How To Care For A Large Cactus

Give them a drink, but not too much, and take long intermissions. “Because they store water in their stems, cacti are famed for surviving with little to no watering. That doesn’t imply they don’t require any watering, either. Make sure to inspect the soil periodically. It’s time to water the plant if the top two to three inches of soil are dry “says Palomares.

Thon reiterates Palomares’ counsel and adds: “The temptation to over-water cactus can cause root rot and scab, which manifests as rusty-colored, corky regions on the stems, which is why most people fail at growing cacti. My recommendation is to under-water; you can typically bring them back from the dehydration stage without any problems.”

How is a huge cactus maintained?

With their striking shapes of all kinds and stunning color variations, cacti are among the world’s most distinctive and lovely plants. They go well with a variety of home decor themes, including minimalist, boho, and, of course, anything with a southwestern influence! Who hasn’t had the need to collect each and every one of the miniature cactus plants on display and take them home? Plants require proper care once they have been adopted because they are more than just static decoration. Cactus plant care isn’t tough, but it is a little special, just like the plants themselves! Below are our top five suggestions.

Location Observation

You may probably imagine what type of environment cactus prefer since they typically grow in desert climates! Sunlight in plenty. But take care! Even cactus can burn, particularly if they are in full sunshine and positioned behind a glass window, which intensifies the effects of the sun. The best window is one that faces south. You may need to move your cactus to a cooler location if you see that the side facing the sun is beginning to turn yellow or brown.

Keep your cactus in a bright area of the house, such as one with artificial lighting. You can put your cactus outside on the patio throughout the summer to take advantage of the intense summer sun.

Hydration Fixation

For many plant owners, watering cacti plants has been a worrying thought. We are aware that they require water because they are plants, but we have also been warned about providing them with excessive amounts of water because they originate from the desert. Cacti actually require regular waterings; they only have a particular defense against drought.

The need of water cannot be overstated if you want your cactus to grow. You can feed them water once a week if they are in a sunny area with good daytime heat. The sole need is that the soil be completely dry between waterings. This will prevent the plant’s bottom margins and roots from rotting or becoming wet.

You can use less water in the winter because there is less sun and it gets colder at night during this season, which causes cactus to go dormant.

Flirt with the Dirt

A variety of cacti species are grown together in a container garden to create an oasis of lovely plants, and these gardens are highly popular. This frequently necessitates repotting the cacti! Consider the type of soil you’re using in the new container in addition to constantly wearing thick gloves (or using salad tongs to pick up and handle the cactus). Cacti prefer their own distinctive flavor of dirt, thus it must be highly efficient at draining surplus water. Many nurseries and flower stores sell bags of cactus soil, which is sandier and rockier than standard potting soil. This is necessary to ensure that the water drains and doesn’t keep the cactus damp.

Plotted and Potted

Take a close look at the container you are selecting before you repot the cactus. The best option is undoubtedly a container with drainage holes, as you won’t have to worry about the bottom collecting water. Cacti can, however, also be grown in containers without drainage holes; it just requires a little more attention. Always check the soil before watering to make sure it is completely dry. To avoid unintentionally drowning your cacti, another alternative is to meter the water you use. Depending on the season, a 1/4 to 1/2 cup per week or two is sufficient to ensure the health of your cactus.

In the Mood for Food

Fertilizer can be quite beneficial for cacti, and there are specific types with the nutrients they require. (An additional excellent alternative for a well-balanced supper is a 10-10-10 fertilizer.) Since they love to be fed in little quantities frequently, you can fertilize them sparingly with each watering during the summer growing season. In the winter, decrease your efforts to give the plants time to recuperate.

BONUS TIPDress up Your Cacti

Cacti are lovely guys on their own, but it’s always fun to give them a little makeover! From a lovely pot with extra personality to organic accents. Traditional containers for these desert-dwelling plants are made of terra cotta or clay, although a glass terrarium-style planter or ceramic dish can also be used. We enjoy placing stones and pebbles of various sizes and colors on top of the ground. We also include wood, sand, and big rocks. Make sure you can still use a finger or a moisture meter to determine if the soil is dry or not.

Browse through our collection of cactus! We enjoy potting up lovely planters filled with varied succulent and cactus species and celebrating the uniqueness of each individual plant.

Don’t be reluctant to adopt some of these beautiful plants now that you are an authority on cactus maintenance! Have fun picking out your favorites and bringing new companions home to make your own lovely and joyful cactus gardens.

How often should a large cactus be watered?

The most frequent reason for cacti failure is improper watering, whether it is done too much or too little. Cacti have evolved to store water for extended periods of time and can maintain moisture through droughts because they are endemic to arid regions and dry temperatures. They have a limited capacity, which is why over-watering can result in a variety of issues.

When it comes to regularity, watering your cacti will largely depend on the season but also on the variety. Checking the soil is the easiest technique to determine whether your cactus needs water: It’s time for a drink if the top inch is dry. That entails applying the “soak and dry procedure” on cactus.

What is the soak and dry method?

