Do Succulents Need Pebbles

Sempervivum, Jovibaraba, and Sedum are winter-hardy plants that can grow in zones 3–9.

Light:

The majority of succulent species require from half a day to a full day of direct sunlight. It is advised to find some afternoon shade in particularly hot places. Succulents planted in excessive shadow will extend outward in search of more sunlight. Enough sunlight will help succulents grow into gorgeous, vibrant plants.

Planting:

Plants should be gently removed from their containers and planted, making that the soil level is maintained at the same depth as it was in the container.

Keep in mind that most of our plants came straight from the cold frames where they were shielded from the harsh sun and drying winds. For the first week, give your plants and garden décor some shade and cover to gradually adapt them. Every few days, extend the length of the day by a few hours. This will make it possible for a smooth transition.

A layer of pebbles or pea gravel sprinkled on the soil surrounding the plant will be beneficial to your succulents. Additionally, it is highly ornamental.

Soil:

Succulents require soil with good drainage. Make sure the place has good drainage and is not in a low region that would remain wet before planting in the garden. You can buy cactus soil for container gardening or add sand, gravel, or volcanic rock to your potting soil for enhanced drainage. You should have a drainage hole in the container you are using for planting, or you can fill the bottom of the container with crushed rock before adding the planting medium. Spreading gravel or tiny pebbles on top of the ground can add a lot of style.

Watering:

After planting, water the area thoroughly and wait a short while before watering again. Wet feet bother succulents, who don’t like them. Water whatever you do thoroughly. They will require less water once they are established.

Fertilizer:

Succulents generally require relatively little fertilizer. During the growing season, they only require monthly watering and a balanced fertilizer.

Flowering:

Each type of sedum blooms at a different period and in a variety of pink, red, and yellow hues.

After the second or third year, Sempervivums will flower. From the middle of the main rosette, which has a cluster of flowers, a flower stalk will emerge. Sempervivum blooms are open, starry, and typically pink. They are carried above the plant on a stem with several blossoms. Fortunately, there are always chicks born earlier from the base that grow in a ring around the mother plant to continue for subsequent years. The monocarpic crown that generates the flower head dies off after flowering. Twist the stalk off gently once the blossom fades, then plant a chick where it was.

Winter maintenance:

Typically, established succulents in the garden do not require winter protection. Snow frequently provides protection for chilly locations. Balsam boughs can be used as a light winter mulch in cold climates without snow cover, but this is typically not necessary.

Shipping:

When your plants are delivered, gently open the package as soon as possible. Once you have unpacked your things, water your plants properly and let them drain well because we ship plants on the dry side. Early-spring shipping succulents could have some dry edges and a lackluster appearance. This is typical, and their color will deepen when exposed to sunlight. Sempervivums change color with the seasons, and each variety has a certain time of year when it is at its most vibrant.

Uses:

Succulents can be used in countless planting scenarios. The most interesting containers and troughs are those with a variety of colors, textures, and behaviors. Succulents make lovely plants for rock gardens. There is always color since there are so many different bloom times.

Do succulents require pebbles or soil?

Although succulents can’t grow in rocks by themselves, there are a number of ways to make it appear as though they are.

The procedure is straightforward when planting in a typical pot. Plant the succulent in your container, then cover the dirt with a substantial layer of rock. Fill the container with succulent potting mix. This obscures the top soil layer, giving the impression that the plant is growing in rock.

This is also possible if you are planting them in a yard area that is outside. This is why certain plant varieties are ideal for landscaping that requires less water, such as xeriscapes.

Do river pebbles work well for cacti?

These are some very fundamental DOs and DON’Ts when it comes to caring for succulents to ensure their happiness.

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You can read the first chapter for free before signing up or downloading the complete book.

Top Dressings

In your succulent pots, AVOID using moss. Although it is attractive, it retains moisture and fosters fungi and germs. Additionally, stay away from non-porous rocks like glass marbles, pea gravel, river rocks, fish rocks, sand, etc. As long as the soil has enough air to breathe, you can put a few rocks here and there as ornamentation.

USE TOP DRESSINGS THAT ALSO SERVE AS DRAINS. Shale, Turface, and pumice are my top choices. The Supplies page is a list of my shopping sources.

DO NOT utilize containers without drainage holes unless you only intend to use them for a short period of time. This applies to terrariums, jars, bowls, and mugs. And no, you cannot use them if you first fill them with soil and then place pebbles on the bottom. This fosters the growth of the bacteria that causes rot.

If there isn’t a hole in the bottom, drill it. If the container is non-porous or glazed, you should make enough holes with a ceramic or glass bit to allow the soil to dry out fast. Use a piece of screen, burlap, garlic net, or anything else that will keep the dirt in yet enable it to completely drain for larger holes.

Light

If your succulents aren’t used to full sun, DON’T expose them to it. Most people prefer part-sun over bright indirect sun. A succulent can be burned and killed when moved from partial to full sun.

Give your succulents as much light as they can handle, but do it gradually. Put your plant in a spot that receives a little more sun than it usually does, then move it over the course of a week or more to a brighter spot. Shelves, gardens, and windows facing north will all receive less light than those facing west. South receives a wonderful combination of east and west sun, while east-facing receives morning sun.

