How To Plant Succulent Plants In Pots

To plant succulents successfully, remove as much soil as you can from the nursery pot and get rid of it. Succulents are almost always planted in overly dense, water-retentive soil at nurseries. The better the roots of your succulent will be, the more of this nursery dirt you can get rid of.

It’s possible that you won’t be able to completely remove the soil without endangering the roots, and that’s great. Simply remove what you can while being gentle with your succulent.

I normally advise against washing off the roots of your succulents because it may be harmful to them and result in issues in the future. In the video below below, I go over this in greater detail:

You should try to keep the roots whole if you’re planting your succulent all by itself, like I am here. On the other hand, you might want to break off some of the roots if you’re assembling an arrangement with numerous succulents.

Nothing major will result from removing a few roots.

In either case, your succulent will thrive. And now is a good time to get rid of the babies if you’re fortunate enough to have any linked to your primary plant.

What kind of soil are succulents planted in?

Regular potting soil from your yard won’t work for succulents since they need soil that drains. Select cactus soil or potting soil that has been mixed with sand, pumice, or perlite. Be gentle when repotting because succulent roots are extremely brittle.

How deeply should succulents be planted?

You can add additives to up to three-fourths of your succulent plant soil. Pumice has been used alone in some tests with successful outcomes, however this is in the Philippines, where regular watering is required. Those of us who live in less ideal climates might need to try new things.

Along with coconut coir, pumice, perlite, and Turface, coarse sand is frequently employed (a volcanic product sold as a soil conditioner). For this project, use Turface, and purchase the medium-sized stones. For outdoor succulent beds, expanded shale is used to improve the soil.

Additionally, pumice is a component of the intriguing product Dry Stall Horse Bedding. Some people use this directly into the ground when making a bed for a succulent garden. This product should not be confused with another one named Stall Dry.

Although river rock is occasionally added to the soil, it is more frequently used as a top dressing or decorative element in your garden beds. As an amendment or mulch, horticultural grit or a variant is utilized, just as aquarium gravel.

Consider the layout and have a plan when setting up a succulent garden bed, but be flexible once you start planting. While some sources advise preparing the soil three inches (8 cm) deep, others advise doing so at least six to eight inches (15 to 20 cm) down. When adding outdoor succulent soil to your bed, the deeper, the better.

Create hills and slopes where you can plant various specimens. Elevated planting not only provides your garden bed a unique aspect, but it also elevates the roots of your cacti and succulents even more.

Can I grow succulents in normal potting soil?

I’ll address some of the most prevalent queries concerning succulent soil in this section. Ask your question in the comments section below if you can’t find it here.

Can you use regular potting soil for succulents?

For succulents, you could probably use ordinary potting soil. It might work quite well, especially if you frequently forget to water your plants or if they are small. However, make sure the soil thoroughly dries out in between waterings to prevent them from rotting.

What happens if you plant succulents in regular potting soil?

Succulents planted in normal potting soil run the danger of being overwatered. Your succulents may quickly decay if the soil absorbs too much moisture.

What is the difference between potting soil and succulent soil?

The components and consistency of succulent soil and regular potting soil are different. Succulent dirt is permeable and created to drain very rapidly, unlike regular potting soil, which is composed of organic ingredients that hold onto moisture.

Making my own potting soil helps me save a ton of money, plus my succulents thrive in it. Your succulents will flourish now that you are aware of the ideal soil to use and have my formula for creating your own.

Can succulents endure direct sunlight?

Due to their drought tolerance and water-storing properties, which enable them to tolerate high heat and very harsh sun exposure, succulents have become well-known. This is true for the majority of succulent plants, however some cannot survive direct sunlight without protection, and if exposed to excessive heat, they may suffer sun damage. &nbsp

The best 10 succulents and cacti that will thrive in full sun are listed below. Some of these plants can withstand full sun exposure better than others.

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How frequently do I need to water my succulents?

During the months that are not winter, when the temperature is above 40 degrees, you should water your succulents every other week. You should only water your succulent once a month in the winter (when the temperature falls below 40 degrees), as it goes dormant at this period.

A few situations constitute an exception to this rule. Because their tiny leaves can’t hold as much water as other varieties with larger leaves, some varieties of succulents need to be watered more frequently. In the non-winter months, feel free to give these small leaf succulents a water if they appear to be thirsty. When they are thirsty, succulents generally exhibit a wrinkled appearance. But always keep in mind that being underwater is preferable to being overwater.

Can succulents be grown in just rocks?

It should be obvious that succulents will thrive when planted in rocks given these circumstances. They drain very well and do not retain water, which eliminates the possibility of root rot. This does not include another component of soil, though, since all plants need nutrients.

Although succulents are not particularly hungry plants, they do need certain nutrients to grow. Other micronutrients like zinc or iron are needed in smaller levels, whereas macronutrients like nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium are essential. The plant won’t grow at all or last very long without these nutrients.

By their very nature, rocks don’t release nutrients quickly enough to keep the plants alive. They are composed of minerals, but since they decompose so slowly over time, they are not appropriate for growing on their own. Additionally, they often don’t retain enough moisture, allowing the roots to quickly dry out after draining practically instantly.

Sadly, this means that succulents cannot thrive permanently without soil in rocks. If not given regular care, they may survive for several weeks or even months on the nutrients found in the stems and leaves.

Where should I grow succulents for best results?

