When To Buy Hydrangea Plants

During the growth season, nurseries will have potted hydrangeas for sale. If at all possible, purchase your plant when it is in bloom to ensure that you have the flower kind and color that you desire. To see the hydrangea’s roots, you should be able to lift or slide (lay the plant on its side) it out of its container. White roots with brownish tips represent healthy roots. Don’t buy it if the soil smells like sewer gas and the roots are discolored. That plant has root issues, and after it is planted, it might not survive.

When should hydrangeas be planted?

Learning the fundamentals of how to plant hydrangeas can help you save time and money, just like with most other items in your garden. You’ll improve your chances of enjoying big, vibrant hydrangea flowers for years to come by picking the appropriate site, getting the soil just right, and planting correctly.

When should I plant hydrangeas?

The best time to grow hydrangeas is in the fall, followed by early spring. The goal is to provide the shrub lots of time to develop a strong root system before it blooms. Early in the day or late in the day are the ideal times to plant. The day’s cooler hours provide relief from heat exhaustion. Water new plants frequently until they get established.

Locations to plant hydrangeas

The first step is knowing where to grow hydrangea plants. Hydrangeas are frequently grown in beds adjacent to houses or fences. This is so because hydrangeas prefer the mild early sun to the hot afternoon sun. A protected area with sunny mornings and shaded afternoons is the ideal spot to plant hydrangeas. This is frequently found on the north or south side of a house. Avoid planting underneath trees since it could cause competition for nutrients and water. Flowers and leaves can both be destroyed by strong winds.

hydrangea-friendly soil

The soil needs to be rich in organic matter for hydrangeas to thrive. Drainage is important. Although hydrangeas prefer damp soil, they cannot stand standing water. Root rot can be brought on by wet, poorly draining soils. Your hydrangeas could pass away in a matter of weeks. Consider adding a lot of compost to your heavy soil before planting to increase the soil’s quality.

Methods for planting hydrangeas

Simply dig planting holes that are 2 feet wider than the root ball for planting hydrangeas. So that your plant lies level with or just higher than the surrounding soil, match the depth of the hole to the size of the root ball. You can improve water drainage away from the plant’s base by making a small mound.

The best way to grow hydrangeas

Simple propagation methods can multiply a single hydrangea into several more. The optimal time to layer bigleaf and panicle hydrangeas is in the early to mid-summer. You only need to:

  • Close to your hydrangea plant, make a tiny trench.
  • Bend a branch such that the middle of the branch meets the earth in the trench (six to 12 inches of branch should extend past the trench).
  • Where the branch meets the trench soil, make scuff marks on the bark.
  • After the trench is filled, cover it with a paver, brick, or stone.
  • The branch can be transplanted to a different area once it has established its own root system over time.

Hydrangeas with smooth or oakleaf leaves produce new growth from underground stems. Simply separate the baby plant from the main plant by digging it up. After then, it can be moved to a new spot.

Can hydrangeas still be planted now?

VERY IMPORTANT: Pick a spot where your hydrangea will be able to grow to its full size without being pruned. For hydrangeas of average size, aim for a height of at least 4 ft. X 4 ft. It is nearly impossible to keep hydrangeas clipped to a size that is smaller than what they ultimately want to grow.

Plant in a soil that drains properly! Add roughage, such pine bark mulch, to heavy soil (make sure it’s ground BARK, not ground WOOD).

Avoid planting seeds too deeply. Plant at the same depth at which the hydrangea was potted.

When a hydrangea has lost all of its leaves and gone dormant, transplant it (late fall or winter).

Does hydrangea regrowth occur annually?

Hydrangeas will indeed reappear each year if they do not perish during the winter. Though not all gift hydrangeas are bred to grow especially winter-hardy. Thus, hydraneas occasionally do not endure the winter. However, most hydrangeas will reappear each year.

When may I put a hydrangea in a planter outside?

Anytime of the year is suitable for planting a potted hydrangea in the ground. The ideal seasons are, however, spring or autumn. Plant either in early fall when the soil will still be warm and before the frosts or after the spring frosts have passed.

