How To Plant Indoor Succulents

I suggest investing in a pot or planter that you can stand to look at every day if you’re growing succulents indoors! After all, indoor plants play a significant role in the dcor of your house.

Personally, I absolutely adore keeping my succulents and indoor plants in pots that are either ivory-creme or crisp white, like the ones in this post. I believe it highlights the succulents while blending in nicely with our furnishings and other elements.

Always keep in mind how crucial it is for the root system of your succulents to choose a pot with a drainage hole. Succulents may last for days, even weeks or months without water because they store water in their leaves and stems. They are resistant to drought because they can store water in this way.

In order to prevent the roots of your succulents from sitting in moist soil, a drainage hole allows excess water to flow from the pot.

Actually, one of the main causes of dying succulents is too much moisture. Succulents’ roots will eventually decay if they are left to sit in wet soil, which will result in a dead plant. Simply put, succulents don’t require that much water.

Planting succulents in a container with a drainage hole will benefit them. They’ll repay you by developing into thriving, healthy plants!

A excellent place to start is with a decent cactus mix or soil blend designed specifically for succulents. Succulents require good drainage and air circulation to thrive, and this soil will offer both.

It’s time to fill your container with your succulent or cactus mix once you have it on hand. (If you want to prevent soil from leaking out, you can cover the drainage hole with some mesh.)

Fill the pot with enough dirt to allow your succulents to protrude above the rim. Simply add extra dirt to raise it if the leaves touch below the rim.

TIP:I almost never remove soil from a succulent’s roots before planting it. This isn’t required in my opinion. I just remove the plant from its plastic container and place it, soil and everything, in its new pot.

I’ve been doing it this way for years and don’t see any reason to alter. I’m aware that many gardeners remove the roots from their existing soil, but I find that my plants do better when I don’t. Only when I’m doing crafts with live succulents do I do it.

One of the most fascinating aspects of gardening is that everyone develops their own preferred method of doing things, even if there are undoubtedly some rules you should abide by. If it functions for you, that’s fantastic! Continue your wonderful work. To each their own, as the saying goes.

Simply plant each succulent near apart if you want to create the appearance of densely packed succulents. As long as the base of the plant is sitting over the lip of the pot, as seen in the photo, tuck in each plant wherever it looks good. (The image is from my Instagram page, where I share pictures of succulent arrangements and gardening advice.)

Consider this process as being artistic. It takes art to make lovely succulent or flower arrangements! It’s best to mix and match your succulents while paying attention to color, texture, and height if you want to create a pleasing arrangement.

Succulents don’t seem to mind growing so closely together, so I never worry about that. Additionally, they remain compact when grown in this manner, which I appreciate. They can continue to grow in this manner in the same pot for up to a year before you need to consider relocating them once they outgrow it.

Particularly for my indoor plants, I particularly prefer smaller succulents than ones that appear overgrown. You have a choice: you can plant one, two, or a lot of succulents in a pot. I have engaged in each one and have enjoyed it equally.

Before planting, try arranging your succulents above the ground to see if you like how they appear together. After that, you can start planting or moving things around.

Simply dig a hole in the ground for each plant and surround its root systems with soil to plant it.

How to Water Succulents After Planting

Don’t water your succulents right away after repotting them, despite what you might assume. Before giving them their first drink of water, I advise waiting about a week.

Any roots that were harmed during the transplant or who previously had damage could get infected or rotten if you water them after planting. It will take a few days for those roots to callus over or heal, preventing them from absorbing water that would cause them to decay.

Use a tiny watering can to hydrate your succulents if you only repotted one or two of them. However, if you planted them the same way I did in the image above, you’ll benefit more from using a watering squeeze bottle because it will allow you to apply water more precisely.

To make sure the succulents in the container receive adequate water, you should water them regularly using a watering syringe or a watering squeeze bottle, as seen in the image below.

TIP: If this is your first time growing succulents, you should know that you need ONLY water the soil, NOT the actual leaves.

