How To Grow Succulents From Stem

In case you wished to propagate your own plants, we will start by explaining how to cut your succulents or cacti. What kind of cuttings you take will depend on the kind of succulent or cactus that you are cutting. While some plants can spread by a leaf, others require real cuttings to increase their size.

It’s crucial to obtain the full leaf, all the way up to the stem, if you’re trying to propagate utilizing a leaf. Your leaf will probably die if it is chopped or breaks off before the stem. Just twist the leaf to remove it from the stem; be sure to remove the entire leaf.

Use sharp scissors or pruning shears if you’re taking a full cutting to propagate your succulent. Just above a leaf, cut the stem. You have a choice of taking your cutting from the succulent’s stem or an offshoot.

What you cut for cactus cuttings depends depend on the kind of cactus you have. If the pads on your cactus are growing, pick a mature pad—not a tiny one at the top—and clip it. You should clip a columnar cactus a few inches from the top if you have one. Try to select a thinner stem for columnar cacti as they will root more quickly than thicker ones. You should make your cut as straight as you can.

How can stems be used to grow succulent plants?

I make a lot of movies and posts about succulents because I have a lot of them in my yard. They are perennial gifts, so to speak. You can simply cut them to acquire more.

Because the vast majority of succulents spread in the same manner, I wanted to write one post that you could refer to whenever I write about a particular succulent. These are the two incredibly simple methods.

Let me demonstrate how to grow succulents:

I usually divide succulents using stem cuttings. Ensure the sharpness and cleanliness of your pruners. Simply trim the stems to the desired length, remove the bottom third of the leaves, and then wait 2 weeks to 4 months before planting them to heal off (the cut end of the stem will callus over).

I either plant them straight in the ground or in a pot with planting mix for succulents and cacti. I use one that is made nearby; it’s also good. Succulents require a loose mixture so that the water can drain completely and prevent rot.

I rarely use individual leaf cuttings to propagate succulents, but it’s still simple. Lay the leaf on top of the mixture after removing it from the stem, making sure to remove the entire leaf all the way to the stem. Off the cut end, there will be a new plantlet.

I suppose I could propagate succulents in my sleep because I do it so frequently! Although many succulents make excellent houseplants, mine all grow outside. If you have just one or two of these bizarre plants, you can easily grow more using these simple methods.

Aloe Vera must be multiplied by division, which involves removing the pups from the mother plant.

Step 2:

Directly insert the branch or offshoot into the potting soil. Remove a few of the nearby leaves before pushing the branch deeply into the ground to support it as it develops roots for branches. If feasible, cut off a few of the outer leaves from offshoots before planting the base of the offshoot in the soil.

Can a broken stem of a succulent be grown?

Succulents spring to mind when discussing indoor plants in the first instance. If you purchased one, I wouldn’t be shocked if you had the same thought. Although it has been said that some plants can be resilient, that doesn’t mean that they are impervious to harm.

Depending on the damage, a broken-off succulent may be saved. You can just wait three days for the leaves to dry if they start to fall. Keep the stem away until it becomes calloused if it has been severed. If you put it on cactus soil after noticing these changes, it will develop roots within a few weeks.

Succulents that have broken can still be saved, however it depends on the circumstances. We’ll go over every one of them in great detail so you can understand how to preserve succulents and even assist in their multiplication. Stay tuned because we’ll also provide advice on protecting succulents from harm.

Can succulent cuttings be planted directly in the ground?

What is there to love other than a succulent? Obviously, a full garden of succulents! Fortunately for us, it’s simple to propagate a variety of these resilient, vibrant plants at home. We can’t wait to see succulents growing all year long in containers around the house and garden; there are various easy ways to reproduce them.

Propagating by Division: Plants that have gotten too leggy perform best with this method, which produces new succulents from cuttings. Start by delicately removing any leaves that may be attached to the stem below the rosette; be sure to preserve the leaf’s base while you do so. After all the leaves have been eliminated, cut the rosette with shears, leaving a brief stem intact. The cuttings should be let to dry in an empty tray for a few days until the raw ends have calloused. The cuttings can then be rooted in either water or soil.

