How To Keep Your Houseplants Alive

Although the guidelines are generally the same for all plants, they may vary significantly based on the setting in which your plant will be residing. This section is for you if you’re mostly interested in learning how to care for indoor plants that are potted. Here are our top suggestions for maintaining indoor plants:

Choose the Correct Pot

Drainage is crucial for the health of your plant. A pot’s bottom should ideally have a hole in it so that any surplus water can drain out of the soil and gather in a tray beneath the pot. The excess water is held in the soil if there isn’t a hole like this. Frequently, this is more water than the plant can effectively absorb, which causes a plant to “drown.” The likelihood that you have a drainage issue and the plant is excessively wet increases if you observe that your plant is wilted and drooping but the soil is still damp.

Similar to people, plants require a large amount of area to grow. The plant will become top-heavy and the roots won’t be able to maintain the amount of foliage on your plant if the roots don’t have enough room to spread out. It will wilt and die as a result of this.

While leaving the plant in the pot or basket it came in is the simplest option, it’s not always the greatest for maintaining the health and vitality of your plant. Your plant needs to be in a pot that allows it room to expand and spread its roots if you want it to remain healthy. It will also need a pot with sufficient drainage.

Use Good Potting Soil

You should also consider the type of potting soil you’re using if you’re repotting your houseplant out of the container it came in and into a better pot. Simply taking some dirt out of your backyard is insufficient. Purchase a bag of potting soil instead. These mixtures frequently include additional nutrients or fertilizers to keep your houseplant strong and healthy.

You might be able to locate a potting mixture made especially for the species of plant you’re working with. There are frequently potting soils made with the precise nutrients for certain plants, such as cacti and succulents, if you’re planting one of them.

Watering: Not Too Much and Not Too Little

Watering might be somewhat challenging, especially if you’re not experienced with plant care. If you water your plant excessively, it could quickly drown. If a plant receives insufficient water, it will dry out and die. You need to strike a fine balance between these two extremes if you want happy, healthy plants. The majority of plants thrive when the soil dries out between waterings, even though other plants like to dwell in damp soil.

Feel the soil, preferably close to the edge of the pot, to determine whether or not your plant needs water. It’s time to water if the dirt seems dry and crumbly. It most likely doesn’t require more at this time if it still feels damp. You ought to get the hang of sensing when your plants need water after a few weeks of practice.

Naturally, you’ll be able to tell if your plants are dehydrating. Your plant needs water immediately if the leaves start to become dry, brown, and shriveled. However, ideally, you’ll water your plant well before it reaches this stage.

Water your plant until the soil no longer absorbs any more water or until the water starts to run out of the hole in the bottom of the container. It’s time to stop watering if water starts to collect on top of the soil and the soil stops absorbing any more water.

Given that each plant and each plant species is unique, it is challenging to specify with precision how frequently you should water your plant. To learn more about your particular plant, you can do some research online, but generally speaking, it’s best to listen to your plant when it needs water. Learn to read a plant’s soil and leaves so that you can tell when it needs water.

Give Them Plenty of Light

Although each plant prefers various amounts of shade or sunlight, none will grow in complete darkness. Your plant won’t thrive if you place it in a closet, high up on a shadowy shelf, or tucked away in a dark corner.

To thrive, your plant requires at least some sunlight. Because of this, windowsills are excellent locations for plants. However, if your windowsill isn’t big enough, you still have other choices. Place them in front of a window or somewhere with lots of natural light, on a table or a cart.

Keep Your Pet Away

Although it should go without saying, if you’re unfamiliar with houseplants, you might not have considered it. Animals may like your plants, but sadly, they frequently do so to the point of death. Specifically, your pet could consume or destroy your plant out of excitement.

Try putting your houseplants in areas where your pet can’t access them to solve this issue. Maybe place them on top of a cupboard or high up on the counter. Just remember to strike a balance between putting the plant somewhere safe and making sure it gets sunlight.

There are numerous plants that are poisonous to animals, therefore keeping plants and pets apart is also important to keep in mind.