DON’T base the frequency of your irrigation on a schedule, but rather on how dry the soil surrounding the roots is. You could wish to repot in a different container with better draining soil if the soil doesn’t dry out within a week.

DON’T rule out using a smaller, more quickly drying pot. The best clay is unglazed and has drainage holes. Improve your soil by adding more drainage components than organic ones.

DO NOT use pre-bagged potting soil with additional fertilizer as it frequently lacks the proper nutritional balance for succulents and contains an excessive amount of organic material that causes the soil to dry out too rapidly.

DON’T use anything but ordinary topsoil and a ton of drainage materials. Brown organic dirt should be present in the same quantity or less than the other ingredients. On the Care Guide page is my formula for soil.

DON’T assume the soil your plant was grown in is the best soil for that kind of succulent. Before bringing any plants home, make sure to check them for fungus and pests. Avoid purchasing plants that were housed with ill or infected plants, as well as those that have been treated with neonicotinoids or other insecticides that are harmful to the environment.

DO check the plants you’ve picked and the surrounding plants for insects and fungus before taking them inside. If necessary, and especially if the soil was moist when you acquired it, repot your succulents in good soil. Take care not to expose them to more sun than they are used to. Start with some light exposure and progressively increase it over the course of a week or longer.

Additionally, Mountain Crest Gardens offers stunning, healthy succulents that may be delivered right to your door swiftly.

Need rocks in the bottom for succulents?

The main goal of adding pebbles to the succulent plant’s pot is to improve drainage. Cacti and succulents grow naturally in sandy, swiftly draining soils. Never leave the roots of a succulent plant in soggy ground. To keep the roots from decaying, the rocks aid in the movement of water through the soil.

Best Rocks For Your Succulent Garden

Nationwide, a mania for succulents is spreading. Beautiful images of these plants may have started to dominate the Instagram feeds of local interior designers and gardeners. A remarkable group of plants known as succulents hold water in their stems or leaves. They provide an infinite range of eye-catching colors, shapes, and textures.

Succulents’ exceptional appeal is also due to the fact that they require very little care and irrigation. Succulents may flourish in practically any setting, and maintaining them doesn’t need much work. They are hence the ideal low-maintenance plant for the busy or forgetful gardener. You can sit back, unwind, and enjoy your low care landscaping after the initial planning and planting.

Succulents appear stunning on their own, but they look even more beautiful when they are surrounded by or combined with natural stone. Stone can visually enhance plants or act as a groundcover to protect them, especially in outdoor gardens. Succulents and rocks go together like bread and butter.

Now, we don’t just mean a rock you could find by the side of the road when we say “rocks for your succulent garden.” With a variety of sizes, shapes, and hues accessible for decorative uses, natural stone is a universe unto itself. For instance, boulders are large rocks that typically measure at least one foot in diameter. Stone that has been broken into angular bits and separated based on size makes up crushed rock. The term “rumble” describes larger bits of crushed rock. Pebbles and cobbles are round, smooth stones. These are just a few examples of the natural stone items that go well with succulents.

So, what are the best rocks for your succulent garden?

We spoke with two of our favorite (and neighborhood) gardening experts to find the answer to this issue. Here is our selection of the best rocks and natural stone items to complement your succulent garden:

Does growing a succulent require dirt?

Regular potting soil from your yard won’t work for succulents since they need soil that drains. Select cactus soil or potting soil that has been mixed with sand, pumice, or perlite. Be gentle when repotting because succulent roots are extremely brittle.

Size

Choose a pot that is just big enough for the plant to grow in, but not too big. The circumference of the appropriate pot is 5–10% greater than the size of the plant. Choose pots with a maximum excess space around the sides of an inch or two. The delicate roots will spread if the pot is too big before the plant has a chance to develop. There won’t be any room for the roots to spread in a pot that is too tiny.

Style

The ideal pot should not only complement your style and decor but also the physical properties of the plant. Tall pots look excellent with upright-growing succulents, like aloe. Low-growing cultivars, like Echeveria, look fantastic in little pots. Not to mention spillers with trailing growth tendencies like String of Pearls. Spillers in shallow pots or hanging plants look fantastic and grow well.

Material

There are many different types of materials for pots. The most prevalent materials are wood, terracotta, metal, ceramic, and resin. Terracotta or ceramic pots work best for succulent plants. Both of these materials allow for proper air and water circulation because they are both breathable. Just keep in mind that both ceramic and terracotta are weighty, especially after adding soil and plants.

Pick resin or plastic pots for larger plants, especially ones you plan to move around. Your back will thank you for using those lighter pots as you move or reposition plants.

Drainage

Before you plant and cultivate succulents, the most important thing to understand is that they don’t like a lot of water. Even before you develop a watering schedule, this is relevant. Without adequate drainage, water that accumulates at the bottom of a container without anywhere to go may cause root rot in your succulent.

The ideal pots for succulents, regardless of design, are planters with drainage holes in the bottom. Since many succulent planters lack drainage holes, you can use any of them as long as you keep in mind to water succulents sparingly and keep an eye on them frequently.