How Often To Water Small Succulent Plants

During the months that are not winter, when the temperature is above 40 degrees, you should water your succulents every other week. You should only water your succulent once a month in the winter (when the temperature falls below 40 degrees), as it goes dormant at this period.

A few situations constitute an exception to this rule. Because their tiny leaves can’t hold as much water as other varieties with larger leaves, some varieties of succulents need to be watered more frequently. In the non-winter months, feel free to give these small leaf succulents a water if they appear to be thirsty. When they are thirsty, succulents generally exhibit a wrinkled appearance. But always keep in mind that being underwater is preferable to being overwater.

How should I water my tiny succulents?

Here is how to water succulents now that you are aware of the variables that influence how frequently you should water them. Yes, there are right and incorrect ways to do things. Native to the desert, succulents receive little rain in their natural settings, but when it does, it pours. Desert downpours resemble monsoons because sheets of water fall from the sky. When you water your succulent, soak it completely to simulate desert rain. Slowly pour water over it, continuing to do so until the drain hole at the bottom is completely filled. Succulents benefit more from irregular, cautious waterings that only moisten the top inch or two of the soil in the pot than they do from periodic, long, deep drinks that soak the soil to the bottom of the pot.

So when the earth around your succulent plants is completely dry, water it. Re-saturate the soil after allowing it to totally dry out. Dried up. Drench. Dried up. Drench. You can have succulents that are perfectly watered if you follow that pattern.

How are miniature succulent plants cared for?

A gardener’s joy is gathering little succulents. They are excellent for filling up the little gaps in your plant collection and have aesthetically appealing leaves with unusual shapes and a variety of hues. Succulents are the forgiving variety and will survive a brief drought even if you’re a neglectful gardener. Here are a few of our favorite kinds along with care instructions.

Haworthia

The Haworthia, also referred to as a zebra plant, is ideal for gardeners who frequently neglect to water their plants. It comes from South Africa, thus its growing season is different from what we experience in North America! While it’s dormant in the summer, reduce watering; when it’s growing in the winter, resume watering. Being a succulent plant, make sure to keep the leaves dry and wait until the soil is totally dry before watering it once more. Be confident that they will continue to be adorable for a very long time because this little boy grows extremely slowly.

Echeveria

These charming rosette-leafed succulents are guaranteed to brighten up your room with their sweetness. They are extremely low-maintenance and remain small when mature, only growing to a height of about three inches. Because they are pet-friendly, they are also fantastic for indoor gardens! Little pink and yellow blooms on stalks that protrude through the blue-green foliage in the spring can be seen.

Crassula

There are over 350 species in this large genus of succulent plants, some of which are regarded as being small! They can thrive all year long indoors and grow slowly and steadily. Because they are simple to grow and hard to destroy, crassula succulents are excellent for gardeners who don’t want to worry about plant maintenance. They can tolerate some neglect as long as they are kept at the proper temperature.

Jade

A succulent perennial with brown stems and green foliage is called dwarf jade. You may simply transform this adorable little houseplant into a bonsai tree if you want to! They thrive when spread out across a surface or in hanging baskets. Dwarf jade has an extremely sluggish rate of growth, therefore it will remain small for a very long time. In order to tolerate sporadic watering, it saves water in its trunk—in fact, it enjoys it! The only real methods to really harm this succulent are overwatering and frost.

How to Care for Mini Succulents

After learning the fundamentals of succulent care, taking care of these adorable plants is simple. Succulents are native to South Africa and favor dry, sunny environments. Use well-draining soil with rock and sand mixed in for all succulents. For the greatest growing circumstances for your plants, use soil designed specifically for succulents.

Succulents are simple to overwater, which can harm the plant and cause rot. Soak the plant, let it drain, and then wait until the soil is completely dry before watering it again to prevent overwatering. These plants are designed to resist drought, thus it’s preferable to submerge than overwater them!

Succulents require a lot of indirect light, but prolonged exposure to sunlight can burn the leaves. Keep an eye on your plant’s leaves, and if you notice any dark areas, be sure to move the plant out of the sun.

Wait until the earth is dry and has absorbed all the available water before pruning your plants. With a clean, sharp knife, remove any dead or dying stems and leaves to allow the plant to concentrate on new development rather than trying to keep dying leaves alive.

If you’re searching to buy small succulents, stop by Primex Garden Center. Our extensive selection will enhance any gardener’s collection.

If my succulent lacks water, how can I tell?