Do hydrangeas like shade or the sun?

With the ideal balance of morning sun and afternoon shade, hydrangeas flourish. Even the sun-loving Hydrangea paniculata will thrive in some shade. Some hydrangea cultivars may survive complete shadow, though.

The oakleaf hydrangea, also known as hydrangea quercifolia, is a substantial species of hydrangea that may reach heights of up to eight feet. In a shade garden, this big bush makes a beautiful backdrop. The height will provide excellent midsummer seclusion. Oakleaf hydrangeas are summer bloomers with mostly white blooms, elegant oakleaf-shaped leaves, and lovely peeling bark.

Hydrangea anomala ssp. petiolaris is another choice for full shade. This climbing species, which has lacy, white blossoms in the summer, can reach a height of 50 feet if it is given adequate support. The foliage is a rich shade of green and would look wonderful growing up a tree trunk or covering the face of a building. It would also look lovely covering the roof of a garden shed.

Full shade cultivars require the same upkeep as partial shade. In the deeper shade, it will be especially crucial to keep the plants free of leaf litter and with excellent airflow. Water your plant once a week after it has become established. Keep a watch on the leaves, and if you notice any drooping, especially during the hot summer months, water them right away. The importance of this increases in hotter regions.

These leaves’ unique shape would be a lovely complement to Hosta leaves. The white blossoms would contrast nicely with the lighter hues of your shady blooms and provide some brilliant brightness to your shaded locations.

Shade Varieties

There are a few different hydrangea cultivars that thrive in the shade. Some types can even thrive in zones 3 (which doesn’t warm up until later in the spring), which is one of the coldest growing regions. Let’s examine some of the best shade selections!

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Snow queen’

The movie “Snow queen” is stunning. The flowers are stunning, as they are with all hydrangeas. These rose blush-colored blossoms appear in the middle of summer. The foliage of this plant is my favorite component. The leaves begin the season in a very deep green, gradually changing to a deep reddish bronze color, and finally finishing in that shade, offering a stunning splash of color to your fall landscape.

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Alice’

With a height ranging between 12 and 15 feet, this Oakleaf Hydrangea is one among the biggest. In the summer, this plant blooms with incredibly deep cream-colored flowers. A woodland garden would be a truly lovely place for “Alice.” This cultivar would look especially beautiful if it were grown as a bordering hedge.

Hydrangea arborescens ‘Annabelle’

‘Annabelle’ enjoys partial shade and has some of the largest flowers in the hydrangea family (12 inches wide!). These enormous blossoms can be supported all season long by the sturdy stalks. This shrub can grow up to five feet tall and five feet broad, so give it plenty of area to expand. These enormous, all-white blossoms bloom for a long time.

In a mass planting, as a specimen shrub, or as a foundation planting, “Annabelle” would look lovely. These bushes should still be included in your cutting garden. Imagine a bunch of flowers that large! Wow!

Where to plant hydrangeas:

  • A location with morning sun and afternoon shade is ideal. They’ll take more sun if you reside further north (possibly full sun all day).
  • Think about the mature size and give it lots of room to expand.
  • Pick a location with great drainage. If necessary, add compost to the soil.
  • Plants won’t thrive if they are planted too close to a tree because of root competition and a lack of sunshine.
  • Planting should not be done in open locations where strong winds could snap stems.

How to plant hydrangeas:

  • By amending your soil with up to 15% organic matter and an all-purpose slow-release fertilizer, you may give your plant a good start (use half of what is recommended).
  • Plant a little higher than you did while you were in the nursery container.
  • In order to give the roots plenty of freedom to expand, the planting hole should be two to three times broader than the root ball.
  • Before planting, gently untie the roots from their pots.
  • Add the modified dirt back in and thoroughly water it.
  • Planting in groups requires a minimum distance of 3 feet (more, if planting larger varieties).

Planting hydrangeas in pots:

  • Put potting soil in a bag rather than garden dirt.
  • Slow-release fertilizer should be added.
  • For watering, leave 1 to 2 inches between the soil’s top and the pot’s rim.
  • Make sure the pot includes space for the plant to grow and drainage holes.

