Do Succulents Need Nutrients

Concerned about fertilizer for succulents? Many individuals mistakenly believe that succulents don’t require fertilizer. However, succulents will benefit from routine fertilizer just like the majority of plants. Find out what to use and how frequently you should fertilize!

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Succulents require nourishment to grow healthily and beautifully, just like all other plants. Surprisingly, few people believe that succulents require fertilizer.

While they may obtain some of the nutrients they require from the soil, fertilizer will aid in their growth and improve the colors they produce.

What types of nutrients prefer succulents?

In this second of a two-part series, we’ll show you how to cultivate and maintain succulents with ease. We gave you the fundamentals earlier this week, and today we’re going to teach you a few extra tips that will keep your plants growing (and wow your friends)!

hydrogen peroxide in water. I’ve recently picked up a few tips, one of which is to hydrate my succulents with a solution of hydrogen peroxide and water (I use a solution of 2 parts water to 1 part Hydrogen Peroxide). Water is just hydrogen peroxide with an extra oxygen molecule looking for something to do. The peroxide will help to flush out any standing water and oxygenate the soil, both of which are beneficial to the roots. Additionally, it will aid in eliminating any potentially dangerous fungi, microorganisms, or insect eggs from the soil. I don

Feed the ground. Growing plants in soil will eventually cause its nutrients to get depleted since soil is like a living entity. You must occasionally feed your soil in order for it to maintain the health of your plants. In-ground succulents probably won’t require fertilizer, but potted succulents definitely will. Succulents prefer fertilizers with a lot of nitrogen, which is present in all fertilizers in some combination with phosphorus and potassium. I’ve had great success with Miracle-succulent Gro’s fertilizer for my succulent plants.

Apply fertilizers on your plants without hesitation, but keep in mind to use them sparingly and at low concentrations to prevent burning the plant. Succulents respond well to a variety of conventional and organic fertilizers, so choose the one that makes you the happiest.

Separate new plants from the others. You have no idea how a plant was cared for earlier in its life when you buy it. Even while it could appear to be in good shape, there could be rotting or insect-filled parts that you can’t see.

Mealybugs or aphids are typical issues that any new plant may experience. Overwatering can also result in dead roots in plants. Keeping your new succulents apart will safeguard all of your plants and enable you to quickly address any issues that may develop.

If you do notice any bugs on your new plants, you may take care of them right away and the issue won’t be significant. I use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to dab on any injured leaves and where I observe plants to get rid of mealy bugs. You might try cleaning the plant with hot water or using an organic insecticidal soap to get rid of aphids and mites. A contact pesticide can be necessary for trickier infestations.

Never hesitate to prune or trim your succulents. Is your plant becoming overly lanky as a result of inadequate sunlight? Cut it! Don’t be scared to start afresh by chopping a few inches off the stem’s bottom. Don’t be intimidated; simply follow our growing cut succulents tutorial, which will walk you through the process. Additionally, you can remove any lone leaves and use them to start a new plant.

When do my succulents need to be fed?

Most of the time, feeding succulents and cacti should only be done once a year, according to some experts. I’m sorry, but I’ve breached that rule.

Succulent plants are weakened by excessive fertilizer, and any additional growth is likely to be flimsy and possibly spindly, which promotes the dreaded etiolation that we all work so hard to prevent. Other experts remind us that nurseries feed during the growth period with each watering using a technique called fertigation, in which a tiny amount of food is introduced into the watering system. A monthly feeding regimen is advised by some.

Take into account this knowledge as you discover when to feed succulents and cacti. Giving your succulent plant food immediately before and during its growing season is the goal. This is early spring to late summer, according to experts. Give fertilizer to any plants you have that grow in the winter. Since the majority of us lack knowledge of that sort about all of our plants, we tackle the fertilizer needs of succulents and cacti in a generic manner, such as a spring feeding for all.

