How To Do A Succulent Arrangement

Recently, I’ve received several inquiries from folks wondering how much room should exist between the succulents in their arrangement. The reply is, “It depends.” Succulents are perfectly capable of being planted quite near to one another.

Succulents grow more slowly when planted closely together, helping the arrangement to better maintain its original layout. When they are close together, watering them can be more difficult. But this is a really fantastic approach to plant your succulents, particularly if you’re creating the arrangement as a present or for an event.

A nice illustration of succulents that are firmly packed together is this clam shell planter at Waterwise Botanicals.

Succulents are generally slow growers, but if you give them a bit extra room to spread out, they’ll grow a little faster and eventually fill the space. If you want your plants to grow larger or reproduce more readily on their own, this is a fantastic alternative. I suggest using this slightly dispersed strategy if you are just getting started with succulents.

It is simpler to water the succulents correctly when there is room between the plants. The soil will dry up more quickly due to the improved air flow. We are aware that succulents thrive in rapidly draining soil!

Remember that you don’t want the succulents to be too close together or in a pot that is much bigger than they are.

Succulents will prioritize generating roots over growing larger if they are given too much room. A good distance between plants, in my opinion, is between 1/2 and 1.

Step 1: Insert foam, and fill in empty spaces with moss.

You’ll see that I didn’t use all of the desert foam in the container. Instead, I filled in the gaps with moss and angled the stems of my succulent plants into the foam.

This green Spanish moss was picked because it doesn’t compete with the vibrant artificial succulents.

Step 3: Insert faux succulent stems into foam bricks.

I used wire cutters to trim the stems of the succulents so that they were flush with the foam foundation. Try alternating hues (reds, greens, and blues) and styles for greater aesthetic appeal (cascading versus upright).

Based on the succulents and planter you select, the finished item will resemble this…

Here is how the succulent arrangement currently appears in my living room:

Can succulents be grown in just rocks?

It should be obvious that succulents will thrive when planted in rocks given these circumstances. They drain very well and do not retain water, which eliminates the possibility of root rot. This does not include another component of soil, though, since all plants need nutrients.

Although succulents are not particularly hungry plants, they do need certain nutrients to grow. Other micronutrients like zinc or iron are needed in smaller levels, whereas macronutrients like nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium are essential. The plant won’t grow at all or last very long without these nutrients.

By their very nature, rocks don’t release nutrients quickly enough to keep the plants alive. They are composed of minerals, but since they decompose so slowly over time, they are not appropriate for growing on their own. Additionally, they often don’t retain enough moisture, allowing the roots to quickly dry out after draining practically instantly.

Sadly, this means that succulents cannot thrive permanently without soil in rocks. If not given regular care, they may survive for several weeks or even months on the nutrients found in the stems and leaves.

How is a succulent decorated?

Despite the fact that most people appreciate having live plants in their homes, they don’t have any because they are worried they would kill them and lose their purpose. Decorate with succulents to bring some greenery into your room. They are a simple plant to grow and are available in a huge range of forms and hues of green. I’m offering a collection of 13 suggestions for using succulents in your home decor to encourage you to cultivate succulents.

I recently demonstrated how to grow succulents in a cigar box. I embellished my succulent planter with some moss and little seashells. The task at hand is incredibly simple to finish.

This hanging globe terrariums project is one of my favorite planting endeavors. Choosing the teeny succulents that go inside is so much fun. For added appeal, I once more added a few tiny seashells.

I adore Carolyn’s assignment: glitter stenciled succulent pots. I must attempt to make these!

Using items from the thrift store, DIY Inspired demonstrates how to create adorable succulent pots.

Craftberry Bush created adorable driftwood planters for succulents, which she then put on the wall.

These ombre pots from The Dempster Logbook are so adorable! Pretty adorable, no? There are so many varieties of succulents to pick from!

In little containers, succulents look so attractive. These were embellished by DIY Candy using Sharpies, then once the succulents were planted, glass marbles were added.

Terra clay pots were painted with white and gold paint by Pastels & Macarons before having small cactus placed inside.