Succulents are better off dry than wet, but that doesn’t mean you can ignore the need to water them. In fact, the plant needs water to survive, and much like people, it will exhibit dehydration symptoms. Your succulent clearly needs extra water if its leaves are wrinkled and shriveled.

The cells attempt to bring in more water to make up for the water that has been lost as they release their stored moisture to the rest of the plant. The cells shrink as they run out of water and the plant is forced to rely on its limited reserves, which causes the once-firm and full leaves to collapse and shrivel.

How frequently should indoor succulents be watered?

Indoor succulent plants probably need to be watered once a week. They require ample time for the soil to dry out in between waterings so that the water may be stored in the leaves. Use the following methods and advice while watering succulent plants inside.

  • Use an irrigation system with a little pour spout.
  • Fill the succulent plant’s center with water until it is completely submerged.
  • Allow water to completely drain out of the pot through the perforations. Make careful to empty any water that seeps through the soil if there is a saucer underneath the plant.
  • Since there won’t be enough heat and fresh airflow for the leaves to dry when planted indoors, avoid soaking the leaves to prevent rot from the top down.
  • Dry the soil completely in between waterings.

Do cacti require sunlight?

Succulents generally require at least 4-6 hours of sunshine each day to thrive. They enjoy being in places that are sunny and bright. Lack of sunshine will cause difficulties in succulents such elongation or etiolation, when the plants extend for more light. Weak stems and low growth are the results of this procedure. Lack of light causes succulents to lose their bright coloring and turn pale or back to a drab green tone. Plants that receive enough sunshine will display their whole spectrum of brilliant hues, showing their genuine beauty.

Succulents—can they be kept in small pots?

Don’t you share Nell and my passion for succulents? By include them in your design, you may add some life and light to a dark spot in your house. And if you pair those succulents with the appropriate container, everyone wins. I put up this collection of 20 compact succulent pots to make your buying easier.

Succulents can thrive for a long time in these little pots because they don’t have extensive root systems. Because succulents don’t like to have their roots maintained consistently wet, it’s preferable if the pots contain a drain hole. Put at least an inch or two layers of stones on the bottom of the pot if there isn’t a drain hole, and reduce the amount and frequency of watering.

Remember that succulents are not low light plants when deciding where to place them. As much natural light as you can provide them with, the better. Check out this post on two incredibly simple techniques to propagate succulents if you already have them and want to grow more of them to plant in your new pots.

Although selecting pots is enjoyable, it may be overwhelming. These are my current favorites among the many different fashions that are available. Even if there are still many options, they are all conveniently located for easy browsing.

There may be affiliate links in this article. Our policies may be found here. Although there won’t be a price increase for you, Joy Us Garden will make a tiny commission.

A succulent can survive without water for how long?

In general, succulents that are grown indoors or outdoors during the cooler months will need less water. They can go without water for one to three months.

Indoor succulents will be less exposed to the weather outside because the soil dries out more quickly outside than it does indoors due to the wind and sunlight.

The soil remains moist for extended periods of time in milder climes, typically fall and winter.

To avoid overwatering indoor plants during the cooler months, read more about our toothpick test here.

To avoid root rot, it’s crucial to examine the soil before watering indoor succulent plants and to make sure it is completely dry between waterings.

How are succulents maintained indoors?

Succulents may not need much attention, but they do need a few essentials to survive:

  • 1. Provide plenty sunlight. Succulents require adequate light—at least six hours each day of direct sunlight. Maintaining succulents outside can be quite simple. However, if you have a succulent indoors, you must keep it in direct sunlight near a window. A plant that is slanting toward the light is not receiving enough sunlight, yet a plant with burnt areas on its leaves is receiving too much direct sunshine.
  • 2. Use proper water. Depending on the season, succulents might have different water needs. Succulents should be irrigated if their soil dries completely during the growing season, but excess water should be avoided. When a succulent’s roots have time to dry out in between waterings, its lifespan is increased. In the chilly winter months, succulent plants go dormant and require less water. Only water your succulent as often as necessary because overwatering the soil is one of the main reasons of most development problems.
  • 3. Use the proper soil and pot combination. The appropriate container and potting soil can make all the difference, whether you’re growing your own succulents or purchasing one from a nursery. Your succulent planter needs to include a drainage hole if it is going to be an outdoor succulent. Proper drainage allows moisture to escape, allowing the soil and root systems to dry and prevent rot. Use well-draining soil instead of standard dirt if you have an indoor succulent. It is coarser than regular soil, enabling more air to pass through and encouraging evaporation rather than requiring to be drained. To increase aeration, perlite and pumice can be added to some potting mixtures.
  • 4.Remember to fertilize. The periodic fertilizing is beneficial for even low maintenance desert plants. To give your succulents a boost, use a diluted, water-soluble all-purpose fertilizer a couple times a year. Although it’s not entirely required, if you notice that your soil needs some help, add a little fertilizer.
  • 5. Examine your plant life. Pest hazards are more likely to affect a succulent indoors than outside. Make sure your plants are periodically checked for gnats or mealy pests. These insects are a sign that your plants are receiving too much water or fertilizer. Mealy bugs can lay hundreds of eggs and consume the plant juices that serve as their host, gradually harming your plant. Rubbish alcohol can be sprayed on your succulent’s leaves or soil to effectively kill mealy bugs and their eggs. Check the leaves and soil of the succulent before bringing it home from the nursery to make sure no bugs are present.

