How To Plant A Baby Succulent

Succulents can also grow from solitary leaves. Succulent cultivars with fleshy, plump leaves that are simple to remove function well with this technique. Leaf propagation spares less of the “mother” plant and each leaf can create numerous little plants, even though it will take much longer to produce a full-sized plant. Getting a quality leaf cutting is crucial, much like with stem cuttings. Although they must split from the plant at the base of the stem, leaves can be wiggled off of a plant. Kremblas advises caution, saying, “Be sure to reach all the way down to where the leaf joins the stem, as a broken leaf will not propagate.” And make sure to select a leaf that is firm, plump, and limp-free.

Leaf cuttings should be allowed to callus and need partial sun to grow, just like stem cuttings. Leaf cuttings should be placed on top of a thin layer of succulent potting soil (not buried), and they should be misted with water to keep them wet. The leaf cuttings will start to grow little “pup” plants in about three weeks. The mother leaves will start to wilt and drop off after eight weeks, at which point your pups are ready to be planted.

How should young succulents be treated?

If you’re unsure of what to do with succulent puppies, you have options. If there is enough room, you can either leave them where they are and let them continue to grow there, or you can separate them and transplant them separately. However, wait until they are the size of a quarter before removing.

Pups should be removed with a precise cut using clean, sharp pruners or scissors. Normally, I would advise using a soft touch, but after seeing films from the professionals, I don’t think that is necessary—just another example of how resilient succulent plants may be.

Can you grow puppies of succulents?

The newborn can be planted in the ground once the dried end has healed over. In order to help babies and cuttings stay moist a little bit longer than they would on the standard gritty mix that I recommend for succulents, I advise putting them in a layer of coconut coir.

Your puppy has to be in a pot that isn’t too big but still allows for growth. Usually, one centimeter (0.5″) of space is sufficient around the edge of its leaves. Anything that gives more than 1 inch (2.5 cm) on either side should be avoided when planting it.

So if your puppy has a diameter of about 1″, put it in a pot with a 2-3″ diameter.

Put the cutting in a spot that receives plenty of bright, indirect light. The baby may experience stress from the sun and burn or quickly dry out. If you’re growing indoors, place it near a window with plenty of light or place it under grow lights for a few hours every day.

Can young succulents be repotted?

Repotting your succulents is required for a number of reasons. However, it’s always better to do so just before their growing season, which often occurs in the early spring or early fall for most succulents, regardless of the reason. The succulents will have ample opportunity to recuperate from the repotting in this fashion.

Signs that can help you decide when to report:

  • freshly acquired succulents. Succulents that have just been purchased typically arrive in tiny, plastic containers, which may stunt their growth. Therefore, it is very advised to move your new baby to a different planter within two weeks of bringing them home (preferably one that will help with moisture and has proper drainage, like a&nbspterracotta pot).
  • Succulent begins to outgrow its container. When this occurs, you’ll typically notice that the roots start to protrude from the pot holes because the space is getting too small and restricting their ability to grow to their full potential. &nbsp

The space is becoming too small as the succulent roots start to protrude through the pot holes.

  • After watering, the soil dries out too rapidly, necessitating you to water the plant more frequently. If you notice that the water isn’t draining through the drainage hole of the pot, your succulent is at risk of developing root rot.
  • The plant begins to appear sickly or unwell. Although succulents are given the right amount of light and water, their once-plush and luxuriant leaves may abruptly turn soft, shriveled, or fading. When this occurs, check your succulents right once for any signs of root rot, illness, or potential pest infestation. Remove the plant from the pot and examine the roots if there are no indications of a problem on the leaves. Make sure to remove those that are already dead or don’t appear to be in good health before placing the remaining ones in a clean container with new soil.
  • The succulent starts to sag or collapse. When one of your succulents displays this indicator, it doesn’t necessarily indicate that it needs to be moved to a larger pot. They normally do this to let you know that while the roots of your succulent are still content in its current container, the top has grown heavy and has to be repotted into a heavier pot to prevent it from toppling over.
  • possess grown offsets or young. Many succulents will produce offsets, or what we commonly refer to as pups. It’s the ideal moment to repot and separate your succulents from the mother plant once they have given birth to a few pups, at which point you may begin propagating them.

How is a succulent puppy transplanted?

When a plant produces pups or offspring, it is essentially replicating itself. Succulents don’t always produce pups and offspring, but those that do essentially grow in numbers on their own. Among the numerous additional species that give birth to pups or offspring are hens and chicks, aloe, specific haworthia species, and cacti.

The pups and offshoots can be carefully removed, put in a suitable potting mix, and used to begin a new plant. By redirecting energy to the growth of the mother plant instead of supporting her pups, removing offshoots from the mother plant promotes its health.

Step 1

Look for plants that have pups or offspring. The young that develop from the mother plant are called pups and offshoots. Not every succulent plant gives birth to pups or offspring. Aloe, certain haworthia and cactus species, as well as many succulent species, do.

Step 2

Clean your knife. Make use of a clean, disinfected, sharp knife. Washing with warm, soapy water or wiping with rubbing alcohol will do this. To prevent spreading fungus or infections, be sure to clean the knife after each cutting by wiping it with alcohol.

Step 3

Locate pups or offspring that need to be removed. An offshoot or pup can be separated from the mother plant once it has reached a suitable size or begun to establish roots. When removing the pup, try to grab some roots. A pup without roots can be removed, but ones with roots that are already there will work much better. Without roots, pups or offshoots will ultimately establish roots on their own, but pups and offshoots with established roots stand a better chance of surviving on their own.