Soil: After the stems have calloused, set the cuttings on top of a shallow tray filled with well-draining cactus/succulent soil. From the base of the cuttings, roots and little plants will start to emerge in a few weeks. Once the roots start to show, water sparingly once a week; take care not to overwater. The parent leaf will eventually wither; carefully remove it while taking care not to harm the young roots. Your propagated succulents can be replanted once they have established roots. As soon as the plants are established, keep them out of direct sunlight.

Water: After the stem has calloused, place a cutting with the end barely visible above the water’s surface on the lip of a glass or jar filled with water. Pick a sunny location for your glass. The incision will eventually produce roots that extend toward the water. Once roots have sprouted, your new succulent can either be replanted in succulent potting soil or allowed to remain submerged in water as illustrated above.

Offsets are little plants that develop at the base of the main specimen, and many species of succulents, such as aloe, hens and chicks, and some cacti, will generate them. Check for root growth after an offset has developed for two to three weeks before carefully twisting, cutting, or using a sharp knife to separate it from the main stem. Be cautious to prevent destroying any already-formed roots. Follow the directions above for propagating in soil or water, letting the offsets dry, establish roots, and then repot when they have had time to callus any exposed regions. Removing offsets has the added benefit of enhancing the health of your current succulents and redirecting energy into the growth of the primary plant.

How can you root succulents the quickest?

So, you may be wondering how to quickly propagate succulents. I can relate to both the joy and frustration of watching a new plant develop.

Since I’ve been growing succulents for a few years, allow me to give you some advice on how to quickly propagate your succulents as well as some alternative techniques you can try.

Stem cuttings are the simplest and quickest method of propagating succulents. If the plant is a fresh cutting from the mother plant, it will already have a strong foundation from which to build its new root system. Another instance is when you cut off the succulent’s top portion because it has been stretched out significantly (etiolation), this stem will likewise give rise to numerous new plantlings (pups). Due to its existing root system, the plant will also have a great possibility of producing more offset and growing quickly.

Always check that the stem cuttings are a respectable size for the plant’s typical size.

According to my experience, I always want to make sure that the succulent has a lot of nodes where the leaves attach to the stem and a lot of leaves in its stem. Once the succulent is put in soil, these stem nodes will form roots, and the leaves will serve as the succulent’s water source until its root system matures.

Prepare the Pot

You can cultivate cuttings in a temporary pot while they establish roots or plant them directly in a permanent container. In either case, you’ll need a pot with a drainage hole that’s big enough to give each cutting 2 to 3 inches of space.

To shield your succulents from standing water and root rot, fill the container with a grittier, well-draining soil. Cactus/succulent potting soil is typically available at garden centers. Alternatively, you can create your own by mixing 3 parts potting soil with 2 parts coarse, salt-free sand and 1 part perlite or pumice.

Plant the Cuttings

Insert the cut end of a stem 1 to 2 inches into the ground. If the succulent has leaves, you might need to remove a few of them to reveal the stem’s base. The lowest leaves shouldn’t contact the soil; they should rest just above it. To help the cutting stand straight, softly compact the dirt around it.

Remove any necessary leaves from stemmed succulents to expose 1 to 2 inches of stem for planting.

Pick the Right Location

Choose an area with enough of airflow, bright indirect light (not direct outdoor sun), and succulents that are still young. Cuttings require sunshine to develop new roots, but direct sunlight might cause them to quickly dry up. On indoor succulents, good airflow helps avoid gnat and mealy insect infestations.

Water

Cuttings require constant hydration until they can form roots, unlike mature succulents. Water the soil just enough to prevent it from drying up, but not too much that there is standing water. Actual frequency varies depending on humidity and temperature but is often 2-4 times each week.

