How Long Does It Take For Succulents To Grow Big

The growth pace of your succulents will depend on where you plan to plant them and the varieties you choose.

For instance, the fastest-growing succulents, like Echeveria, can expand from a 2 inch plant to 6 to 8 inches in just a year, whilst the slowest-growing succulents, like Haworthias, might take up to a year or even longer. to increase in size from 2 to 5 inches.

I mentioned before that I couldn’t generalize about all succulents. It is already known that all succulents require time to mature. However, when considering succulents as a whole, some do develop more quickly than others.

Other factors that might have a big impact on the growth of the succulents include watering, sunlight or lack thereof, the soil they are planted in, and the season.

These plants go through stages throughout the year where they are either actively developing or dormant.

How can I speed up the growth of my succulents?

Succulents frequently push their roots together in circles to maximize the amount of soil they can absorb. How much room you gave the succulent in a container or in a garden determines how small the root circle is. You can occasionally assist the succulent in spreading its roots if you want it to develop more quickly. The plant will be able to take more nutrients from the soil as a result, leading to quicker development. Succulents have a tendency to occupy empty spaces, both in the soil and above it.

The method is really easy to follow. Just gently remove the succulent from the ground. Avoid damaging the root system at any costs. To loosen the dirt if the succulent is in the pot, gently squeeze the pot or pour a few drops of water around the rib. Shake the earth from the roots gently once the succulent has been removed. The ideal method is to use your fingers to gently massage the root system. You can plant the succulent in new soil after removing the old soil. Make sure to distribute the roots with your hands as widely as you can when you do that. Avoid using anything sharp that could hurt or harm them.

Do succulents swell up and expand?

Some succulent species grow more quickly than others, giving them the appearance of being larger than other succulents.

One of the fastest-growing succulents, the Kalanchoe, can grow exponentially large in comparison to other succulents. Within a few weeks, they can develop from cuttings into fully rooted plants.

The Kalanchoe is sometimes regarded as invasive due to the way it spreads. With very little to no work on your side, they can quickly produce additional plants (or pups). In just a few months, a single two-inch Kalanchoe plant can yield dozens of pups and become very large.

The methods a succulent can expand are numerous. Some succulents, like the Haworthia, grow large by making pups, or replicas of themselves. If given ample room, they will continue to spread.

Some succulents develop on their own into enormous plants. One succulent that appears quite small when purchased but can grow into a significantly large plant is the jade plant, or Crassula ovata.

Another large-growing succulent that is better suited to being planted outdoors as a landscape plant is the agave.

Are succulents able to grow quickly?

The growth rates of various succulent species vary. Climate, soil type, irrigation, and fertilizing all affect how big and fast a plant grows. While fast-growing ground cover species like Sedum can spread up to 1″ each month during the growing season, slow varieties will stay neat and compact in a pot.

Do tiny succulents get larger?

The majority of small succulents are young plants or cuttings that haven’t grown to maturity.

They can also be wired or glued to the chosen arrangement, be it a wood planter, a wall art piece, a wreath arrangement, etc.

Do Mini Succulents Grow?

Yes. Mini succulents grow, although they don’t do so quickly at first. Do anticipate that after they reach a certain size, they will grow more quickly until they eventually outgrow their pots. I’ll use this echeveria and haworthia (zebra plant) as an example to demonstrate the development of their growth in this tiny pot.

They were simultaneously planted in this tiny container by me. These are all young plants. The haworthias were offspring of the mother plant, but the echeveria was multiplied from a single leaf. Here is how they developed throughout the previous year:

They became sunburnt quite soon, and I lost the one on the far left. In order to keep it from drying out, I moved it to a more shaded area and watered it more frequently—roughly once a week.

How Fast Do Mini Succulents Grow?

Their growth is slowed down when placed in a compact container since they are unable to stretch out and thrive. Depending on how well they are taken care of, micro succulents planted closely and compactly in a small area or pot can remain there for several months or even years. The type of soil they are in, hydration methods, and illumination all have a significant impact on how they develop.

The kind of plant you are utilizing also matters. Growing plants from cuttings, tiny plants, or leaves generally takes longer than growing established plants. Some succulents, regardless of where they are put, have a propensity to grow huge.

Aeoniums are one illustration of this. Aeoniums tend to grow upward and their rosettes spread outward, making them a poor choice for small arrangements. The haworthias and echeverias I displayed above are excellent options because they don’t grow as quickly or take up a lot of space. Sedums are another excellent option because they are resilient and adaptable to many growth environments.

When kept in a small space, they also continue to be little. Water your plants as little as possible—just spritz or spray them to keep them from drying out—if you want them to stay little. The plants’ growth ought to be slowed by this.

Succulents are incredibly resilient plants that can endure harsh environments for a very long period. Remember that many of the miniature succulent plants used in these arrangements are cuttings or baby plants, which are less hardy than mature plants. As a result, be ready to lose one or two of them during the process.

