Do Succulents Need

Depending on the type, succulents need six hours of sunlight each day because they are light-loving plants. You might need to gradually expose newly planted succulents to full sun exposure or give shade with a translucent screen because they can burn in direct sunshine.

Do indoor succulents require direct sunlight?

It might be challenging for succulents to receive adequate sunlight inside. They typically require 6 hours each day of bright, indirect sunshine outside.

However, indoors, you should put your succulents close to a window that receives light throughout the day. Place your succulents close to the brightest window or area of your house or office if this is not an option.

Watch this video to learn more:

Do succulents prefer outdoor direct sunlight?

Outdoor succulent cultivation might be beneficial to your plants. Succulents nearly always do better when left outside or given some outdoor time, even for brief periods of time, depending on the lighting, humidity, and temperature in your home. The following are some benefits of growing them outside:

a lot of daylight

The likelihood that your plants will receive enough sunlight is higher while growing outdoors. Some settings in your house might not have enough light to give your plants the sunshine they need, depending on the lighting conditions there. At least 4-6 hours of direct sunlight every day, or more, are necessary for succulents to thrive. Your plants will be exposed to the sun’s rays all day if you leave them outside, and you can nearly always count on them getting all the sunshine they require each day.

Rain Water

Your succulent plants will appear healthier, brighter, and much happier if you watch them after a nice rain. Your plants can benefit from the benefits of rainwater. They give your plants the essential nutrients and minerals they need while cleaning out and removing any unwanted buildup from tap water. By removing dust and other debris that can hinder photosynthesis, rainwater aids in the cleaning of plant leaves. When rain is predicted, I also prefer to move my container plants to locations where they may get a nice soaking from the rain. They will profit from the rainwater in this way. Collecting rainwater to use for later irrigation of plants and for watering indoor plants is a good idea.

The impact that precipitation had on my cactus plant was one of my biggest surprises. Last year, during the cold and rainy season, I worried about this cactus plant since I wasn’t sure if it would survive with all the wetness falling on it. This plant’s size doubled as it grew long and plump after the rains the previous year. Look at the dimpling where it developed and extended. Since then, I relocated this cactus plant, which you can see above in its own pot. It is then simpler to move and transport as necessary.

exposed to the elements of nature

To thrive, plants require fresh air. For breathing and photosynthesis, they require oxygen. A plant needs oxygen to grow. Over time, indoor plants may become oxygen-depleted from outside air, and noxious air may accumulate. Dust can build up on the leaves of indoor plants, obstructing the sunlight’s ability to reach the leaves and preventing the plants from breathing effectively. Plants will grow better if their leaves are kept clean and free of debris. Being outside also exposes plants to pollinators, which are essential to their survival in the wild, such bees and birds.

safeguarded against dogs and young children (and vice versa)

You can avoid the hassle of having to keep your pets and young children away from your plants by keeping them outside. Because they are naturally inquisitive, pets and young children might hurt your prized plants by trampling on them, leaping on them, treading on their pots, trampling on their leaves, etc. For a brief while, my young daughter would pick the leaves off of my plants. Thankfully, she quickly realized that this was very unacceptable and had broken the behavior.

In addition, some succulent plants can be poisonous to people and animals if consumed. Some succulents exude chemicals that are unpleasant or toxic to both people and animals. You can avoid the stress of worrying that your cherished pets will get hurt by eating or playing with your plants by keeping your succulents outside. Visit my post on “9 Succulent Plants Toxic To Cats, Dogs or Pets” to discover more about succulents that are toxic to animals.

Although there are numerous potential advantages to growing succulents outside, not everyone should do so. It’s also a good idea to be aware that keeping your plants outside exposes them to possible pests, insects, and animals that could harm them or spread illness.

Personally, I’ve planted succulents both inside and outside. My succulents do better outside because to my local climate and indoor lighting setup, though. Succulents can grow and flourish in a variety of conditions due to their extraordinary attributes and hardiness, which is part of their attraction and the reason we adore them so much.