Inexperienced succulent growers frequently believe that the sunniest spot in the yard is the ideal place for their plants, but not all succulents enjoy spending the entire day in the sunbathing position. “Among the countless species of succulents, preferences might vary greatly. Some people prefer shade, while others prefer filtered light, sun, and blazing sun. According to Jesch, most people prefer at least two to three hours of filtered sun each day.

Succulents need at least two or three hours of full sun each day to thrive indoors, so position them by a window or in a garden room. You can also overwinter your succulents under grow lights if a window with natural light is not an option. “Bring your plants outside gradually to give them time to adapt so they won’t get sunburned when they can once more enjoy the outdoors. Jesch says.

The best way to tell if a succulent is receiving enough water is to look at how healthy its leaves are.

Which fertilizer is ideal for succulents?

Succulents grow lush and beautiful with a modest feeding of manure tea, diluted fish emulsion, or a balanced fertilizer (15-15-15). Liquid fertilizers that are concentrated should be diluted. Roots could be harmed if this is not done.

Use one Moo Poo tea bag per three gallons of water, steeped overnight, for succulents growing in containers. Pour until it runs out the bottom starting at the plant’s base. Alternately, apply half-diluted fish emulsion.

Although in-ground succulents don’t technically require fertilization, you can encourage lush spring growth by applying Ironite per the instructions on the package, ideally before a winter storm. Apply a balanced granular fertilizer in the spring (if you like to; it is not required).

Before repotting succulents, should you water them?

Repotting a succulent is necessary if its roots are cramming the container or if it needs to grow larger for any other reason.

Early spring or early fall, just before their growing season begins, are the ideal times of year for repotting succulents.

Since they can only remain in a pot for two years before beginning to exhibit signs of potted fatigue, which can eventually result in root rot and other issues, repotting should always be done at least every two years.

Before being repotted, succulents need to be watered for a few days to allow them to dry out.

This is due to the fact that when you water them, they do absorb moisture, and that should give your succulents’ roots enough time to absorb all possible moisture before being replanted.

Additionally, it is important to do this to give them time to become used to their new pot and soil, which is a little bit drier than their previous environment.

Your succulents must dry out for a few days before you may clear the old soil from the roots with water while repotting them.

When ought to succulents be potted again?

Evergreen succulents have always captured my heart. Succulents are low maintenance plants that thrive in containers because to their unusual forms and thick leaves; I have a large collection of these well-liked varieties.

Repotting succulents every two years is a good general rule of thumb, if only to give them access to new, fertile soil. The beginning of a succulent’s growing season is the optimal time to repot it because it provides the plant its best chance of surviving. My gardeners, Ryan and Wilmer, took advantage of the snowy weather earlier this week to repot many succulent plants and propagate a variety of cuttings. Here are some pictures of the steps we took.

In times of drought, succulents, sometimes known as fat plants, store water in their fleshy leaves, stems, or stem-root systems. Because of their eye-catching shapes, succulents are frequently planted as attractive plants.

I needed to repot a few of the succulents in my collection either they had outgrown their pots or I wanted to relocate them into more attractive clay containers.

He stamps my name and the year the pot was produced on the reverse side. When I host big events in my home, they invariably look fantastic.

To aid in drainage, a clay shard is placed over the hole. Additionally, I like using clay pots because they permit adequate aeration and moisture to reach the plant via the sides.

We always keep the shards from broken pots; it’s a fantastic method to use those parts again.

Wilmer carefully takes a succulent from its pot without damaging any of the roots.

Wilmer then conducts a meticulous test to determine if the pot is the proper size for the plant. He picks a pot just a hair bigger than the plant’s original container.

Prills are the name for osmocote particles. A core of nutrients composed of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium is covered by the prill’s beige shell.

For the finest drainage, we mix equal parts of sand, perlite, and vermiculite for succulents. The correct soil mixture will also aid in promoting rapid root growth and provide young roots with quick anchoring.

Wait a few days before watering the succulents after repotting to give them time to become used to the new soil.

Wilmer shifts to the following plant. This one too need a little maintenance attention. He picked up any fallen leaves.

In order to promote new development, Wilmer lightly pruned the roots after manually loosening the root ball.

Wilmer inserted the plant into the pot after adding some Osmocote and a little amount of potting soil.

The pale blue-gray leaves of Echevaria runyonii ‘Topsy turvy’ curve upward, are prominently inversely keeled on the bottom surface, and have leaf tips that point inward toward the center of the plant.

Echeverias are among the most alluring succulents, and plant aficionados greatly respect them for their brilliant colors and lovely rosette shapes.

An aeonium is a succulent with rosette-like leaves that grows quickly. Aeonium is a varied genus that includes little or medium-sized plants, stemless or shrub-like, and plants that favor sun or shade.

Succulents should be placed on a table so that they can get enough of natural light even when the sun isn’t shining directly on their pots.

Moreover, propagation is fairly simple. Here, Ryan uses sharp pruners to cut a three to four-inch portion of stem off the mother plant.

There should be about a half-inch of stem showing. A handful of them are ready to be planted here.

Ryan provides plenty of space for the plants. There will be plenty to use in mixed urns during the summer if all of these take root and grow into succulent plants. Four to six weeks following planting, new growth should start to show, at which point each plant should be repotted independently.

Inside my main greenhouse, all of my priceless plant collections are kept on long, sliding tables. They all have such lovely looks. Which succulents are your favorites? Please share your feedback in the spaces below.