How Long Can Mini Succulents Stay in Small Pots?

Mini succulents can live for a few weeks, a few months, or even years in tiny pots. It all relies on the kind of plants you’re utilizing and how well you’re taking care of them. They will eventually start to outgrow the small container as they develop more.

If you maintain the plant in the same pot and don’t move it, you may start to notice that it appears unhappy or that it is spilling out of the pot. If the pot has holes, you might even see roots emerging from the holes. These are all indications that they require repotting because they have outgrown the pot.

Just remove it from the pot and repotted it in a bigger container. Trim the plant to keep it small and remove little portions to propagate and grow the plant elsewhere if you don’t feel like repotting the entire thing. Your aesthetic preferences for the plant are entirely up to you.

You can carefully remove the plant and replant it in soil if the plants aren’t in soil but you start to see roots forming.

How Big Do They Get?

While development may be stifled when kept in a small pot, the plant should be able to continue developing and eventually reach its full growth potential once it is replanted somewhere else and given enough opportunity to grow. It will be more difficult for the plant to grow to its full potential if it is kept in the same container, though. You must inevitably repot the plant into a larger container if you want to see it flourish.

Once the other plants have outgrown it, the fun thing is that you can choose new miniature succulents to put in your miniature garden.

How to Plant Your Own Mini Succulent Garden

Mine tend to persist longer when they are planted in soil, therefore I like to do that. Because they are initially quite slow growers and will remain little for a very long time, I also appreciate using very small plants developed from cuttings, frequently leaf cuttings. I gently plant them with cactus soil mix mixed with perlite for additional drainage once they are well-rooted and established.

Additionally, I enjoy using planters with drainage holes. Given their small size, it is important to keep these plants out of the full sun to avoid sun damage and sunburn.

If you are unable to plant them in soil, you can secure the plants using wire or adhesive and coir or sphagnum moss. The plant shouldn’t be harmed by the glue.

To give these two plants more room to grow and spread out, I divided them and placed each in an own pot.

They could have continued to develop in the same pot for a few more months or maybe a year, but I put them in separate pots to hasten the process.

How Long Do Mini Succulents Live?

It depends on their surroundings and the kind of care they receive. Generally speaking, plants survive longer when planted in soil as opposed to being adhered to or set in sphagnum moss or coir materials. Their roots will have something to grip onto and secure themselves after they are put in soil.

The ability of a plant to absorb water from the soil is improved when the plant becomes rooted in comparison to when the roots are loose, fastened, or linked to something. The soil they are placed in provides them with some nutrition as well. They can survive for many months or even years in the same pot or container with the right care.

How to Care for Mini Succulents and Keep Them Alive

A tiny succulent garden requires sufficient sunlight, the ideal soil type, and appropriate watering procedures.

Because of their diminutive size, the containers carry less water and dry out more quickly. Additionally, because the plants I’m using are young and were produced from cuttings, they could need a little more water than mature plants. When watering, I prefer to use a squirt bottle or a spray bottle and direct the water toward the earth rather than the plant’s top.

To prevent rotting, you want the water to reach the plant’s roots rather than its body or leaves. I water once a week on average. Remember that I have my plants outside and that I live in an extremely dry area.

You might not need to water as frequently if you reside in a humid environment. Before watering, it is advisable to examine the soil for moisture, especially if unsure. To see if moisture meters are useful, you can investigate them. Moisture meters gauge the air’s and soil’s humidity levels.

Succulents prefer a potting mixture with good drainage. They dislike spending too much time on soggy ground. This might encourage root rot. In addition to using effective watering methods, the type of soil you employ is crucial.

Select a soil that drains well, or amend the soil to improve drainage. I find that using a regular cactus potting mix and adding perlite for better drainage is a simple solution. Please click on Best Soil and Fertilizers For Succulents to read more about the best soil to use for succulents.

With the exception of some sedums, little succulents cannot stand severe heat or direct sunlight. Since many miniature succulents are the result of cuttings, they require some shade from the sun. Avoid direct sunlight, especially the harsh afternoon sun, but make sure there is plenty of bright light.

Sunlight in the morning is less strong and more tolerable. As a general guideline, give the plants 5 to 6 hours of sunlight each day or artificial light to see the best results.

Fertilizing is not really important for succulents because they don’t actually eat much, especially if you want to keep the plants small. I would only think about fertilizing small succulents if they were in a vase without soil and you had them for a while. To provide the plants with nutrients that they would not otherwise receive from the soil or potting mix, you can think about fertilizing them.

This can be accomplished by incorporating diluted fertilizer—about 1/4–1/2 strength—into the water you’ll use to spritz or water the plants. By doing this, you are giving the plants the nutrients they require to flourish. Again, unless you’ve had them for a while—roughly a year—this is really not essential.

