Why Leaves Turn Brown On Houseplants

Should you trim your indoor plants’ brown leaves?

The following links may be affiliate links; please read the disclaimer. I will receive a commission if you click through and buy something without charging you more.

We’ve experienced our fair share of brown, decaying leaves as we’ve learned how to properly care for various home plants over the years. We weren’t sure at first whether to take them out or leave them. Here is what we’ve discovered works the best.

Do you need to remove the dead leaves? Yes. Your indoor plants should have brown and withering leaves removed as quickly as possible, but only if they are more than 50% damaged. By removing these leaves, the plant looks better and the healthy foliage that is left can receive more nutrients.

Even though it might appear straightforward, there’s more to it than merely cutting those leaves off. To keep your plant healthy, you must assess how much of the leaf is dying and then carefully remove the damaged areas.

Why are the leaves on my plants fading to brown?

Typically, underwatering, sunburn, or overwatering are the causes of browning leaves.

The soil possibly grew too dry for an extended period of time between waterings if the leaf tips are turning brown and hard. The plant may lose leaves as a result of this. This does not necessarily imply that you are regularly underwatering because the browning may have only occurred once. Although the brown leaf tips won’t turn green again, you can trim the brown margins to restore the plant’s healthy appearance. Go here to learn more.

It may also be a symptom of overwatering if you see brown patches all over the leaves. You’ll typically notice some yellowing of the leaves as well when the plant is overwatered. Go here to learn more.

If you see brown stains in the middle of the leaves, it may be because the leaves are receiving too much direct sunshine. Some plants are readily burned by direct sunlight and are sensitive to it. If this is the case, try shifting your plant to a spot where it won’t be exposed to the sun’s glare.

– If you move your plants from indoors to outdoors in the summer without acclimating them to direct sunshine, this is usually what happens.

How frequently ought indoor plants to be watered?

Although watering houseplants may seem like a straightforward operation, many people either overwater them or neglect them until they get parched. Generally speaking, the potting soil for indoor plants should be kept damp but not soggy. In the spring and summer, they typically need watering once or twice a week; in the fall and winter, they require less watering. However, this isn’t always the case, depending on the kind of houseplant.

  • Only give orchids a small bit of water once a week to water them.
  • Succulents and cacti need relatively little water. When the potting mix has dried out, only water.
  • Water citrus plants more frequently and consistently than you would other houseplants.

The Westland Watering Indicator makes it easier to know when to water. This watering stick is very simple to use and may be used all year round. Just insert the stick into the pot of compost. The indicator will then turn red to let you know when the plant needs extra water. When no additional water is required, the indicator will turn blue. Within two hours of watering the plant, the indicator’s color should shift from red to blue.

Another crucial factor is the type of water used on indoor plants. This is due to the fact that many plants are sensitive to the salts and chemicals found in tap water. So it is advisable to use rainwater to water your plants.

Feeding

To promote lush, robust growth, indoor plants must be fed while they are developing. Only while a houseplant is actively developing, not when it is dormant, should it be fed.

During the growing season (spring and summer), the majority of indoor plants need typically be fed every other watering, or around every 10 to 14 days. In the fall and winter, feed indoor plants after every fourth watering because they will need fewer nutrients.

Using a liquid concentrate feed is a good approach to feed houseplants. These are a fantastic way to feed and water your plant simultaneously. They work best, though, when the mixture isn’t created too powerful or too weak. Given that it is filled with the necessary nutrients, Westland Houseplant Feed is a fantastic plant food for indoor plants. Additionally, it contains a simple measure doser that requires only a squeeze of the bottle to fill the dosing chamber. Any extra plant food will be removed by the doser, leaving you with a 5ml dose to mix with 1 liter of water. This indicates that the combination you use to feed your plants is the proper strength.

The list of specialized feeds for various types of indoor plants that include the precise ratio of nutrients required for their growth is provided below.

  • Feed for succulents and cacti offers nutrients that improve flowering.
  • Citrus feed: provides nutrients that promote fruit development and set.

Do dark leaves indicate an excess of water?

One of the major problems I notice with modern landscaping is overwatering the plants. These are some of the few indicators of overwatering plants. It is tempting to give plants more water when they don’t appear healthy, but this is frequently a mistake. An overwatering error is difficult to identify because it frequently seems like a water shortage.

The following six indicators can help you assess if you are overwatering your plants or not:

Your plant is wilting but it looks like it has plenty of water

For survival and growth, plant roots absorb both water and oxygen. Simply put, if you give your plants too much water, they will drown. In your garden, there is gap between the soil granules. It is filled with oxygen. Continuously soggy soil won’t have enough air spaces, which prevents plants from breathing by using their roots to absorb oxygen. When this happens, even while the soil is moist, your plants will wilt, giving the appearance that they are not getting enough water. Here is a fantastic video explaining the drawbacks of giving your plants too much water from our colleagues at Denver Water.

The tips of the leaves turn brown

The tip of the leaf is one of the first and quickest indications that you have overwatered your plants. Overwatering is evident if the leaf’s tip is turning brown. When your plant receives too much water, the leaves become limp and squishy, while when it receives too little water, the leaves feel dry and crispy to the touch.

