How Much Water Do Outdoor Succulents Need

During the spring and summer, when succulents are actively growing, you’ll need to water them much more frequently. They rapidly extract water from the earth as they grow new stems, leaves, roots, and blossoms. Depending on the weather, such as the light and temperature, you might water them three times every week. Succulent plants go dormant in the winter. You won’t need to water them very much throughout the season because their growth has stopped. Giving a succulent too much water in the winter is one of the simplest ways to destroy it, so avoid using your watering can from November to March. Allow your succulent to rest peacefully in the desert.

Container Size

Because larger containers contain more soil, which retains moisture longer, they require less frequent watering. Small, shallow containers will require more regular watering because the soil dries out more quickly.

Do outdoor succulents need to be watered?

Various pots are ideal for succulent growth. If the water level is carefully controlled, those who live entirely indoors can occupy nearly any form of receptacle, from teapots to terrariums. But in the open air, strong rains can soak succulents. Use of containers with drainage holes is essential because to this. The best containers are made of terra cotta because they naturally wick moisture from the soil. In order to ensure the best drainage, succulents should be potted in a light succulent soil mixture.

Succulents in pots that are kept outside won’t require nearly as much watering as those planted in the ground. However, check in with your plants if the weather is extremely hot or dry. The leaves seem shriveled. Does the ground seem to be dusty? If so, a drink is probably in order. While it’s true that most succulents benefit from lots of sunshine, others thrive in shadow or partial exposure. Make sure the succulents in your planter need a similar amount of light, then place them where they will thrive in your yard.

How should outdoor succulents be cared for?

Although succulent plants can endure dry spells, they need constant watering during the growing season. Water deeply once the soil has dried to about two inches (5 cm) below the surface, then wait a few days before watering again.

Rot is the most frequent issue with succulents. This can be avoided by keeping the stems out of the soil and allowing drying times in between irrigations. Additionally, irrigate the plant from the base to keep the leaves dry.

Keep an eye out for bug problems and use water and horticultural soap spray to eliminate them.

During the maintenance of succulent garden plants, cut off dead stems and offsets. It is simple to start an offset as a brand-new plant. Offsets should be planted in a fresh part of the garden after being cared for in a well-drained potting mix until the roots are substantial and strong.

How long can succulent plants be left outside without water?

In general, succulents that are grown indoors or outdoors during the cooler months will need less water. They can go without water for one to three months.

Indoor succulents will be less exposed to the weather outside because the soil dries out more quickly outside than it does indoors due to the wind and sunlight.

The soil remains moist for extended periods of time in milder climes, typically fall and winter.

To avoid overwatering indoor plants during the cooler months, read more about our toothpick test here.

To avoid root rot, it’s crucial to examine the soil before watering indoor succulent plants and to make sure it is completely dry between waterings.

Do succulents need to be in the sun directly?

1. Ensure that your succulents receive adequate light. Depending on the type, succulents need six hours of sunlight each day because they are light-loving plants. You might need to gradually expose newly planted succulents to full sun exposure or give shade with a translucent screen because they can burn in direct sunshine.

Can succulents survive in the direct sun outside?

Succulents are drought-tolerant plants because they can retain water in their large, irregularly shaped leaves. Succulents have a broad variety of eye-catching shapes and textures, which provide any landscape aesthetic interest. Can succulents live outside? is an often asked question. The quick response is “yes”! Growing succulents outdoors is an excellent alternative because they do well there and can withstand some neglect. They also do well in sunny areas with warm, dry weather.

Succulents can be grown in the ground, in pots, or hidden in unexpected planting locations. Take the uncertainty out of caring for these wonderful conversation pieces with stunning foliage by reading our suggestions for growing succulents outside.

Do:

  • Water flowing downward till it exits the pot’s drainage hole from above: Succulents respond well to this kind of watering, which is the norm for most houseplants. Run a moderate, constant trickle of room-temperature water over the top layer of the soil in your succulent plant using a watering can or cup that has been filled. Your indication to quit is when water begins to flow from the pot’s drainage hole. Give the plant 15 minutes to absorb the last of the moisture. After that, empty any remaining liquid from the tray into the sink.
  • If your succulent’s soil is tightly packed and not appearing to be uniformly absorbing your top watering, you can try the bottom-watering method. The horticulture and owner of the Planthood store in Amsterdam, Monai Nailah McCullough, says that watering succulents from the top can occasionally cause damage to the roots. Watering it from the bottom allows it to slowly and effectively consume enough water. Put your succulent(s) in a shallow dish, plastic container, or tray that is 2 to 3 inches deep with water to bottom water them. Allow them to soak in the water for five to fifteen minutes, or until the top of the soil feels just damp to the touch. Refill as necessary.

We have no control over the accessibility features of the third-party content used to display this advertisement.