Do you want to know where to buy succulents online? For suggestions, see my Resource Page.

Do succulents have any requirements?

Succulents grown indoors require watering roughly once per week, but the soil needs to dry out in between. Depending on the temperature, outdoor succulents may not require any watering at all. If a succulent becomes wrinkled or shriveled, it likely needs watering.

Is direct or indirect sunlight preferable for succulents?

I’m regularly asked on Instagram for advice on how to grow succulents, so I thought it would be a good idea to provide those instructions here as well. I consider myself a succulent aficionado, but I am by no means an expert, so let me start there. (Always feel free to correct me!) Given that my plants are all quite robust and numerous, I’d love to share with you what has worked for me.

When cultivating succulents, I’ve discovered that there are three key things to take into account:

Soil

Succulents prefer soil that drains properly. For a while now, I’ve been purchasing a Palm & Cactus mix from Lowes, and it’s been fantastic. I’ve discovered that my soil dries out a little bit too rapidly during the hotter summer months. If your soil doesn’t seem to be holding onto water for long enough, you can add a little bit of ordinary potting soil to your cactus soil to improve water retention. Tea cups, Mason jars, and baby food jars are a few examples of containers I occasionally like to use for my plants because they don’t have drainage holes. To aid with drainage concerns in this situation, I will either add sand to the soil or stack stones on the bottom of the container.

Water

The idea that succulents don’t require much water is a prevalent one. They may be able to go longer lengths of time without it, but they won’t “thrive” in a scenario similar to a drought. This is a lesson I had to learn the hard way when I initially began my collection. My plants would become dry for weeks at a time, and they would not grow. They weren’t also perishng. On the other hand, my mother regularly watered her plants, and they were thriving! I started giving my plants more frequent waterings after deciding she was right. Now, I always recommend watering the soil when it is dry. For me, that is roughly once per week in the summer and a little less in the winter. I water the earth, not the plant, when I water. (I’ve heard that allowing water to collect on the leaves can lead to rot and leave ugly stains.) I soak it thoroughly until the water drains from the bottom of the saucepan. (I don’t soak plants that don’t have drainage holes. I tend to “sip” more.) I frequently witness people overwatering their succulents to death. By making sure the soil is completely dry in between waterings, you may prevent this.

Sunlight

Succulents thrive most in direct but bright sunshine. Different species can tolerate various levels of light, but I’ve noticed that the majority of my plants tend to suffer in prolonged exposure to direct sunshine. Keep your plants where they get a lot of shade but still get enough light to prevent burning and scorching. My healthiest plants can be found outside on window sills, where modest overhangs shield them from direct sunshine. As I previously mentioned, certain plants are more tolerant to direct sunlight than others. To find out what grows best where you live, you simply need to experiment with your plants. Your plants may grow lanky and extend toward the light if they don’t receive enough light. Your plants can be kept growing straight up by rotating the pot occasionally or slowly moving them to a brighter location if they are bending or extending out toward the light. You might want to multiply your lanky succulents. (For further information, see my post on propagating succulents.)

Are succulents water-intensive?

Only water succulents when the soil has totally dried up. There isn’t a standard watering schedule that applies to all succulents in all environments.

Many indoor succulent growers discover that watering their plants every 14 to 21 days keeps them healthy. Use this timeline as a guide and make adjustments if necessary.

The earliest symptoms of underwatering on the leaves are the greatest time to water your succulents. To see what that looks like, have a look at the cheat sheet above.

The best course of action is to wait for a signal from your succulent before watering because most succulents are particularly susceptible to rot with regular watering.

And keep in mind how crucial it is to monitor your watering routine. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve assumed that I haven’t watered in a while, just to discover that it was only a few days ago thanks to my notes in the Succulent Tracker app (Apple | Android).

In this video, learn about a several factors that could influence how frequently you water your succulents:

Succulents can they get too much sun?

