How To Bring Succulents Indoors For Winter

Making sure succulents receive adequate sunshine indoors, especially during the winter, is one of the most challenging aspects of indoor succulent gardening.

Your succulents should be placed next to the room’s brightest window. The ideal window will receive all-day, brilliant indirect light.

This is crucial because the days are shorter in the winter. To retain their shape inside, succulents require at least 8 hours of bright, indirect sunlight each day.

Your succulents may start to spread out or lean toward the window during the winter months when there are a lot of gray or cloudy days. They aren’t getting enough light, as evidenced by this.

You can rotate your succulents in this situation to help correct any leaning. However, you will need to supplement with a grow light to avoid stretching.

Make sure the lights aren’t on all the time because succulents require darkness at night to complete their normal growth cycle.

At the conclusion of the winter, you can take off the tops and propagate any succulents that do start to stretch out or get tall and lanky. After that, you’ll have an abundance of summertime plants!

This is best done in the spring because most succulents don’t grow as quickly throughout the winter. Check out my post on extending succulents for more information on how to achieve this.

How are succulents wintered indoors?

Lighting is the most important aspect of wintertime indoor maintenance for succulent plants. Many require little water over the winter while they are dormant. However, certain succulents grow best in the winter and require water, nourishment, and even pruning. Learn the names of your plants so you can investigate their specific requirements and cater to them appropriately. When bringing indoor plants in the fall, if you’re unsure of which ones you have, cease feeding and watering them.

Your plants may occasionally receive enough light from a bright south or southwest window to survive the winter indoors. They probably require additional light if they start to tense up or appear pale. Owners of succulents frequently purchase grow light systems. In certain pieces, the shelving has built-in lighting. In some situations, fluorescent illumination is effective, but the plants need to be positioned within a few inches (5 cm) from the bulb. Online retailers offer many grow light systems with a wider depth range. Experts advise 14 to 16 hours of light each day for succulent care during the winter.

Succulents need to be placed in a bright environment with similar lighting to what they received outside in order to receive the proper winter care indoors. Place them away from drafts, but make sure there is adequate airflow.

Before bringing succulents inside to overwinter, clean the soil. Replant them if they are not in a suitable, quick-draining soil. Check for pests while clearing the soil of dead leaves. Before bringing succulents indoors for the winter, be sure your plants are healthy.

Succulents are occasionally grown as annual plants that are either allowed to flourish outside or not. You might be taken aback occasionally by a mild winter and hardy plants. Keeping soft succulents dry is essential for keeping them alive outside. For planting, a quick-draining, grippy mixture is essential. However, cold-hardy succulents that are properly planted in the soil can survive outdoors and thrive once more in the spring.

Succulents can they endure the cold inside?

Many of the most popular and stunning succulents will need to be taken indoors for the winter unless you are fortunate enough to live in a place where it does not get below freezing. Although a greenhouse is ideal, few gardeners have access to one. Fortunately, it’s simple to overwinter most succulents inside.

There is a vast variety of various plants classified as succulents, some of which have very particular requirements. But the advice provided here will help most widely cultivated succulents survive the winter.

When grown inside, succulents frequently develop a habit of being stretched out and lanky, producing weak and unsightly plants by spring. When care for succulents indoors throughout the winter, light, water, and temperature are three crucial considerations that can help to reduce this.

Light is Critical

Light is the main component in succulent survival during the winter. Succulents will extend if there is insufficient light in an effort to get closer to the source. In general, succulents want full sun. Although it can be challenging to do so inside, expose them to as much direct sunshine as you can. The ideal window is one that faces south, though east or west windows can also be used.

If there is inadequate natural light, fluorescent lights may be employed. It’s crucial to keep the plants between the bulbs and 1 to 2 inches away from them. Over a distance of 3 inches, fluorescent light is practically useless to plants. For plant growth, incandescent lights emit the wrong spectrum of light and becoming too hot.

Succulents Need Little Water During the Winter

It is always preferable for succulents to be too dry than too moist. This is particularly true in the winter, when plants experience less-than-ideal lighting conditions and below-average temperatures. During the winter, keep your succulents on the dry side. Just enough water should be provided to prevent plant shriveling. You might just need to water once every 10 to 14 days in a cold area.