Don’t:

  • Mist its leaves: Succulents are not among the plant species that benefit from a good misting, although some do. Mirroring a plant’s natural surroundings is essential to ensuring its happiness in captivity. Additionally, because they are native to dry regions with low humidity, succulents are unaccustomed to having wet leaves. Thompson notes that “the water can get trapped and develop fungal concerns.” There is basically no point since they aren’t used to being sprayed.
  • Put it in a container with no drainage opening: Drainage holes act as a pathway for water that your plant is unable to absorb. Succulents definitely need it because they are so sensitive to overwatering.
  • Use ice cubes: Some plant owners use ice cubes to give their plants a more gentle and controlled soak because they disseminate a tiny amount of water very slowly. Again, though, if the goal is to simulate the succulent’s natural desert habitat, giving them something very cold makes little sense and might even startle them.
  • Water it less frequently, but more often: You should give your succulent a deep soak rather than a light misting every few days.

Do succulents in the garden need to be fed?

When the dirt in the top inch of the container has dried fully, fertilizers should be applied. If the soil is still wet, postpone a weekly application so that the soil can dry.

Tip

If the soil in the pot is drying out quickly and requires more regular watering, you can substitute the quarter-strength fertilizer for the majority of succulents. Before the plant can access the nutrients, frequent irrigation flushes them from the pot.

Because plants can reach the nitrogen store in the soil, outdoor succulents typically don’t need fertilizer. Apply half the suggested amount of a balanced slow-release fertilizer in the spring if they do require feeding.

Which is best for succulents, inside or out?

Succulents, however, are hardy plants that may thrive in a variety of conditions, including neglect, little access to water, fast-draining soil, and a steady source of sunshine.

It’s excellent if you live somewhere where the weather is just right for them to thrive outside.

But if you don’t, you’ll need to make some alterations and adjustments.

These bizarre plants have evolved to survive in the worst conditions, including the wettest climates, little to no soil, and the steepest slopes.

A variety of surprises, including vibrant edges, tips, or complete shifts in foliage color, can be found in the sunlight or the chilly outdoors.

When succulents are grown outside, the weather will determine and set off when the plants are dormant or active, depending on the species. On the other hand, when it warms up, that can cause new births, color changes, or blooming.

Aloe vera should be hydrated either from the top or bottom.

I make money from qualifying purchases as an Amazon Associate. I appreciate you using the links, so.

Aloe vera plant owners frequently hear that they are difficult to care for, but that isn’t actually the case.

The good thing is that an aloe vera requires very little watering, so you won’t have much to do when it comes to keeping it well maintained. Just like any other plant, you simply need to know what to do to keep it healthy.

Having said that, it’s crucial for you to discover how to water it, namely whether to water aloe vera plants from the top or bottom.

Aloe vera plants should constantly be watered from the bottom up. Aloe vera plants don’t require much watering, but when they do, it’s important to do it correctly. In order to achieve this, steadily pour water into the pot until drainage holes beneath the pot begin to fill with water.

You water aloe vera from the bottom because you want the roots to be nicely damp but not drenched when you’re done.

You will achieve your goal of finishing the roots first if you concentrate on directing the water close to the bottom of the pot.

How frequently do succulents need to be watered?

During the months that are not winter, when the temperature is above 40 degrees, you should water your succulents every other week. You should only water your succulent once a month in the winter (when the temperature falls below 40 degrees), as it goes dormant at this period.

A few situations constitute an exception to this rule. Because their tiny leaves can’t hold as much water as other varieties with larger leaves, some varieties of succulents need to be watered more frequently. In the non-winter months, feel free to give these small leaf succulents a water if they appear to be thirsty. When they are thirsty, succulents generally exhibit a wrinkled appearance. But always keep in mind that being underwater is preferable to being overwater.

Do you regularly water succulents?

Only water succulents when the soil has totally dried up. There isn’t a standard watering schedule that applies to all succulents in all environments.

Many indoor succulent growers discover that watering their plants every 14 to 21 days keeps them healthy. Use this timeline as a guide and make adjustments if necessary.

The earliest symptoms of underwatering on the leaves are the greatest time to water your succulents. To see what that looks like, have a look at the cheat sheet above.

The best course of action is to wait for a signal from your succulent before watering because most succulents are particularly susceptible to rot with regular watering.

And keep in mind how crucial it is to monitor your watering routine. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve assumed that I haven’t watered in a while, just to discover that it was only a few days ago thanks to my notes in the Succulent Tracker app (Apple | Android).

In this video, learn about a several factors that could influence how frequently you water your succulents:

What does a succulent that has been underwater look like?

The appearance of the leaves is the best indicator of whether your succulent is being overwatered or overwatered. While an overwatered plant will have mushy, nearly translucent leaves, an underwatered plant will have wrinkly, shriveled up foliage.

These are the plainly visible warning signals that your succulent is being overwatered or underwatered. However, the signs are frequently difficult to read. A succulent that has been submerged in water may act similarly to a plant that has been overwatered.

And here is the part where most folks are perplexed. Other indicators can help you determine whether you are indeed overwatering or underwatering your plants.