The soil requires moisture, not the leaves, because the roots will absorb the water and transfer it to the leaves, where it will be stored.

It’s acceptable to get the leaves wet if you’re growing succulents outdoors and have them planted directly in the ground because the sun will soon evaporate the water. You don’t need to be concerned about your leaves rotting from too much water exposure.

How can I set up a succulent plant inside?

The advantages of indoor plants are endless.

They increase mood, air quality, and even focus and concentration. Succulents are among the simplest and most adaptable houseplants to include into your decor, and making your own indoor succulent garden is a wonderful way to do it.

You may make your own arrangement of lush and beautiful succulents in just a few easy steps.

  • Select a Container The versatility of indoor succulent gardens is one of their most beautiful features. Succulents may be grown in a variety of sizes and shapes, thus almost any container can be used as a succulent planter. Succulents don’t require a deep container to support their roots because of their slow growth, therefore even the most unusual container can be used as a planter. Wide, shallow bowls or pots are popular, but you may also construct your own garden out of a wine glass, a wooden trough, a mug, a shadow box, an old bucket, a candle holder, or even half of a huge shell.
  • Ensure drainage It’s crucial that your container has adequate drainage because succulents don’t want their roots to be damp. If at all possible, the container’s bottom should be pierced with a hole, but you can also ensure proper drainage by placing 1-2 inches of gravel in the pot’s base. To prevent soil from spilling out of a hole, cover it with a small piece of screening or a scrap of newspaper.
  • Fill in the Base With a succulent-friendly soil, like a cactus and succulent potting mix with plenty of drainage, fill in the base of your pot or planting container. Sand and vermiculite or other similar minerals can be added to standard potting soil to enhance drainage and make it suitable for a succulent garden.
  • Decide on Your Plants To give the layout considerable visual interest, choose plants with a variety of forms, colors, and textures for your succulent garden. However, make sure that all of the plants require a similar amount of care so that they may coexist in harmony. Because they grow slowly, plants don’t mind being packed closely together, so take your time positioning them around the pot. A trailing plant might look lovely next to the edge of the pot, or you might choose to place smaller plants all around a larger specimen.
  • Complete the Soil After placing the plants in their respective locations in your garden pot, add more dirt and lightly compact it around each plant. However, avoid planting the plants too deeply or burying them, since this could lead to root rot. A top dressing layer of gravel, sand, glass marbles, sea glass, or crushed shells can be a lovely method to tie the garden together. Top off the planter with a decorative material if desired.
  • Attach extras Accessorizing succulent gardens can be enjoyable, and you could wish to use miniature props to transform your indoor garden into a fairy world. Other ideas include inserting a larger “boulder” or huge seashell into the arrangement or adding moss as a final touch around the plants.
  • Sprout the Garden Following planting, sprinkle the garden gently with a spray bottle to water it, being careful not to overwater the plants. Overwatering succulents can cause them to decay, therefore it is preferable to let them dry out a bit rather than keep them damp. When they receive fresh water, they will recover if they are dry and will start to shrivel or wrinkle.
  • Lie back and enjoy! Even inside, full sun or a location where they will receive many hours of good sunshine each day are optimal for succulent gardens. However, stay away from placing the garden close to a heating or cooling vent that could cause temperature extremes. On a kitchen table, the corner of a desk, or a mantelpiece, a succulent garden can look beautiful. You may design a succulent garden to be the ideal match everywhere you want to add a touch of greenery to your home’s decor!

Do indoor succulents require sunlight?

It might be challenging for succulents to receive adequate sunlight inside. They typically require 6 hours each day of bright, indirect sunshine outside.

However, indoors, you should put your succulents close to a window that receives light throughout the day. Place your succulents close to the brightest window or area of your house or office if this is not an option.

Watch this video to learn more:

Do succulents grow well in glass bowls?