Learn About Your Plant

Whether you’re taking care of garden plants, hanging outdoor baskets, indoor houseplants, or something else else, this is a fundamental precept of plant care. Spend some time getting to know the kind of plant you are taking care of. Find out how much shade or sun it prefers. Find out if it need daily watering or if it can go up to two weeks without it.

Every plant has a distinct set of needs of its own. While there are many general guidelines that can be applied to most plants, learning about each kind of plant separately will yield the best outcomes and the highest success rate.

Why keep dying my house plants?

A fresh wave of interest is being seen in house plants. This is fantastic news for Good Earth Plant Company. Since plants provide so many advantages for your health, it has been our purpose for more than 40 years to inspire people to incorporate nature into the places they work, live, and play.

Finding a spot in your house for a brand-new plant is enjoyable. However, after a few days, weeks, or months, you start to realize that it isn’t quite as fresh and green. Perhaps the leaves are dropping off or turning yellow. Or it’s just blatantly weak. How can you help? Can you bring back a dead plant? Must you attempt?

You should definitely give it your best shot. All plants have a natural urge to live. It’s incredibly satisfying to bring back a plant or a set of roots that you believe are dead. If it fails, you will have tried, and you may have learned something for the future.

For our clients, our horticulture technicians take care of thousands of plants. When they see a plant isn’t performing properly, they must first make a diagnostic and determine what is wrong in order to know what kind of remedy is required. Here are some advice we have for you if you operate as a home or office amateur horticultural technician.

Diagnosis: Overwatering. Cure: Stop watering so much.

a typical instance of overwatering This plant is NOT cared for by Good Earth Plant Company!

The main cause of indoor plant death is this. People water their plants, which kills them gently. Watering a plant on a daily basis won’t help if the roots have rotted due to overwatering. Rotted roots frequently allow a pathogen to enter the plant, which then kills it. Replace any mud-covered soil and any roots that are plainly rotting. To a little damp to completely dry state, let the soil dry. You might not be able to save it even then.

Diagnosis: Underwatering. Cure: Hydrate the plant.

Even in the heat, even if you may think your plant is pleading for water, don’t go overboard. Make sure to check often. Image: Tookapic, under a Creative Commons license

If the plant is wilting from a lack of water, hydrate the soil by submerging the entire pot for 15 to 30 minutes in a sink or pail of water. Watering from the top will probably run down the sides since the soil has become into a dried, hard brick. Don’t let the water sit on your plant; instead, let it drain completely. Then either get a plant that requires the least amount of watering, like a succulent, or set a calendar reminder to water.

Diagnosis: Potbound. Cure: Replant into fresh soil.

Try to avoid making the initial purchase of a rootbound plant. When it reaches this stage, gently divide and trim the plant, then repotted it in a slightly bigger container.

If the plant’s roots are getting choked out as a result of being overcrowded, you need to take it out of the container, gently separate the roots, and then repot it in new soil. Pick a pot that is just a little bit bigger than the one you are taking it out of. Going too far, too quickly, might lead to issues.

Diagnosis: Too much sun. Cure: Move into less harsh light.

Avoid allowing summertime sunshine coming in via windows to burn your indoor plants. Place them in a secure area. Image by Yanoch Kandreeva under a Creative Commons license

If you find brown or black spots on the leaves of a plant, check to see if it is receiving direct midday sunlight from a nearby window. Your plant is severely burnt and sunburned. Remove the plant from the direct sun and trim the leaves.

Diagnosis: Too little sun. Cure: Give it more indirect light.

In low-light environments where a live plant would struggle to thrive, it is sometimes preferable to employ replica plants.

It may not be getting enough sunshine if your plant’s leaves are slowly turning yellow or pale or falling off. The majority of hardy house plants can withstand some minor maltreatment, but they require a certain quantity of sunlight to survive. The greatest spot to start with your plants is in bright indirect sun. Without sufficient light, growing a plant is doomed to failure.

Diagnosis: Failure to thrive. Cure: Check the growing conditions.

Avoid over-trimming your plant in the summer to avoid stressing it. Never cut your indoor plants more than 25%. Creative Commons license for the image

Make sure you are aware of the circumstances your specific plant loves and make sure its location meets these requirements if there isn’t an obvious culprit, such as overwatering. Then determine whether the temperature at your office or home is too high or low for the plant. Check to see if the air conditioning is on in the building to see if the plant is getting burned while you’re away if it is left unattended in an office over the weekend. Another issue is when a plant is placed next to a vent that blasts chilly air.

