How To Look After Succulents Outdoors

Although succulent plants can endure dry spells, they need constant watering during the growing season. Water deeply once the soil has dried to about two inches (5 cm) below the surface, then wait a few days before watering again.

Rot is the most frequent issue with succulents. This can be avoided by keeping the stems out of the soil and allowing drying times in between irrigations. Additionally, irrigate the plant from the base to keep the leaves dry.

Keep an eye out for bug problems and use water and horticultural soap spray to eliminate them.

During the maintenance of succulent garden plants, cut off dead stems and offsets. It is simple to start an offset as a brand-new plant. Offsets should be planted in a fresh part of the garden after being cared for in a well-drained potting mix until the roots are substantial and strong.

Succulents may be left outside.

Succulents are drought-tolerant plants because they can retain water in their large, irregularly shaped leaves. Succulents have a broad variety of eye-catching shapes and textures, which provide any landscape aesthetic interest. Can succulents live outside? is an often asked question. The quick response is “yes”! Growing succulents outdoors is an excellent alternative because they do well there and can withstand some neglect. They also do well in sunny areas with warm, dry weather.

Succulents can be grown in the ground, in pots, or hidden in unexpected planting locations. Take the uncertainty out of caring for these wonderful conversation pieces with stunning foliage by reading our suggestions for growing succulents outside.

Season

During the spring and summer, when succulents are actively growing, you’ll need to water them much more frequently. They rapidly extract water from the earth as they grow new stems, leaves, roots, and blossoms. Depending on the weather, such as the light and temperature, you might water them three times every week. Succulent plants go dormant in the winter. You won’t need to water them very much throughout the season because their growth has stopped. Giving a succulent too much water in the winter is one of the simplest ways to destroy it, so avoid using your watering can from November to March. Allow your succulent to rest peacefully in the desert.

Container Size

Because larger containers contain more soil, which retains moisture longer, they require less frequent watering. Small, shallow containers will require more regular watering because the soil dries out more quickly.

Succulents should go where outside, right?

It’s really simple to burn your succulents with too much heat or sunlight because there is so much more sunlight outside. Start your succulents in a fully shaded area and gradually move them to a more sunny location.

Larger and more established succulents can withstand more light and heat than smaller ones. Succulents that have just been planted, on the other hand, will require more time spent in the shadow.

Consider adding a couple more hours of sunlight every week. Succulents do best in chilly morning sun.

Make sure you are aware that there is shade all day. When I took my plants out this year, I burned a lot of them. On the east side of my house, I usually store my succulents on a wire rack. I figured the rack was shaded for the majority of the day because the roof overhang over it.

I was aware that it received some morning sun, but I was unaware that full sun doesn’t come until after 1:00 PM. For the majority of my plants, especially the leaves I was propagating, this was simply too much sun.

So, take heed of my error and keep them entirely in the shade for a few days as they adjust to the additional light and warmer weather. Move them to a location that receives morning sun after a few days in complete shadow. Then, transport them to their permanent residence after waiting a few more days.

Keep an eye out for early indicators of sunburn, such as bleaching or a drastic change in hue. Move your succulents back to a location with more shade if you notice these indicators.

Do outdoor succulents require sunlight?

Outdoor succulent cultivation might be beneficial to your plants. Succulents nearly always do better when left outside or given some outdoor time, even for brief periods of time, depending on the lighting, humidity, and temperature in your home. The following are some benefits of growing them outside:

a lot of daylight

The likelihood that your plants will receive enough sunlight is higher while growing outdoors. Some settings in your house might not have enough light to give your plants the sunshine they need, depending on the lighting conditions there. At least 4-6 hours of direct sunlight every day, or more, are necessary for succulents to thrive. Your plants will be exposed to the sun’s rays all day if you leave them outside, and you can nearly always count on them getting all the sunshine they require each day.

Rain Water

Your succulent plants will appear healthier, brighter, and much happier if you watch them after a nice rain. Your plants can benefit from the benefits of rainwater. They give your plants the essential nutrients and minerals they need while cleaning out and removing any unwanted buildup from tap water. By removing dust and other debris that can hinder photosynthesis, rainwater aids in the cleaning of plant leaves. When rain is predicted, I also prefer to move my container plants to locations where they may get a nice soaking from the rain. They will profit from the rainwater in this way. Collecting rainwater to use for later irrigation of plants and for watering indoor plants is a good idea.