Keep the plant itself dry at all times, especially rosette plants like Echeverias. The plant will swiftly decay and become mush as water will collect in the rosette’s center. Keep in mind that keeping a succulent moist will destroy it quickly!

Cool Temperatures are Good

The majority of succulents do not require extra warmth during the cold. It’s crucial to prevent them from freezing. The ideal temperature range is between 45 and 55 degrees Fahrenheit. The plants will remain in a semi-dormant state if kept cool. With the lower light intensity indoors during the winter, a warm environment fosters the growth of the plants, resulting in lanky plants.

No Fertilizer Needed

During the autumn and winter, succulents do not require any fertilizer. Instead of encouraging the plants to develop, you want to maintain them alive.

I’ve had great luck using these methods to overwinter plants like Echeveria, tender Sedum, Aeonium, Agave, Aloe, Crassula, Graptoveria, Kalanchoe, Faucaria, and Senecio.

The plants may endure the winter in a semi-dormant state with little stretching if you keep them sunny, dry, and cool. The succulents can be put back outside for a summer of sunbathing once the weather is no longer frosty.

How should my succulents be overwintered?

Succulents are currently among the most well-liked garden plants, particularly among younger gardeners who are trend-conscious. It makes sense that these plants are now adorning so many patios, porches, and windowsills. They require very little upkeep and can withstand drought. Additionally, several succulent kinds are a wonderful conversation starter due to their unusual appearance.

A group of plants known as succulents have large, water-retentive leaves that are thick and succulent. Jade plants, kalanchoes, hens and chicks, and even aloe vera plants are examples of vintage varieties that you may already be familiar with. However, there are now a large variety of plant forms, leaf hues, and growth behaviors among the hundreds of distinct succulent plants that can be found at your neighborhood garden center.

Succulents of the Agave, Crassula, Dudleya, Echeveria, Sedum, Haworthia, and Sempervivum species varieties are some of the most well-liked varieties.

It’s time to consider how to overwinter any succulents you may have grown this year in patio pots or your garden. The plants can be left outside all winter long if the kinds you chose are completely winter hardy in Western Pennsylvania. This group includes hardy chickens and chicks.

However, the vast majority of succulent plants offered for sale these days in garden centers are not hardy in our gardening region. Combining that with the cost of these plants, you’ll probably want to figure out a way to overwinter them so you can use them in your garden the following year as well. Succulent plants can be overwintered in three different methods.

1. Use indoor succulent plants for the winter. On an indoor sunny windowsill, the majority of succulents thrive. The key to successfully overwintering succulents as indoor plants is to drastically reduce their watering requirements. If kept excessively damp, many succulents will actually rot, therefore water succulents used as houseplants throughout the winter just once every six to eight weeks. As you water, take care to keep the leaves dry. Additionally, you should keep the plants in a room that is not overly hot or chilly. Avoid forced air registers and cold drafts.

2. Semi-dormant succulents overwinter. Succulents don’t go into full dormancy, but it is possible to drive them into a semi-dormancy by severely limiting their access to water, drastically reducing their exposure to light, and maintaining them in an environment where the temperature is just above freezing. I raise about 50 succulents and cacti outdoors in my garden throughout the summer and overwinter them in this way.

I relocate my succulent pots into our linked, but unheated garage when the low 50s are reached at night. The garage has two modest windows. The pots are arranged along the garage’s sidewalls, and I neglect them the entire winter. I don’t fertilize or water the plants. They enter a semi-dormant phase where no active growth takes place.

I move the pots outside on warm days in mid- to late-March and lightly water them, taking care to keep the foliage dry. When the threat of frost has gone in mid-May, I move the pots back into the garage once they have drained and put them back up on my patio.