Although photosynthesis requires sunshine, certain plants might receive too much of it. While some succulents can be grown in full sun (defined as 6+ hours of direct sunshine each day), not all of them can, and some may even suffer from too much sunlight. Sunburned leaves will appear brown or black and could start to shrink or callus. Moving your plant to a location with less exposure or intense light is the best technique to treat sunburn on that plant. While untouched areas of the plant will continue to be in good health, sunburned leaves will never fully recover.

By observing other leaf symptoms, you can tell sunburn from rot. A plant that has recently been exposed to the light will still have big, thick leaves that have started to turn black or brown but may still be glossy. Older sunburns will be dry, shriveled, or even fully desiccated, and they will be black or brown in color. The appearance of rotted and overly wet leaves will be mushy and wrinkled.

If a plant at the store or one you own has sunburn, it probably wasn’t properly cared for and was exposed to too much light at some point rather than being sick and dying rapidly. Remember that burnt segments frequently shrink up, so even though the plant may not seem attractive, it may still be healthy and continue to grow for many years. The easiest approach to avoid purchasing plants with sunburns is to only purchase them from local, independent nurseries and vendors rather than big-box retailers, where this kind of damage is more likely to be visible.

These advice should aid you in identifying and treating any problems that may exist with your succulents. For you to always bring home a plant that can be your companion for years to come, we’ll be showing you things to avoid when shopping for plants and succulents in our upcoming post!

Where should indoor succulents be placed?

Succulents thrive in hot, arid conditions and don’t mind a little neglect due to their unique capacity to store water. They are therefore ideally suited to growing indoors and are the perfect choice for anyone looking for low-maintenance houseplants. Follow these instructions for successful plant care if you’re choosing succulents for the first time.

Select a succulent that will thrive in your indoor environment.

The majority of succulents need direct sunshine, however if your home only has a shady area, choose low light-tolerant plants like mother-in-tongue. law’s A trailing variety, like string of bananas, is an excellent option if you intend to grow your succulent in a hanging planter. To learn about your succulents’ requirements for sunlight, size, and spread, always read the plant labels.

Give the plants a good draining potting material.

You should repot your succulent as soon as you get it home since nurseries always plant their succulents in soil that is overly rich and holds too much moisture. A coarse potting mix with sufficient drainage and aeration is a good place to start. You can use an African violet mix or unique cactus and succulent mixtures that you can purchase at the nursery. Add perlite or pumice to the cactus or African violet mix (up to 50% of the total potting mix, depending on your particular succulent’s moisture requirements) to further increase drainage and prevent compaction. To make sure the mixture is moist throughout, always moisten it before using.

Decide on a container.

When repotting, use a container that is at least 1 to 2 inches bigger than the nursery container and has a drainage hole. Avoid using glass containers (such mason jars or terrariums) for long-term potting since they prevent roots from breathing and over time may result in root rot. Place your plant inside the container and backfill with extra pre-moistened potting mix after filling the bottom one-third of the container with pre-moistened potting mix.

Put the succulent plant in a pot somewhere sunny.

Try to arrange your succulents close to a south or east-facing window because most succulents need at least six hours of sun each day. Insufficient sunlight may cause your succulents to become spindly or to extend toward the light.

Between waterings, allow the potting mix to dry out.

Overwatering succulents is the most common error people make with them. Watering more deeply but less frequently is preferable. Before the next watering, completely saturate the potting mix (while making sure the water drains out of the drainage hole properly). The plant can finally perish if the potting soil is left moist every day.

Succulents should be fertilized at least once a year.

Fertilizer works best for plants in the spring (when the days lengthen and new growth starts) and again in the late summer. Use a water-soluble, balanced fertilizer (such as 8-8-8 or 10-10-10) that has been diluted to half the strength indicated on the container. Since succulents are semi-dormant in the winter, there is no need to nourish them. Because they are not actively growing, they do not require the nutrient boost.