Leaves turn brown and wilt

When plants receive either too little or too much water, their leaves wilt and turn brown. The greatest distinction is that too little water causes the leaves to feel crunchy in your palm. The leaves will feel floppy and mushy in your palm if there is too much water present.

EDMA

Water pressure starts to build in the leaf cells when a plant’s roots take up more water than they can utilise. Eventually, the cells will burst, killing them and causing blisters that resemble lesions. Where the blisters formerly were, tan, brown, or white warty growths start to appear after they erupt. On the top surfaces of the leaves, you will also notice indentations developing directly above the growths.

Leaf fall

Both scenarios of too much and too little water result in leaf fall. When buds don’t develop and both new and old leaves fall off before they should, there is definitely too much water in the soil.

How do you fix overwatering?

Examine your soil frequently. Never be hesitant to stick your finger a few inches into the ground to check the moisture level. Reduce your water use if the soil is wet and you meet some of the other requirements. Additionally, several shops offer reasonably priced moisture meters. To find out how much water is in the soil, simply bury them in the root ball. This is a straightforward, low-cost instrument that will eliminate a lot of the guesswork involved in watering your environment.

I sincerely hope that these suggestions will be useful, and I invite you to add a couple of your own to prevent overwatering your plants in the section below. Please consider subscribing to the blog and following me on Twitter at @H2OTrends if you liked this post.

How frequently ought I to water my plants?

Outdoor garden plants improve landscapes, while indoor houseplants beautify the home and add a touch of natural d├ęcor. Giving them enough water is necessary to maintain them strong and luscious. Those who have never gardened or had houseplants are probably going to have some queries.

How often should plants be watered?

Use enough water to wet the soil to a depth of about 6 inches each time you water, once or twice per week. Although the soil’s top can dry out in between waterings, the soil itself should stay moist.

How much water do plants need a day?

Plants don’t require watering every day. Instead, irrigate sparingly but profoundly. Deep waterings allow the water to permeate the soil beneath the roots, which promotes downward root growth.

How do you properly water plants?

Instead of using a sprinkler, which can leave water on the foliage and increase the danger of hazardous fungal development, it is generally advised to water plants at ground level.

Is it better to water plants or depend on rain?

Although outdoor plants like natural rain, if it doesn’t fall at least an inch every week, you might want to water your plants to ensure that they have enough moisture for strong plant growth.

Can I cut leaf edges that are brown?

As you make your way through your house, pause to inspect all of your indoor and outdoor houseplants. Cut away any dead leaves, dormant stems, or brown areas of the leaves that you see.

When possible, it’s okay to remove dead leaves or stems with your hands; just be careful not to pull too firmly or you risk damaging the healthy section of your plant. Use pruning shears or scissors to cut through harder stems or to remove brown leaf margins and tips. To avoid spreading any diseases or pests, remember to clean your shears between each plant.

What symptoms indicate overwatering?

To keep your plants healthy, watch out for these five signs of overwatering:

1. If a plant is overwatered, it will probably produce limp, droopy leaves that are yellow or brown rather than dry, crispy leaves (which are a sign of too little water). Wilting leaves and soggy ground typically indicate that root rot has taken hold and the roots are unable to absorb water.

2. You’ve probably overwatered if your plant is losing both old and new leaves at the same time. Bear in mind that the leaves that are falling off can be green, brown, or yellow.

3. You’ve overwatered the plant if the base of the stem starts to feel mushy or unsteady. Even a foul odor may start to come from the earth.

4. An overwatering-related bacterial infection appears as brown spots or margins around the leaves that are surrounded by a yellow halo.

5. If you have repeatedly overwatered your plants, fungus or mold may develop directly on top of the soil, similar to symptom number three. Fungus gnats are another typical indicator of overwatering.

How can you determine if a plant is being watered too much or too little?

Since the signs of underwatering and overwatering sometimes resemble one another, we’re here to explain what each sign might signify. Check your plant for the following indicators of water stress to determine which you are now experiencing.

Wilting: In order to distinguish between overwatering and underwatering, check the soil around the plant. Overwatering occurs when the soil is wet; underwatering occurs when the soil is dry.

Another symptom that can go either way is browning edges.

Determine which by touching the leaf that is beginning to brown; if it feels light and crispy, it has been submerged. It is overwatered if it seems limp and soft.

Yellowing foliage: Yellow leaves are a sign of overwatering and are typically accompanied by new growth dying off. However, lower leaves that are yellow and curled may also be a symptom of underwatering. To determine which one it might be, check the soil for dampness.

Bad smell coming from the earth: Bad odors from the soil may be a sign that the roots have been overwatered and are decomposing.

Do houseplants require sunlight?

  • Choose a plant whose lighting needs match those of your house or workplace.
  • A lack of natural sunshine can be compensated for by additional lighting.
  • To suit your needs and budget, artificial lighting is available in a wide variety of forms and sizes.

One of the most crucial elements for cultivating indoor plants is light. For photosynthesis, the process by which plants turn light, oxygen, and water into carbohydrates, all plants need light (energy).

This energy is necessary for plants to develop, bloom, and set seed. Without enough light, plants cannot produce carbohydrates, their energy stores run out, and they eventually die.