From Country Chic Cottage, these faux succulent pots hang on the wall. I’ve seen these built using real succulents, but hanging them on the wall makes it hard to water them. adore these

These incredibly lovely succulent magnets were also produced by Country Chic Cottage. She is so shrewd!

These foam sheet succulents from Craftberry Bush are another inventive creation. She reveals the recipe!

See how to make this unique wreath at Finding Silver Pennies. It’s not your typical wreath.

Growth needs

There are so many different kinds of succulents. A general rule of thumb is to select succulents with comparable requirements if you want to arrange them. They will coexist peacefully and preserve the ensemble’s aesthetic for a very long time.

For instance, Graptosedum California Sunset grows best in the summer, whilst Crassula (Jades) prefers the winter. So planting them together wouldn’t be a good idea. You should take into account the growing season, hydration requirements, lighting requirements, and soil requirements while choosing succulent combos.

Agave, Echeveria, and Sempervivum are several succulents that go dormant in the winter and look fantastic together. Aeonium, Aloe, Graptopetalum, and Kalanchoe may come to mind if you want to group the summer-dormant succulents.

Height

In addition to the succulents’ characteristics, height and color must also be taken into account in order to arrange them harmoniously. You should have a thriller, filler, and spiller in your layout.

Use tall succulents to provide height to the thriller and enhance the overall design. As filler around them, use shorter succulents. To finish the arrangement, add a few “spiller trailing succulents.” The recipe is straightforward, and you can always add your own spin to make it appear appealing to you.

Color

Choosing a theme for your succulent arrangement is simple. There are a variety of succulents that may make your succulent arrangements appear fantastic, whether you want them to be colorful or monochromatic.

Monochromatic, similar, and complementary color combinations are the three most common types.

You must group succulents with the same colors but various shades together for a monochromatic arrangement.

When using similar settings, you will group colors that are adjacent to one another on the color wheel (orange, yellow, and green).

Contrasting colors on the color wheel are required for complementary color schemes (red and green).

Can succulent cuttings be planted directly in the ground?

What is there to love other than a succulent? Obviously, a full garden of succulents! Fortunately for us, it’s simple to propagate a variety of these resilient, vibrant plants at home. We can’t wait to see succulents growing all year long in containers around the house and garden; there are various easy ways to reproduce them.

Propagating by Division: Plants that have gotten too leggy perform best with this method, which produces new succulents from cuttings. Start by delicately removing any leaves that may be attached to the stem below the rosette; be sure to preserve the leaf’s base while you do so. After all the leaves have been eliminated, cut the rosette with shears, leaving a brief stem intact. The cuttings should be let to dry in an empty tray for a few days until the raw ends have calloused. The cuttings can then be rooted in either water or soil.

Soil: After the stems have calloused, set the cuttings on top of a shallow tray filled with well-draining cactus/succulent soil. From the base of the cuttings, roots and little plants will start to emerge in a few weeks. Once the roots start to show, water sparingly once a week; take care not to overwater. The parent leaf will eventually wither; carefully remove it while taking care not to harm the young roots. Your propagated succulents can be replanted once they have established roots. As soon as the plants are established, keep them out of direct sunlight.

Water: After the stem has calloused, place a cutting with the end barely visible above the water’s surface on the lip of a glass or jar filled with water. Pick a sunny location for your glass. The incision will eventually produce roots that extend toward the water. Once roots have sprouted, your new succulent can either be replanted in succulent potting soil or allowed to remain submerged in water as illustrated above.

Offsets are little plants that develop at the base of the main specimen, and many species of succulents, such as aloe, hens and chicks, and some cacti, will generate them. Check for root growth after an offset has developed for two to three weeks before carefully twisting, cutting, or using a sharp knife to separate it from the main stem. Be cautious to prevent destroying any already-formed roots. Follow the directions above for propagating in soil or water, letting the offsets dry, establish roots, and then repot when they have had time to callus any exposed regions. Removing offsets has the added benefit of enhancing the health of your current succulents and redirecting energy into the growth of the primary plant.