This regimen is suitable for the majority of plants. Early in the summer, fertilizer cacti and succulents again may help plants that aren’t growing or aren’t looking good. And if you choose to try a monthly feeding, find out the growing season of the plants you have chosen and check if there is any credible information regarding which feeding schedule is appropriate for them.

Can I feed succulents standard plant food?

For instance, let’s imagine you have a smaller succulent and you want to promote healthy growth, using the jade plant I stated previously as an example. How do you go about that?

Succulents may hold a respectable amount of dissolved nutrients in addition to their propensity for holding water. Your succulent can try to grow too quickly if you overfertilize it. This may make your jade plant appear weedy or stringy because they are far more resilient plants. Weak stems and possibly smaller, more flexible leaves are to be expected. You should avoid overfertilizing.

However, you also don’t want to fertilize too little. If your garden’s soil is sandy and well-draining, inadequate fertilization may lead the plant to appear to be in suspended animation. Although it won’t look horrible, it won’t grow any bigger or normally produce flowers in that manner.

In order for it to develop normally and be able to control its own weight and growth as it grows, the objective is to provide it with what it needs—but just barely enough. The majority of succulents can survive without fertilizer, but even a small amount can persuade the plant that its location is ideal for growth.

What Fertilizer To Use

There aren’t many general fertilizers for succulents available, which is partially due to the wide variety available and the difficulty in determining which to use without knowing the unique plant you have. This can be a problem because many garden centers sell trays of plants with the simple label “assorted succulents.”

If you can, identify the sort of plant you have by going to your local succulent club; you can then find out from them what the best fertilizer combination is for your species. A little aloe vera plant will experience it differently than a huge jade plant or cholla cactus.

But don’t worry if you don’t belong to a succulent club or just are unable to determine the species of your plant on your own. For your succulent, you can use a typical, balanced fertilizer, just in a smaller amount. Usually, I use an all-purpose fertilizer concentrate with the ratio 8-8-8. Make a batch at its normal strength, then use it as fertilizer by diluting it by adding 2–3 times as much water. At that strength, once a month is generally plenty.

When You Need A Special Fertilizer

You could be tempted to purchase a specific fertilizer if you’re attempting to promote flowering, which can be extremely attractive, especially in species like the Christmas cactus. Potassium and phosphorous, particularly the phosphorous, are the components that tend to motivate the plant to bloom while nitrogen promotes the growth of the plant itself.

There are many fertilizers sold as “cactus fertilizers,” both organic and inorganic mixtures that are heavy in everything else and low in nitrogen. But as most of these are intended to be applied straight from the bottle and more frequently than other fertilizers, they have already been greatly diluted. When you’re buying, exercise caution!

Espoma Organic Cactus Food, a concentrated liquid fertilizer, is an exception to this restriction. It dilutes to a 1-2-2 fertilizer when mixed with water. It doesn’t pose a difficulty to fertilize with it once a week to twice a month, and it works fairly effectively to encourage growth and blooming.

Schultz Cactus Plus, another concentrate that dilutions down in water to a 2-7-7 range, is another liquid fertilizer that is marginally more effective. This is particularly effective at encouraging blooming, especially in Christmas cacti and other species with profuse flowers. This is something that is used monthly and only needs a few drops of this with your water to work.

These succulent fertilizers won’t do anything for your plant unless you’re attempting to encourage flowering, and non-flowering succulent species won’t require the extra-high quantities of flowering nutrients. In certain cases, selecting a balanced fertilizer and manually diluting it will suffice.

Other Fertilizer Options

Compost tea is a wonderful choice if you want to give a non-fertilizer alternative a try. You may either buy compost teabags like those made by Malibu Compost or make your own using compost from your own compost pile. Compost teas that have already been concentrated are also offered. Compost tea not only feeds the plant, but it also feeds the beneficial soil bacteria that keep your succulent free of pests and soil issues.