No matter what is happening, you should never fertilize a weak plant. Both chicken soup and antibiotics are not fertilizer. Cut back any stems or leaves that are starting to wilt. Leave at least a few leaves for the sun to absorb and absorb. Make sure the plant’s container has sufficient drainage coming out the bottom. When it starts to grow again and you notice fresh growth, you should think about giving it a boost with a general water-soluble fertilizer.

Consider replica plants if you have a brown or black thumb or if you struggle to maintain your plants. There are so many wonderful ones out there, as we noted in our article from last week. We won’t condemn you.

Another choice is to hire experts! Do you employ someone to groom your dog or replace your oil? Call Good Earth Plant Company, and we’ll be pleased to maintain the health and growth of your plants. You can claim full credit.

How frequently should you water a houseplant?

How frequently should houseplants be watered? Most indoor plants require watering every one to three weeks. You should keep an eye on your houseplants and only water them when they actually need it. The size and kind of the plant, the size and type of the container, the temperature, the humidity, and the rate of development will all affect how often to water.

Continue reading, and I’ll offer you the information you need to water your houseplants correctly every time. Once you know how to tell when your houseplants need watering, it’s not difficult to make the right decision.

How long can a home plant be maintained?

The typical lifespan of a houseplant is thought to be between two and five years, but even that isn’t the be-all and end-all. Annual plants are the only ones whose lifespan can be accurately predicted because they only have one growing season. The truth is that with proper care, houseplants can occasionally live for decades.

Houseplants normally don’t pass away at a specific age or as they mature, unlike people or animals. (Some plants, like grafted cacti, do have a shorter lifespan as a result of being made up of two different plant parts, though.) The majority of plant deaths are caused by environmental, climatic, and care-related causes.

On Watering

People frequently worry that they aren’t watering enough when, in reality, they are watering excessively! Plants don’t like to have “wet feet,” a term used to describe when their roots are completely soaked after spending days submerged in water.

Weighing a plant is the most reliable way to determine how much water it needs. The more you weigh the plant’s container as you pick it up, the more you can tell that the plant needs a drink. Unless unless stated, most houseplants would rather be a little bit dry than drenched in water.

This indicates that for the majority of plants, an infrequent but thorough watering frequency of once or twice per week is sufficient. When I water my houseplants, I slowly and deliberately pour water onto the soil until the water begins to leak out of the drainage holes of the container. Your cue to cease watering is there!

A plant normally requires watering only a few times each month during the winter.

The simplest technique to capture that extra water and avoid a mess is to place a tray underneath the potted plant’s container. If you want a simple, unadorned plastic tray, you can get one of them for a few dollars. As an alternative, you might spend more money and get more attractive trays.

For houseplants, buying a cheap spray bottle is also beneficial. One or two gentle mists per day are typically good. Keep in mind that misting and humidity are necessary in order to mimic the natural habitat for these plants.

Brighten Up!

Water is essential, but so is light. To complete their vital biological activities, all plants require light. Photosynthesis, you’ve got my attention!

All plants require some light to develop, although some need far less than others. Recall their natural environment and picture the gloomy underbrush where these plants can be found. They receive light that has been extensively filtered, but they still move.

Most houseplants need low light (four to six hours per day), medium light (six or more hours per day), or high light (less than three hours a day). Plants will either need strong, direct light (such as sunshine coming through a south-facing window) or soft, filtered light (sunlight through a curtain or light from a bulb).

Plants won’t necessarily die if they don’t get enough light, but they will cease growing new things.

Fertilizing Time

While plants use photosynthesis to convert the sugars they require for survival, they also require a more direct source of nutrition to carry out growth activities. Your indoor plants will remain happy and healthy if you give them fertilizer.

The food can be applied more directly using a water soluble fertilizer or as a granule that degrades over time. Water soluble fertilizers should be applied every two weeks or so, while granules typically only need to be applied once every few months. To find out what is advised, read the directions on the fertilizer in question.