The impact that precipitation had on my cactus plant was one of my biggest surprises. Last year, during the cold and rainy season, I worried about this cactus plant since I wasn’t sure if it would survive with all the wetness falling on it. This plant’s size doubled as it grew long and plump after the rains the previous year. Look at the dimpling where it developed and extended. Since then, I relocated this cactus plant, which you can see above in its own pot. It is then simpler to move and transport as necessary.

exposed to the elements of nature

To thrive, plants require fresh air. For breathing and photosynthesis, they require oxygen. A plant needs oxygen to grow. Over time, indoor plants may become oxygen-depleted from outside air, and noxious air may accumulate. Dust can build up on the leaves of indoor plants, obstructing the sunlight’s ability to reach the leaves and preventing the plants from breathing effectively. Plants will grow better if their leaves are kept clean and free of debris. Being outside also exposes plants to pollinators, which are essential to their survival in the wild, such bees and birds.

safeguarded against dogs and young children (and vice versa)

You can avoid the hassle of having to keep your pets and young children away from your plants by keeping them outside. Because they are naturally inquisitive, pets and young children might hurt your prized plants by trampling on them, leaping on them, treading on their pots, trampling on their leaves, etc. For a brief while, my young daughter would pick the leaves off of my plants. Thankfully, she quickly realized that this was very unacceptable and had broken the behavior.

In addition, some succulent plants can be poisonous to people and animals if consumed. Some succulents exude chemicals that are unpleasant or toxic to both people and animals. You can avoid the stress of worrying that your cherished pets will get hurt by eating or playing with your plants by keeping your succulents outside. Visit my post on “9 Succulent Plants Toxic To Cats, Dogs or Pets” to discover more about succulents that are toxic to animals.

Although there are numerous potential advantages to growing succulents outside, not everyone should do so. It’s also a good idea to be aware that keeping your plants outside exposes them to possible pests, insects, and animals that could harm them or spread illness.

Personally, I’ve planted succulents both inside and outside. My succulents do better outside because to my local climate and indoor lighting setup, though. Succulents can grow and flourish in a variety of conditions due to their extraordinary attributes and hardiness, which is part of their attraction and the reason we adore them so much.

Do you want to know where to buy succulents online? For suggestions, see my Resource Page.

Do succulents favor the indoors or outdoors?

Succulents, however, are hardy plants that may thrive in a variety of conditions, including neglect, little access to water, fast-draining soil, and a steady source of sunshine.

It’s excellent if you live somewhere where the weather is just right for them to thrive outside.

But if you don’t, you’ll need to make some alterations and adjustments.

These bizarre plants have evolved to survive in the worst conditions, including the wettest climates, little to no soil, and the steepest slopes.

A variety of surprises, including vibrant edges, tips, or complete shifts in foliage color, can be found in the sunlight or the chilly outdoors.

When succulents are grown outside, the weather will determine and set off when the plants are dormant or active, depending on the species. On the other hand, when it warms up, that can cause new births, color changes, or blooming.

Do I need to protect succulents from rain?

Healthy cacti and succulents won’t be harmed by a little rain. In reality, your garden can benefit from even a lot of rain. Succulents typically prefer infrequent, deep water. After a period of dryness or extreme heat, your plants may benefit greatly from a strong rain.

As designed by nature, rainwater provides moisture to your plants. Rainwater is devoid of chemicals like fluoride or chlorine, unlike tap water. Although these additions are meant to make the water safe for consumption by people, they are not the best choice for plants.

The water from your garden hose may contain a number of minerals that might affect the pH of your soil if you reside in an area with “hard” water. Similarly, softened water may have more salt than most plants would like.

Rainwater gives your succulents a refreshing shower in addition to being devoid of minerals and chemicals. The leaves of your plant will have easier access to sunlight thanks to the rain washing away the dust and dirt from them.