Care for Rooted Succulents

A very slight pull will reveal whether a cutting has roots after 4-6 weeks. Change to deeper, less frequent watering for succulents with roots. Water just once the soil is completely dry, which takes about 2-4 times each month. If necessary, repot the succulent and relocate it gradually to the right lighting. Don’t increase light exposure for 1-2 weeks to give the plant time to adjust. Maintain your succulent’s care, and in the upcoming months, keep an eye out for above-ground development.

What You’ll Need:

  • slicing shears
  • gardening mitts (for handling spiny varieties)
  • a little trowel
  • potting soil for cacti and succulents
  • jars with sufficient drainage holes

Remove Some Leaves or Behead

Take a few leaves at random from your succulent plant, gently twisting each one off the stem without breaking it.

These can be cut off the bottom of the stem, which will be discarded, when it begins to grow lanky.

To remove a specific leaf from a plant, such as a Christmas cactus, you might need to use scissors.

If you’re “beheading,” cut the stem of the plant head cleanly with your scissors or clippers about an inch below the lower leaves.

Plant

When roots start to form, either choose a site in your garden that is ideal for planting or fill well-draining containers of your choosing with potting material.

Sunshine and well-drained soil are ideal for succulent growth. They get paler in the absence of sunlight, and they decompose in excess moisture.

When the sun is less powerful, such as in the early morning or late afternoon, plant in a sunny location.

To lift the cuttings above the edge of your container or garden surface, pile dirt higher. To stabilize the roots, gently tamp the earth down; do not water.

Water and Feed

It’s time to buy a succulent/cactus food at this stage, such as Miracle-Gro Succulent Plant Food, which is sold on Amazon. administer as directed by the manufacturer.

Succulents can also be propagated via cuttings that are placed on top of potting soil and allowed to callus off so they can root themselves in the soil.

What are some uses for succulent stems?

Once a succulent has grown out, it is impossible to return to the initial plant. However, you can “repair the plant by reviving it and cultivating a new one from the cuttings and leaves. Call propagation is this procedure.

It can be a little unsettling to propagate a plant that you’ve worked so hard to nurture and develop. The good news is that some of the easiest plants to reproduce are succulents. What you should know is as follows.

Assess the Plant

Before reproducing a succulent, it’s a good idea to be aware of its species. While some species can be multiplied from both cuttings and leaves, others can only be multiplied from cuttings.

Before attempting to propagate the plant, you need also make sure that it is healthy and receiving adequate water. The best leaves are those that are plump and healthy; any leaves that are overwatered or dry won’t have a high success rate for producing new growth.

Remove Some Leaves

Make sure you can clearly see the stem of your succulent before attempting to cut it down. You might already have a beautiful piece of the stem to deal with if the plant grows quickly or has leaves that are extremely widely spaced apart.

Start by removing any dead leaves if your stem isn’t particularly visible. Once you have a clean break, move a few leaves back and forth starting at the bottom of the plant. (If the leaves come off without tearing and in good condition, you can store them to use as seed later on to grow more plants.)

Cut Stem at Soil Level

Take a clean pair of sharp shears or scissors and cut the stem at soil level once you have a clear view of the stem. It can feel unsettling and wrong, but don’t be alarmed. Unbelievably, forcing new growth on the lower area of the succulent by removing the top.

The lower part of the clipped stem should be left in the ground. Before watering, let the wound dry up for about a week to avoid any decaying. When the soil is dry after that, water every several days. Baby plants will begin to erupt from the stem’s clipped top in a few weeks, replacing it.

Pot the Top Stem

What should you do with your plant now that the top has been removed? Don’t throw it away because it can be potted and grown into a separate plant.

You must give the wound enough time to dry out in order to prevent it from rotting from moisture, just as the bottom of the stem. After a few days, cut the stem’s side leaves, leaving the top rosette alone, and put it in the ground up to the bottom leaf. When the soil is dry, water a couple times per week.

When the stem eventually develops roots, you will have a complete second plant.

If you want to view the whole procedure, have a peek at this fantastic video.