How do you start a collection of plants?

Only with the owner of the property on which they are found may you legally collect plants. Permits are often only given by government organizations in charge of managing property to researchers employed by recognized institutions like universities. If requested, private landowners are frequently open to prudent collecting. Do not illegally collect.

Take the entire plant, including the roots, or even more than one if the plant is small. If possible, obtain a branch that is about 10 inches long, has leaves, blossoms, and fruit. The identification of a “sterile” specimen (one with only leaves) could be challenging. If that’s all you can find, even an old, empty seed capsule can be helpful.

The specific location and date the plant was harvested are given. Note anything that the specimen cannot display, such as the plant’s size, blossom color, whether or not it is woody, etc. Note the type of location the plant was discovered, such as in gravel at a stream’s edge, in shade behind live oaks, or in a crack in the pavement outside a Walmart. We might want to store your plant in the herbarium if you bring it to the museum for identification. If yes, we’ll need all the details you’re able to provide for the label. You must print your labels on acid-free bond paper if you’re going to make them for us.

Put the sample into a sheet of folded newspaper. On the newspaper, note the date and the collection location. Place the plant in such a way that all of its elements are visible; for instance, avoid placing the blossoms between leaf layers. Use corrugated cardboard to divide the specimens so that air may circulate (and blotters or paper towels to absorb moisture, if you like). Place the stack between two pieces of wood and secure it with straps or a heavy object on top. Place the stack in an area with sufficient airflow since air, not heat, dries plants. Avoid cooking them.

Check the plants every day, and replace blotters as necessary. When the plants are dry, remove them from the stack (stiff and no longer cool to the touch). Dried plant specimens can be kept pest-free in a tightly-sealed plastic bag and frozen for three to four days to kill insects.

Can you grow succulents and cacti together?

The majority of cacti and succulents need a lot of light. They are appropriate for the sunniest areas of your house. You will be giving them what they enjoy if you construct some shelves across a sunny window. To ensure that every side of the plant receives an equal amount of sunny exposure, you should turn the plants frequently.

Every garden center has a fantastic selection of succulents and cacti that you can grow indoors. Some cacti are offered as seasonal or gift plants in department stores, such as the Schlumbergera x buckleyi (Christmas cactus), a species that grows in forests. Because it takes years for this to happen, it is better to purchase cacti that are currently in bloom. You should inspect them to ensure that there are no signs of rot or parts that are shriveled or dried, and that they are sound overall. When you bring them home, make sure they are not exposed to drafts and that they are the perfect size for their pot.

Make sure the desert cactus you buy are placed in compost that has been well-drained. In the spring and summer, they need to be regularly irrigated with tepid water. However, during the winter, especially if they are in cool temperatures, the compost should be allowed to almost entirely dry. As a result, the cactus can hibernate.

Cacti should be fed around every three weeks when they are actively growing. For this, you can use tomato fertilizer that has been properly diluted. Additionally, desert cactus like wintertime temperatures of 50–55 F (10–13 C). Only when the roots completely fill the pot do desert cacti need to be repotted.

Cacti in the forest are significantly different. Typically, they produce lovely, dangling flowers at the tips of segmented stalks. These stems resemble chains of supple leaves. They have been bred to grow over trees, which is why they grow in this manner. Although they are accustomed to shade, they do require intense light. They require light, well-drained, lime-free compost that is also misted with lukewarm, gentle water. In 50 to 55 F, they can relax (10-13 C.). After the winter, give them a little water, feed them once a week with a little fertilizer, and put them in a room with greater temperatures.

There are at least 50 different plant families that can be categorized as succulents. In the summer, they should receive unlimited irrigation, but only when their compost starts to dry out. They can endure wintertime temperatures of about 50 F. (10 C.). Every few weeks during the summer, you should fertilize with a well-diluted fertilizer because they prefer fresh air to humidity.

Succulents, woodland cactus, and desert cacti can all coexist in the same garden. They provide beautiful presentations for your collection of indoor plants. Even if they don’t require much care, you still need to be aware of their likes and needs.