The soak and dry technique is thoroughly wetting the soil until part of it begins to flow out the drainage hole, then waiting until the mixture is nearly dry before wetting it once more. If done properly, this strategy will help them endure a period of under-watering should you need to travel or leave the house because it takes use of their natural tendency to store water (or if you just get busy and watering falls to the wayside, as happens to all of us now and again).

Watering during the growing season versus the inactive season

Like with many houseplants, the season affects how frequently you need water. It becomes more crucial that you get in the habit of examining the soil to determine whether your cacti are thirsty. A healthy cactus needs watering every one to two weeks during the growing season, according to general wisdom. The frequency changes to once every three to four weeks during the off-season.

Even then, it’s crucial to examine the soil. The same way that not all interior spaces and not all cacti are alike. The only way to be certain that your cactus require watering is to carefully examine the soil to determine how dry it is because there are so many different factors.

Can a large cactus survive inside?

Unexpectedly, keeping cactus happy indoors may be challenging, especially for people who have a tendency to ‘love’ their houseplants too much (we’re looking at you, over-waterers!).

Cacti are desert plants, so keep in mind that they can go for months (yes, months!) without water if necessary. A cactus should never be overwatered; the opposite is always true.

Large cacti need a south-facing site and at least six hours of direct sunshine each day to grow indoors.

Cacti are watered either from the top or the bottom.

Cactuses need regular summertime hydration to grow and stay healthy, but if you overwater it or mist it too frequently, it could rot from the base up.

Follow the advice of knowledgeable cactus growers and water from the bottom. Put the potted cactus in a shallow saucer that is half-filled with water every week during hot weather, or whenever the pot feels light, and leave it there for approximately a half-hour or until it soaks up the water. Enough water will be absorbed by the soil for the plant. Furthermore, since the majority of the moisture will be near the pot’s bottom, deep rooting will be promoted.

How can you spot a dying cactus?

When a cactus looks shriveled and husk-like, it is dead. Additionally, dead cacti can become unstable in their soil and topple over. They could start to smell rancid and becoming mushy, both of which are indicators that they are rotting. Cacti that are dead lose their spines and frequently appear brown.

Do I need to water my cactus?

The watering needs of cacti and succulents varies slightly from those of other plants.

Succulents and cacti don’t need as much water to survive as other types of houseplants because they resemble desert plants.

That does not imply that you should skip watering dried-out succulents. But many individuals question if misting succulent and cactus plants occasionally is appropriate.

Succulents and cacti shouldn’t be misted when being watered because it can weaken the roots and promote fungus. Do not shower succulents and cacti with a spray bottle. Spray misting is not only insufficient in terms of water supply; it also runs the risk of making the plants rot.

While it is not advised to spray these plants, there are a few circumstances in which you should sprinkle cacti and succulents.

A cactus needs how much sunlight?

Succulents and cacti typically require between 10 and 14 hours of light every day.

However, there are several things that affect how much light you should provide! What kind of light is it? Is it man-made or natural? Is the light direct or indirect?

You should at the very least be aware of whether your succulent prefers full sun, full shade, or a combination of the two. If you’re unsure, you can presume the plant needs full sun. Cacti and succulents in general are!

Ever questioned why you couldn’t simply leave the lights on all the time? That would imply that it is constantly expanding, right?

Actually, not quite. Like people, plants also require rest. Particularly in the case of desert flora. They engage in CAM photosynthesis, a unique type of photosynthesis. They truly only produce plant food at night, unlike other plants. They would starve if the darkness didn’t exist.

How should a cactus be watered properly?

Only water cacti when the soil in the potting container is almost entirely dry. Saturate the soil and, if you can, stay away from the leaves when watering. When you notice water dripping from the potting vessel’s drainage holes, stop watering.

A cactus plant kept indoors needs watering every 10 days or more during the spring and summer. Cacti only need to be watered every 4 to 6 weeks in the winter.

Typically, underwatered cactus plants will exhibit the following symptoms:

  • Deflated, rubbery, and pale leaves
  • a color difference on the stems and leaves
  • the leaves are fading
  • drop-dead leaves
  • Dryness on the touch and in appearance
  • The pot’s lighter weight

Avoid spraying the leaves and foliage of cacti in general. This frequently causes stagnant water to accumulate on the leaves, which can hasten the spread of fungus infections.

When watering your cactus plants, try to use either rainwater or distilled water. The water that comes out of the tap is frequently overly chlorinated and contains undesirable elements and minerals that can accumulate in the soil.

Where should cacti be placed indoors?

As long as they are placed in an area that receives at least 4 to 6 hours of sunshine every day, cacti can be cultivated indoors. To ensure they are etiolated, we advise rotating them daily in your brightest windowsill, which is typically a southeast-facing window.

When should my cactus be repotted?

If you notice roots protruding from the container’s bottom, it’s time to repot your cactus. This suggests that it is excessively root-bound. The majority of cacti enjoy being in small areas and can remain in their container for many years. You’ll know it has grown too much and needs repotting when you see roots.

Since they prefer it snug, the container in the next larger size will be suitable. Repotting should be done every two to four years as a general rule. The latter is preferable if you fertilize annually, but if you don’t, you should repot after two years to restore soil fertility. The optimal time is in January or February, when there is active growth.