You can use practically any balanced NPK fertilizer for them if you’d prefer a granular slow-release fertilizer to a liquid fertilizer. However, before spreading it around the plants, reduce the recommended amount by half because they actually don’t require so much fertilizer to survive.

Choosing chemical fertilizers over organic ones may be better for those who grow their succulents indoors. Many organic products have a distinct scent that may not be desirable inside. Therefore, if you raise succulents indoors, you might want to think about using a product similar to a well-known commercial brand, such Miracle-succulent Gro’s formula. The smell isn’t as strong in your home!

How To Fertilize Your Succulents

You need to be mindful of how you’re fertilizing your plants. Some succulents may not be used to being wet because they only experience rain in brief bursts. Other types include those that live in jungles and encounter water more as a mist than as regular rainfall. However, you should never apply fertilizer directly to the plant.

The majority of fertilizer mixtures, especially the liquids, can have adverse effects when applied to the leaves or flowers of succulents because the nutrients aren’t absorbed in that method. Always feed your succulents at ground level, ideally all around the perimeter of the plant over the root mass. Using a garden sprayer, apply straight to the soil, being careful not to spray any onto the succulents. A backpack sprayer can also be used for this.

It is a good idea to use something like an indoor watering can for plants that are more closely spaced apart. The watering can’s thin nozzle makes it simple to prevent your plants from being splashed in the face and makes it simple to apply fertilizer where it will be most beneficial: at the plant’s roots.

You should discontinue routine fertilizer during the cold season if you live somewhere with a chilly winter. In colder climates, many succulents frequently enter a dormant state. Winter and fall are not the times to fertilize them because the plant will not benefit from it.

When spring arrives, it’s time to start fertilizing once more. Spring is also a great time to divide and repot any congested plants because it allows them time to settle in before the heat. If you decide to repot your plants in the spring, fertilize them afterward to help them wake up and begin to thrive once more.

In some regions, particularly those that don’t experience strong freezes like some sections of California, there are succulents that can grow over the winter. Although they can be fertilized all year round, these tend to grow most during the winter. It is preferable to fertilize those plants in the fall or early winter, and then monitor their growth to see whether they require more fertilization in the spring.

How frequently should I feed my succulent plants?

Use Miracle-Gro Succulent Plant Food right away to feed succulent plants, especially cactus. All varieties of cactus, jade, aloe, and other well-known succulents are catered for by the recipe. Every two weeks, either apply it straight to the soil or combine it with water and spray it on the plants.

Do succulents need fertilizers in the soil?

Succulents do not require a highly organic substrate to survive, in contrast to other houseplants. In other words, they don’t require planting in nutrient-rich soil. But in order to develop, they still require a specific quantity of organic and inorganic stuff in their growing media.

Even epiphytic tropical cacti need some form of soil in their medium to grow. This is due to the fact that they are acclimated to being produced in a certain soil mixture in agriculture as opposed to their natural habitat.

So, if you’re wondering, “Can I grow succulents in these?” when you see arrangements of succulents in tiny terrariums with sand or gravel, or on rocks or driftwood

The short answer is yes, but there are a few factors to keep in mind. Due to their hardiness, succulents can live in these setups indefinitely depending on how well you take care of them and the environmental factors they are exposed to. Although succulents may endure these circumstances indefinitely, they are not the best ones for them to thrive in.

The succulents will eventually begin to root and search for a better environment to develop in. Tiny containers for succulents, peat moss, sand, or driftwood will eventually become too small for the plant. Some succulents grow larger over time, necessitating the ultimate need to put them in a larger container.

The plants can be removed and re-potted in a more suitable succulent potting mix whenever they begin to outgrow current arrangements. They won’t thrive in these conditions and might even pass away.

In spite of the fact that these projects are lovely and enjoyable to complete, they are only supposed to be temporary solutions. Accept the possibility that some of your plants will pass away and that you will lose some of your favorite plants as well. Starting a new endeavor and enjoying the outcomes is the best part.