What time of day is ideal for watering succulent plants?

Because they are exposed to different environments outside, outdoor succulents require slightly different watering requirements than inside plants. Generally speaking, plants need to be watered every seven to ten days during the active growing season. Sense the moisture in the soil. Before watering, the top inch of the soil ought to be touchably dry. Thoroughly water the plants until some of the extra water begins to seep out of the holes. Excess water might not always drain out of the pot depending on the type of container and soil you are using. It ought to be enough as long as you watered deeply.

Water less frequently and more sparingly, typically every three to four weeks, during the dormant season. Although not absolutely bone-dry, the plant must feel dry to the touch. Keep an eye on your plants to observe if they begin to exhibit indicators that they require watering. It’s time to water your plants when their leaves begin to shrink and feel flat to the touch rather than full.

The ideal time to water is in the morning, especially for outside plants. As a result, the plant can dry out during the hot summer months. By watering early in the day, you can ensure that the water reaches the roots of your plants and that they are well hydrated for the afternoon heat. By allowing the plants to dry up before the stronger afternoon sun strikes them, watering in the morning also helps to prevent sunburn on the leaves of your plants.

How can I determine whether my succulent needs water?

Succulents are better off dry than wet, but that doesn’t mean you can ignore the need to water them. In fact, the plant needs water to survive, and much like people, it will exhibit dehydration symptoms. Your succulent clearly needs extra water if its leaves are wrinkled and shriveled.

The cells attempt to bring in more water to make up for the water that has been lost as they release their stored moisture to the rest of the plant. The cells shrink as they run out of water and the plant is forced to rely on its limited reserves, which causes the once-firm and full leaves to collapse and shrivel.

Why keep dying my succulent plants?

Overwatering and poorly draining soils are the main causes of succulent deaths. Succulents need the soil to dry out between waterings because they are drought-tolerant plants. Succulents get root rot in wet soil, which turns their leaves brown, black, or yellow and gives them a withering appearance.

While overwatering is the most frequent cause of dying succulents, there are several other potential causes as well:

Succulent plants typically die back when they are kept in environments that are drastically different from their native habitat.

Replicating some of the minimal rainfall, full or partial sun exposure, and stony, well-draining soil conditions will help revive dying succulents.

Can succulents endure direct sunlight?

Due to their drought tolerance and water-storing properties, which enable them to tolerate high heat and very harsh sun exposure, succulents have become well-known. This is true for the majority of succulent plants, however some cannot survive direct sunlight without protection, and if exposed to excessive heat, they may suffer sun damage. &nbsp

The best 10 succulents and cacti that will thrive in full sun are listed below. Some of these plants can withstand full sun exposure better than others.

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Succulents can they get too much sun?

Although photosynthesis requires sunshine, certain plants might receive too much of it. While some succulents can be grown in full sun (defined as 6+ hours of direct sunshine each day), not all of them can, and some may even suffer from too much sunlight. Sunburned leaves will appear brown or black and could start to shrink or callus. Moving your plant to a location with less exposure or intense light is the best technique to treat sunburn on that plant. While untouched areas of the plant will continue to be in good health, sunburned leaves will never fully recover.

By observing other leaf symptoms, you can tell sunburn from rot. A plant that has recently been exposed to the light will still have big, thick leaves that have started to turn black or brown but may still be glossy. Older sunburns will be dry, shriveled, or even fully desiccated, and they will be black or brown in color. The appearance of rotted and overly wet leaves will be mushy and wrinkled.

If a plant at the store or one you own has sunburn, it probably wasn’t properly cared for and was exposed to too much light at some point rather than being sick and dying rapidly. Remember that burnt segments frequently shrink up, so even though the plant may not seem attractive, it may still be healthy and continue to grow for many years. The easiest approach to avoid purchasing plants with sunburns is to only purchase them from local, independent nurseries and vendors rather than big-box retailers, where this kind of damage is more likely to be visible.

These advice should aid you in identifying and treating any problems that may exist with your succulents. For you to always bring home a plant that can be your companion for years to come, we’ll be showing you things to avoid when shopping for plants and succulents in our upcoming post!