It is simplest to use an unglazed porous material like a concrete bowl or terra cotta because they will both absorb some water. You may grow succulents in a glass bowl, but you need to be especially careful not to overwater them.

Do you use potting soil while planting succulents?

Every soil mixture contains both organic and mineral components. Mineral matter, such as clay, silt, and sand, support soil drainage, whereas organic matter, such as humus and decomposing plant tissue, serves to retain moisture in the soil and give nutrients to the plant.

Because succulents can withstand drought and don’t require constant watering, their potting soil should be permeable, well-draining, and contain less organic matter than typical indoor soil mixtures. Ideal soil is a loose, granular mixture with a good amount of sand and perlite or pumice.

Do succulents require certain soil?

Regular potting soil from your yard won’t work for succulents since they need soil that drains. Select cactus soil or potting soil that has been mixed with sand, pumice, or perlite. Be gentle when repotting because succulent roots are extremely brittle.

Does cacti require deep pots?

Succulents should be planted in pots that are about 10% broader than the plants themselves. Choose the shallow pot whenever the choice is between a deep or shallow pot. The pot’s depth should be 10% greater than the plant’s depth.

Let’s clarify using instances from real life:

  • Grab a 2.5 (the best option) to 4 inch pot (the exact maximum size) for optimal outcomes if you have a 2 inch succulent.
  • Grab a 4.5 (the best option) to 6 inch pot (the exact maximum size) for optimal results if you have a 4 inch succulent.

How frequently should succulents be watered indoors?

Indoor succulent plants probably need to be watered once a week. They require ample time for the soil to dry out in between waterings so that the water may be stored in the leaves. Use the following methods and advice while watering succulent plants inside.

  • Use an irrigation system with a little pour spout.
  • Fill the succulent plant’s center with water until it is completely submerged.
  • Allow water to completely drain out of the pot through the perforations. Make careful to empty any water that seeps through the soil if there is a saucer underneath the plant.
  • Since there won’t be enough heat and fresh airflow for the leaves to dry when planted indoors, avoid soaking the leaves to prevent rot from the top down.
  • Dry the soil completely in between waterings.

Are cacti a decent choice for beginners?

No matter how green their thumb may be, succulents are a remarkably diverse group of plants that have enduring appeal for all gardeners. Even the most ardent grower and collector can remain engaged in succulent collecting because there are practically endless types. Additionally, because of their low maintenance requirements and capacity for reproduction, they are forgiving of novice gardeners still getting the swing of things and are simple to care for.

How frequently must I water my succulents?

During the months that are not winter, when the temperature is above 40 degrees, you should water your succulents every other week. You should only water your succulent once a month in the winter (when the temperature falls below 40 degrees), as it goes dormant at this period.

A few situations constitute an exception to this rule. Because their tiny leaves can’t hold as much water as other varieties with larger leaves, some varieties of succulents need to be watered more frequently. In the non-winter months, feel free to give these small leaf succulents a water if they appear to be thirsty. When they are thirsty, succulents generally exhibit a wrinkled appearance. But always keep in mind that being underwater is preferable to being overwater.

Succulents can they grow without soil in rocks?

It should be obvious that succulents would thrive when planted in rocks given these circumstances. They drain very well and do not retain water, which eliminates the possibility of root rot. This does not include another component of soil, though, since all plants need nutrients.

Although succulents are not particularly hungry plants, they do need certain nutrients to grow. Other micronutrients like zinc or iron are needed in smaller levels, whereas macronutrients like nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium are essential. The plant won’t grow at all or last very long without these nutrients.

By their very nature, rocks don’t release nutrients quickly enough to keep the plants alive. They are composed of minerals, but since they decompose so slowly over time, they are not appropriate for growing on their own. Additionally, they often don’t retain enough moisture, allowing the roots to quickly dry out after draining practically instantly.

Sadly, this means that succulents cannot thrive permanently without soil in rocks. If not given regular care, they may survive for several weeks or even months on the nutrients found in the stems and leaves.