Can hydrangeas be planted in February?

The optimal time to transplant hydrangeas is right after the autumn dormancy of the plants. This indicates that all of the flowers have withered away and that most or all of the leaves have fallen.

  • The optimum time to move hydrangea shrubs in colder locations is in November, when the bushes are dormant but the ground is not completely frozen.
  • You can transplant hydrangeas in warmer regions where the ground doesn’t freeze between December and February.

While these are the ideal times to move hydrangea bushes, you may actually do so at any time of the year as long as it is not the hottest part of the year.

hydrangeas difficult to grow?

The hydrangea plant is adaptable and simple to grow. They have no preference as to where they are planted. All they require is well-drained soil, some water, and some summertime shade.

Do hydrangeas thrive in complete shade?

It’s no surprise that hydrangeas have grown to be so well-liked among gardeners given their profusion of blossoms and remarkable adaptability. There is a hydrangea for almost every garden because there are so many different types. They are certain to provide you happiness year after year if you give them a sunny place with well-draining soil. Will hydrangeas flourish in the shadow, though?

Full sun (more than 6 hours of direct sunlight) to part sun is ideal for hydrangea growth (4-6 hours sun). All hydrangeas can tolerate some shade, but the timing and nature of the shade should be taken into account. As long as they receive some early sun, they can spend the warmest part of the day in complete shade. In sweltering conditions, this is especially true. They don’t flower as frequently, though, and their stems tend to be weaker and floppier if they don’t get enough sun.

Don’t let a little shadow ruin your plans for a hydrangea garden. A list of hydrangeas that can tolerate shadow better than others has been assembled.

My hydrangea won’t make it through the winter.

The hydrangea is a hardy plant that can endure the winter and is not susceptible to freezing conditions. Tub plants, however, are susceptible to the soil freezing solidly. Since of the bad weather, branches and buds can dry out because the roots can no longer provide moisture. By preserving the hydrangea, you can stop this. How should winter hydrangeas be protected? This article will teach you all of this and more!

What occurs if your hydrangeas aren’t pruned?

If and when you prune is the key to happy, healthy hydrangea flowers. Of course, fertilizing and offering the ideal environment have a lot to recommend them. However, if you don’t prune properly, your efforts will be in vain. Deadheading is not the same as trimming. Pruning refers to more drastic cutting to preserve shape or remove dead growth. However, feel free to discard spent blossoms or cut fresh ones to use in arrangements.

Hydrangeas can bloom on either fresh wood or old wood, depending on the species. The wood from which they blossom determines whether and when to prune.

Old wood-blooming hydrangeas do not require pruning and benefit from it. They’ll blossom more abundantly the next season if you leave them alone. But feel free to deadhead or gently thin. Just keep in mind that while new growth may appear, it won’t bloom until the following season. In our region, four different species blossom on aged wood. Additionally, they are not limited to the hues displayed here.

Climb using suckers. On your wall or trellis, resist the desire to remove the dormant growth.

The flower heads are more conical in appearance, and the leaves are large and resemble oak leaves. It’s a pleasant surprise for a hydrangea when its leaves turn reddish-orange in the fall.

They are very comparable to lacecap types, but smaller and with more compact leaves.

Pruning should be done in late winter or early spring on hydrangeas that bloom on new wood. Trim back to two feet to prune to shape. The next season’s blossoms are produced by strong, fresh growth that is encouraged by trimming. In our region, there are two types that bloom on fresh wood. They are also not restricted to the colors displayed.

Oakleaf variants are not included in cone-shaped blooms. Keep the blooms on throughout the winter to provide interest; even dried out, they are quite lovely.

regarded as a wild kind. They often have smaller blooms and leaves than Bigleaf variants and are completely white. They enjoy full sun and can grow very tall.

Knowing whether or when to prune now will help you avoid the disappointment of a hydrangea that doesn’t blossom. Don’t forget that a robust shrub will produce more gorgeous blossoms if it has well-draining soil and good organic fertilizer. Come on in, and we’ll show you where to go to develop your green thumb.