Over the years, I’ve kept a lot of little succulents in tiny pots all over my home, and they have done extremely nicely.

They really don’t differ much from other succulent plants in terms of care and maintenance. They will be OK if you give them some tender loving care but, for the most part, leave them alone. That, at least, has served me well. Congratulations and happy gardening!

What stores sell miniature succulents? For suggestions on where to get these and succulent cuttings online, visit my resource page.

About

You’ve come to the correct location if, like me, you enjoy succulents. This website is a repository for the succulent-growing knowledge I’ve accumulated over the years and am still learning. Although I am by no means an expert on succulents and cacti, this website was created as a result of years of hard work, love, and many mistakes and learning opportunities.

How do I get my succulents to get fat?

The current gardening trend of succulents won’t go away anytime soon. Geometric shapes, beautiful, frequently elaborate patterns, and details are adored by enthusiasts. Succulents can grow and flourish in a variety of temperatures, so they are no longer solely thought of as desert or indoor plants. They are a wise drought-tolerant option to thirsty lawns and other water-guzzling plants in drought-affected areas.

Succulents can look so wonderful with little work. But they still need to be attended to.

Do Not Overwater

You adore your succulents and want to give them water every other day so they will grow lush and pliant. But what you’ll actually get is a mushy, shriveled mess. Succulents are more susceptible to overwatering than underwatering. The roots may decay. Look for good tissue, remove some cuttings, let the cut end develop a callus, then replant it if it’s too late. Remove the oversaturated succulent from the soil.

Do not Neglect

Succulents are plants that grow in the desert and don’t require any watering at all, am I right? Wrong. Although they don’t require much watering, they nonetheless require it to survive. If you reside in an area that receives little rain, water succulents frequently while they are actively growing. This would be from spring until autumn.

Group Plants with Similar Water Needs

Succulents shouldn’t be placed next to finicky perennials that need fertile soil and regular watering. In your garden, you should ideally have areas that can withstand drought and require little water, medium water, and so on. Your life will be made simpler, and your plants will be more content.

The Right Soil

At nurseries and home improvement retailers, succulent soil mixtures are sold by the bag. Succulents grown in a garden may not always be feasible or required, despite the fact that it is helpful for container plants, particularly those used as indoor plants. Find out more about the soil type in your yard and add additives to make it more quickly draining and dryer.

It is vital to provide succulents with the finest growing circumstances for strong roots and attractive plants, even if some are extremely tolerant and will grow virtually everywhere, including in clay.

5. Shine a Light

For optimum growth, the majority of succulents require both sunlight and shade. A beautiful, content plant will not emerge from either extreme. Determine the optimal location in your garden by learning about the specific lighting needs of your succulents.

Protect from Frost

The majority of succulents grow throughout the winter, when they do not require watering. Watering plants during the dormant season increases the risk of their roots rotting and ultimately killing them. They prefer a dry, cool environment.

Move your potted succulents beneath eaves to avoid oversaturation if your location is receiving a lot of rain, or bring them inside, if your succulents are outside.

Frost is a different story. Watch out for freeze warnings. Succulents are protected during the winter and summer by covering with a cloth or growing under a tree.

Put Succulents in the Ground

Some people believe that while succulents are planted outdoors, they must be contained because they are considered houseplants. Succulents, like any other plant, love to be planted in garden beds where they may be productive and multiply, even though they look fantastic in a well-designed container arrangement. Succulents will thrive growing in the ground or raised beds in warmer climates without freezing temperatures in the winter.

Some plants can grow practically everywhere there is at least some dirt for their roots to adhere to because they are so tolerant of many soil types.

Allow to Callus Before Transplanting

One of the simplest plants to propagate is the succulent. Simply cut off a piece, some leaves, a stem, an offset, or a “baby,” and plant it in the ground or another container. But before you do, give the stem a few days to calluse over in order to stop decay. Cuttings can either be placed on a paper towel and left for up to 5 days, or they can be placed in a container or another location where you’ll remember to replant them.

Get Rid of Harmful Insects

Your succulent is not looking good, that much is certain. Unable to open buds, deformed growth, cotton-like attachments to roots, tiny insects on new growth, dots on leaves resembling paprika, brown bumps on stems, collapsed outer leaves, and holes in leaves are all symptoms.

The offender? Insects. Some gardeners mistakenly believe that hardy succulents are insect-resistant. To determine the symptom, pest, and remedy, consult a master gardener website online or purchase one of the books about succulents.

Protect from Disease

An orange-colored, cancerous-looking growth close to or on the stem of a succulent is one indication of illness. It most likely has a minute mite infection. The succulent should be placed in a different container until fresh, healthy growth occurs after the contaminated tissue has been removed. To stop the infection from spreading to other plants, remember to clean your instruments after using them on affected succulents.