3. Use cuttings to overwinter succulents. Taking cuttings of your succulent plants is another approach to ensure that they survive the winter without harm. The majority of succulents are simple to grow from leaf cuttings. Fill several tidy plastic pots with a coarse, cacti-specific potting soil to accomplish this. With a sharp knife, remove a single leaf off the mother plant. Dip the cut end of the leaf into rooting hormone (which is sold at nearby garden centers or online), and then press the cut end of the leaf down into the pot of soil by about a half-inch. The pot or leaf cutting should not be covered, but it should be watered in at planting time and any other time the soil feels fully dry.

At the base of the clipped leaf, a new plantlet will emerge in a matter of weeks. Eventually, the old leaf will wither away, leaving only the new plant. If you want to grow your succulent collection over the winter, take lots of cuttings. Keep your succulent cuttings out of direct sunlight, but on a sunny windowsill. Another choice is to place them 18 to 20 hours per day in grow lamps. As long as you don’t overwater succulents, taking leaf cuttings from them is quite easy.

In the winter, should I cover my succulents?

If you have a variety of succulents that can survive the winter outside, you might wish to do so. Your plump outdoor greens still require adequate care, though, otherwise the frost risked damaging them.

Not to mention that your plant’s roots could decay due to the winter’s damp soil. Additionally, if your region gets too much rain during the cold season, the succulents’ cells will swell. Additionally, the plant cell walls may rupture as a result of the frost. As a result, it is crucial to take precautions to safeguard your plant from all of these harmful situations.

Although some varieties of succulents can withstand below-freezing conditions, none of the species prefers frequent watering or excessive humidity throughout the year. Succulents prefer healthy soil that drains well, good airflow, and bright sunlight. Here are some precautions you should take to ensure your in-ground plants are taken care of over the winter.

Build a Greenhouse

The majority of succulents cannot withstand temperatures below 25 F during the winter nights. Bring your succulents into a DIY greenhouse if your area has the same winter temperatures, or if you have a gazebo, cover it with 5mm plastic and move your succulents there. Make sure to securely anchor the plastic, and tape the seams. You can even include a little heater if the temperature falls any lower.

Cover Your Succulents

Cover your outside succulent plants with bed sheets if your region occasionally suffers frost. Row covers and nonwoven fabrics, which are often constructed of spun nylon, are further options. Your plants will be protected when it is 2-4 degrees below freezing if you cover them with such blankets.

Additionally, don’t remove the dried leaves from your plants because they protect them from high temperatures. Move your plants that are sensitive to cold under a tree, deck, or eaves; this will prevent heat from escaping.

Succulents do they regrow after the winter?

Succulents can be divided into three groups: winter-growing, partially dormant, and entirely dormant. In the winter, most varieties go into at least partial dormancy. They don’t grow much either, but their appearance won’t change significantly either. Don’t fertilize them over the winter and give them less water more frequently.

A few varieties lose their leaves like deciduous trees and enter a deeper slumber. some (such as

The die-back of Sedum kamtschaticum and Orostachys species occurs entirely above ground. However, their root systems continue to exist and each spring produce new growth.

The cultivars that grow during the cooler months, such as those listed below, are at the other extreme of the spectrum.

Haworthia, aeonium, and aloe The start of their growing season is signaled by shorter days and cooler temperatures. With these types, the best time to fertilize is throughout the winter.

How are succulents wrapped during the winter?

Winter succulent maintenance does involve some effort. A thick horticultural fleece is one approach to shield them from the cold. In late fall or early winter, wrap your succulents in fleece to protect them from cold and extremely wet weather, which can cause the leaves to rot, especially if any of them already have damage. Horticultural fleece has an advantage over other materials in that it will let light and air flow around the succulents, keeping the plants healthy.

In the winter, how frequently should I water my succulents?

During the months that are not winter, when the temperature is above 40 degrees, you should water your succulents every other week. You should only water your succulent once a month in the winter (when the temperature falls below 40 degrees), as it goes dormant at this period.

A few situations constitute an exception to this rule. Because their tiny leaves can’t hold as much water as other varieties with larger leaves, some varieties of succulents need to be watered more frequently. In the non-winter months, feel free to give these small leaf succulents a water if they appear to be thirsty. When they are thirsty, succulents generally exhibit a wrinkled appearance. But always keep in mind that being underwater is preferable to being overwater.