Can succulents bounce back after being overwatered?

The more quickly you act, the more likely you are to be able to save your plant. The likelihood that a plant may succumb to rot increases with the amount of overwatering. As you can see from the examples above, there are times when a plant is simply too damaged to be saved.

The plant is essentially drowning from too much water and needs to dry out as quickly as possible if it is exhibiting early signs of overwatering, such as mushy, soft, and pale bottom leaves.

Steps on How To Save an Overwatered Succulent:

  • It is best to remove the plant from wherever it is and remove all the wet soil from the roots.
  • For at least three days and up to a week, let the plant to completely dry out.
  • The plant should be placed somewhere dry and sunny, but out of direct sunlight to prevent burning of the leaves and roots.
  • Replant in an appropriate, fast-draining potting mix once it has dried up; do not water right away. Before watering again, wait about a week and take care not to overwater.

You might get away with leaving the plant alone and not repotting it if you believe it is already in the proper potting mix but you were just excessively watering your plants.

Prior to watering again, wait at least a week and feel the top inch of the soil for moisture. You can water it once more if it feels dry. Your plant needs a new pot if the soil is still moist because the soil it is now in is not drying out quickly enough.

Will The Leaves Grow Back?

Yes. As long as the plant is not decaying, even if you lose a lot of leaves due to overwatering, it will eventually recover. You may soon see fresh growth or tiny leaves along the stems if you allow it time to dry out.

Additionally, you’ll see new growth coming from the plant’s sides, top, or even bottom. When you start to see new growth, your plant is typically out of danger and has fully healed.

Steps on How to Save a Rotting Succulent From Overwatering:

  • Check the plant to see how bad the rot is. You may be able to salvage some of the plant if the rot is not too bad.
  • Keep any leaf that seems to be reusable. As many leaves as you can preserve for propagation. Leaf propagation can be challenging, so you’ll need as much leaf as you can obtain to give some of them a fighting chance. Ensure you collect the leaf in its entirety, including the base. A broken leaf won’t survive.
  • Allow the leaves to dry for a few days by placing them somewhere dry and out of the sun.
  • When the leaves are completely dry, either lay them flat on the soil or bury the ends in well-draining potting mix. You can dip the leaves in rooting hormone as an optional step. I tend to skip over this step, but other people prefer to add rooting hormones to boost success rates and expedite the propagation process.
  • Avoid direct sunshine and water the soil every few days or if it seems dry. Await the development of new plants and their roots.

Other than leaves, you can also save parts of the stem

  • Examine the stem, including the roots, and remove any rotten spots. Save any stem pieces that are still green or healthy. When you cut the stem, you will be able to tell if it is viable or not. If the stem’s inside reveals green, fragile sections that aren’t brown or black, they may have a chance of surviving and can be multiplied to start a new plant.
  • Saved stems should be stored in a dry, shaded area. All cuts should calluses and seal after a few days to a week of drying. Dip the stems in rooting hormone, if desired. I tend to skip over this step, but other people prefer to add rooting hormones to boost success rates and expedite the propagation process.
  • When the stems are dry, make a well-draining potting mix and place them in it.
  • Every couple of days or whenever the soil gets dry, mist. Keep away from direct sunlight until fully rooted to avoid sun damage.

You can see that the stem still has a lot of green, healthy sections after removing the decaying portion, indicating that it can be preserved. I placed this stem in soil to root and grow after letting it dry out for a few days.

Overwatered echeveria that has withered. I kept a few of the leaves for future growth.