Step 4

Eliminate the branch. To gently remove the pup or branch from the mother plant, use a clean knife. Some pups or offspring are simpler to get rid of than others. The pup can occasionally be gently twisted off to separate them.

Sometimes you need to remove the pup using a sharp tool. By sliding the knife blade between the mother plant and the offshoot, carefully detach the baby plant from its mother plant. Sever the root that connects the pup to the parent plant before carefully pulling the two apart.

Insert the knife blade into the soil between the mother plant and the offshoot if you want to remove the pup while it’s still in the ground. To cut the connecting roots, slide the blade through the dirt. Then, using the sharp end of a small shovel, dig a few inches along the radial parameter after creating a 2-inch radius in the dirt around the base of the branch. By angling the spade underneath the offshoot, you can delicately pry it out of the ground to remove it.

Step 5

Set the pup down. The pup can be planted on its own after being removed. Prepare an appropriate, well-draining potting mixture, then add some of it to a tiny container. Put the pup or offspring in the ground. As soon as the plant is secure, lightly pack the earth around it.

Step 6

occasionally use water. More moisture is required by pups and offspring than by mature plants. Spray the soil with a spray bottle sparingly once every few days or whenever it seems dry. Reduce watering to once a week after the plant has a stronger root system.

Step 7

Keep away from the sun’s rays. When first planted in their own pot, shield young plants from direct sunshine to avoid sun damage. As a plant matures, gradually increase sunshine and sun exposure in accordance with the needs of the plant.

When should a succulent puppy be repotted?

Taking an active, healthy leaf from a mature succulent plant and utilizing it to establish a new plant is known as “propagating with leaf cuttings.” Because the leaves of succulents with fleshy, plump leaves, like echeveria, are simple to snap off cleanly, this method of propagation works well with them.

While some leaves may simply pop off with a little tug, others could necessitate the use of a sharp knife. Take a healthy leaf from the plant’s base with clean hands or a sterile knife, making sure to remove the full, undamaged leaf.

After being removed, allow the leaf to recover for about four days in a warm, well-lit place so that the wound can callus over. When the leaf has calloused, prepare a fresh planter with soil, fill it with water, and set the callused leaf on top of the soil for multiplication.

When the earth is dry, spritz your leaves with a spray bottle. Keep them warm, in a room with lots of light, but out of direct sunlight. They must be kept warm and moist.

Little roots and leaves will start to emerge after around three weeks! A succulent may need a few months to grow large enough to be replanted (photos above are after about 8 weeks). When the leaf eventually gets brown and falls off, you’ll know it’s time. This indicates that the succulent no longer requires the leaf because it has consumed all of its nutrients.

How are offshoots replanted?

It’s crucial to understand that young plants won’t be harmed or affected by them, particularly those that develop near the mother plant’s base.

Although the offsets may appear cramped or unpleasant, they are precisely where they should be.

Have faith in Mother Nature’s processes. They have been engaged in this activity for a lot longer than we have.

Be Patient

I advise delaying their removal until the offsets are roughly half the size of the main plant. This guarantees that your infants receive the right nutrition and have the best chance of surviving on their own.

What’s Next?

Once your succulents begin to produce offsets, you might want to repot them in a little bigger container to provide room for the hen and the baby chicks.

With a pair of pruners, you can remove the offsets once they have grown to half the size of the mother plant.

Watch for the wound to callus. Put them in a shady, light area on top of fresh soil, don’t water them, and ignore them.

They will eventually take root in the ground, and then presto! You were successful in creating one to eight new playable plants.

Can succulent cuttings be planted directly in the ground?

What is there to love other than a succulent? Obviously, a full garden of succulents! Fortunately for us, it’s simple to propagate a variety of these resilient, vibrant plants at home. We can’t wait to see succulents growing all year long in containers around the house and garden; there are various easy ways to reproduce them.

Propagating by Division: Plants that have gotten too leggy perform best with this method, which produces new succulents from cuttings. Start by delicately removing any leaves that may be attached to the stem below the rosette; be sure to preserve the leaf’s base while you do so. After all the leaves have been eliminated, cut the rosette with shears, leaving a brief stem intact. The cuttings should be let to dry in an empty tray for a few days until the raw ends have calloused. The cuttings can then be rooted in either water or soil.

Soil: After the stems have calloused, set the cuttings on top of a shallow tray filled with well-draining cactus/succulent soil. From the base of the cuttings, roots and little plants will start to emerge in a few weeks. Once the roots start to show, water sparingly once a week; take care not to overwater. The parent leaf will eventually wither; carefully remove it while taking care not to harm the young roots. Your propagated succulents can be replanted once they have established roots. As soon as the plants are established, keep them out of direct sunlight.

Water: After the stem has calloused, place a cutting with the end barely visible above the water’s surface on the lip of a glass or jar filled with water. Pick a sunny location for your glass. The incision will eventually produce roots that extend toward the water. Once roots have sprouted, your new succulent can either be replanted in succulent potting soil or allowed to remain submerged in water as illustrated above.

Offsets are little plants that develop at the base of the main specimen, and many species of succulents, such as aloe, hens and chicks, and some cacti, will generate them. Check for root growth after an offset has developed for two to three weeks before carefully twisting, cutting, or using a sharp knife to separate it from the main stem. Be cautious to prevent destroying any already-formed roots. Follow the directions above for propagating in soil or water, letting the offsets dry, establish roots, and then repot when they have had time to callus any exposed regions. Removing offsets has the added benefit of enhancing the health of your current succulents and redirecting energy into the growth of the primary plant.