems and leaves that effectively gather and store water are characteristics of succulent plants. Traditional plant varieties have thin leaves and require more frequent hydration and watering. Even though the soil is damp, a plant like a coleus may wilt on a hot day. For the coleus to have more humidity and water availability, more regular watering is required. The succulent is less prone to wilt since it has water stored in its leaves and stem. Before being watered, succulent plants prefer to get close to being dry. The plant’s root ball stores the rest of the remaining moisture when the earth dries out. It’s time to water when this area is almost completely dry. Water the plant thoroughly so that the soil is completely saturated and some water runs out the bottom of the plant. Watering a succulent is very much the same as watering any other plant, only not as frequently.

When the environment is unfavorable, there is an exception to how you water a succulent. Poor air circulation, cloudy, dark days, and inadequate lighting may be examples of this. The plant will dry out extremely slowly in these conditions, so it will require controlled watering—giving it tiny doses of water—to prevent being overly wet for an extended period of time. Again, keeping plants healthy requires paying attention to what they need.

Fertilizer

Like most plants, succulents like being fed. Succulents vary from other plants in that they require less fertilizer less frequently since they are so effective. I do not suggest giving succulents any particular fertilizer. As you develop your plant-growing skills, experimenting with various fertilizers may improve the quality of your plants and/or blooms. Use a balanced fertilizer in the interim, such as 10-10-10 or 20-20-20. To maintain a healthy, growing plant, a fertilizer that is well-balanced is essential. There are a variety of all-purpose fertilizers that will work; at the nursery, we carry and advise Maxsea All-Purpose Plant Food.

An overabundance of fertilizer will promote excessive growth, which gives the plant a weedy appearance. Insufficient water will cause the plant to go into suspended animation and appear to be motionless. I advise halving the stated dosage rate and fertilizing no more frequently than once per month. Since most succulents become dormant throughout the winter, it’s usually not required to fertilize them.

Exposure

Succulent plants, like the majority of plants, prefer a climate with plenty of sunlight and clean air. Many people have misconceptions about succulents. One of the topics that people misinterpret is sunlight. When the topic of succulents is brought up, many people immediately think “desert.” In actuality, succulent plants grow most attractively when given a little sun protection. Succulent plants can develop good color and form without being dried out by the heat of the midday sun if they are grown in a few hours of early sun throughout the warmer months of the year. Shade fabric, lattice, or even the partial shadowing offered by a tree will help break up the heat of the sun in a southern exposure when the sun is shining on the area all day. More light exposure will aid the plant in preserving its good shape and color as winter draws closer. The plant will seem parched and burnt out if it receives too much sunlight. Too little sunshine causes the plant to extend out in search of more light, losing its beautiful compact structure.

Cold Tolerance

Information on the cold tolerance of several succulent plants was lacking until recently. If you don’t know a plant’s resistance to cold, I advise thinking it will freeze or suffer harm if the temperature falls below 32 degrees Fahrenheit, or freezing. Plants can be protected from light frost using inexpensive materials like frost cloth. These materials work well to increase your level of protection by 4 to 6 degrees.

Pest and Disease Control

Aphids are always going to be aphids. Like other plants, succulents will be attacked by insects. The idea is to observe your plants, look more closely, and explore anything that seems abnormal. Like any other plant, succulents require the ideal exposure or location, as well as decent soil, appropriate watering, and fertilizer. You are less likely to encounter bugs if these factors are properly balanced.

Succulent plants are susceptible to the same bugs and diseases that affect other plants, which is a fact of life. Succulents require the same level of pest and disease monitoring as other plants. As with other plants, aphids typically target the blossoms and new growth on succulents. Like other plants, measly bugs live on the roots of the plant and lodge between the leaves near new development. They can also infest the soil. Earwigs and snails both eat on the leaves. Succulent leaves may get powdery mildew, especially after extended periods of bad weather. Not to mention the ants, of course. Farmers are ants. Ants use plants like succulents to develop bugs that will help feed all of their ant companions, just as you may rototill the dirt and plant carrot seeds for your habit of drinking carrot juice. Any ants you see on your plants, get rid of them.

Therefore, these so-called succulent plants are not bug-proof. Although they are hardy and can endure an infection for a long time, healthy, attractive plants must be watched over, and when an infestation does arise, it must be treated with.

You decide how to handle an infestation. To help identify the bug or disease, you may speak with someone at your neighborhood nursery or your acquaintance who is an avid gardener. You decide whether to utilize organic materials or nuclear weapons, water, soap, q-tips, or chemicals. The most important thing is to address the issue as soon as you become aware of it.