Why Does Fiddle Leaf Fig Has Black On Leaves

Brown leaves on a fiddle leaf fig are most frequently caused by a fungal infection from the roots sitting in excessive dampness.

Root rot is brought on by excessive watering and inadequate drainage, and it spreads from the plant’s roots to its leaves. A fiddle leaf fig’s roots need to somewhat dry out between waterings for healthy growth. The fungal infection will eventually cause the leaves to slowly turn brown and then fall off.

Removing the pot and looking at the roots is the only way to be confident that your plant has root rot.

How can a burnt fiddle leaf fig be fixed?

Fiddle leaf fig leaves that have been burned by the sun cannot heal; they are permanently disfigured. Sunburned leaves should be removed from your plant as a treatment. If the cosmetic harm does not worry you and the sunburn spots are relatively minimal, you may choose to leave them alone.

The cosmetic damage that fiddle leaf fig sunburn results in may be the most aggravating part about it. We adore these plants for their exquisite leaves, and nobody wants a tree covered in blotchy, fading leaves.

However, there is no remedy that can make sunburned leaves heal. They will continue to be scarred until you remove them through pruning, or if you wait until they deteriorate and fall off on their own. Although a few tiny, insignificant brown or even red spots on your fiddle leaf fig are not disastrous, totally burned leaves are ugly and detrimental to the general health of your plant.

Consider removing burned leaves in stages if you don’t want to prune your fiddle leaf fig too aggressively all at once and want to preserve as much of its shape as possible. Remove two of the three leaves every several weeks. Your plant won’t appear so bare this way.

Why do the leaves of my fiddle leaf fig have brown spots?

When there is a problem, fiddle leaf figs can communicate very effectively. The most typical indications that your Fiddle Leaf needs assistance are as follows:

Brown spots are a sign that there is watering stress at play. Spots can develop as a result of excessive watering or inadequate drainage, which can also result in fungi such root rot.

Yellowing Leaves: This symptom is caused by a few different things. Yellowing leaves are typically caused by inadequate light, a lack of nutrients, excessive fertilization, and an imbalance of water. Check out our more detailed guidance on how to recognize and treat yellowing leaves if you’re not sure why your plant’s leaves are yellow and you’re not sure why.

Leaf Drop: This symptom can be caused by a variety of factors, but for Fiddle Leaf Figs, temperature and light fluctuations as well as irregular watering schedules are the main causes. Visit our page on how to prevent leaf drop to find out more about leaf drop problems with other houseplants.

What is causing my fig leaves to turn black?

My three-year-old fig tree has black blotches on its leaves, especially near the top of the tree. Is there anything I can do to deal with this and protect the tree? Thanks. Nancy Pizzo.

SUMMARY: This is fig rust, a widespread fungal disease of figs. As we get into the fall, spotting is probably going to get worse. Late summer and fall rain will accelerate the sickness, whilst dry weather will sluggish development. Eventually, the speckled leaves will fall off. Fig trees frequently succumb to this disease’s early defoliation. However, there is no reason for excessive worry or action. The trees survive the illness well, and there are no long-term health problems despite the unsightly spotting and leaf loss.

The primary crop of figs will be taken by the time this illness truly takes off in the future, when your young tree is generating healthy fruits. The next spring, your tree will generally begin to produce a lot of healthy leaves.

How frequently should fiddle leaf figs be watered?

Overwatering or failing to provide adequate drainage are the two most common ways to destroy a fiddle leaf fig. About once every 10 days or once a week, water your plant. As we just discussed, FLFs are accustomed to receiving a massive amount of water with intermittent dry spells because they are native to a rainforest-like habitat. Therefore, it’s recommended to water indoor plants until the soil is barely dripping before letting the soil dry fully in between applications.

There are two ways to accomplish this. Bring the plant inside after watering it and letting it drip for an hour or two outside or in the bathtub. Place your FLF on a plant stand above a drip tray if you don’t want to carry it back and forth to be watered. Make sure the roots don’t spend a long period sitting in extra water, whichever method you pick.

Watering a Fiddle Leaf Fig

Overwatering or failing to provide adequate drainage are the two most common ways to destroy a fiddle leaf fig. About once every 10 days or once a week, water your plant. As we just discussed, FLFs are accustomed to receiving a massive amount of water with intermittent dry spells because they are native to a rainforest-like habitat. Therefore, it’s recommended to water indoor plants until the soil is barely dripping before letting the soil dry fully in between applications. There are two ways to accomplish this. Bring the plant inside after watering it and letting it drip for an hour or two outside or in the bathtub. Place your FLF on a plant stand above a drip tray if you don’t want to carry it back and forth to be watered. Make sure the roots don’t spend a long period sitting in extra water, whichever method you pick.

Not sure of the next time to water? Simply press your finger into the soil’s top 2 inches. If it’s still wet, don’t touch it. Don’t believe in yourself? Purchase a cheap soil moisture meter, and water when it indicates that the soil is practically dry.

Having trouble deciding when to water your fiddle leaf fig? Simply press your finger into the soil’s top 2 inches. If it’s still wet, don’t touch it. Don’t believe in yourself? Purchase a cheap soil moisture meter, and water when it indicates that the soil is practically dry.

Should I prune my fiddle leaf fig’s damaged leaves?

Like grooming your dog or cat, pruning your plant is crucial to keeping it healthy and attractive. Pruning your fiddle leaf fig prevents weed growth and maintains its health. You should prune your plant for a number of reasons.

Remove Damaged Leaves and Stems

To promote the general health of your plant, you can safely remove any leaves with significant brown spots or holes. A damaged or ill leaf depletes your plant’s nutrients and increases the risk of infection. Any time of year, get rid of any leaves that are broken or ill right away.

Keep Your Plant From Getting Too Tall

Healthy fiddle leaf fig plants have a tendency to grow aggressively toward the sun, which could cause them to become too big or tall for their environment. You should cut back any growth over that height since plants look their best when their upper leaves are at least 8 to 10 inches below the ceiling. You can make your plant stronger and more compact by trimming it to prevent it from growing too tall.

Give Your Plant Balance

Your plant might grow sideways towards the direction of the closest window depending on where it receives its light, which could make it asymmetrical or unbalanced. Rotate your plant frequently so that it develops symmetrically to avoid this. Even after pruning, plants can still go out of balance, which will assist prevent uneven growth.

Decrease Crowded Areas

To stay healthy, fiddle leaf fig leaves require airflow and room. The leaves on your plant may become damaged by rubbing against one another if it becomes overly compact and crowded. Pruning will help to spread out crowded regions.

Shape Your Plant

Due to their restricted exposure to sunlight when grown indoors, fiddle leaf fig plants can develop unique morphologies. They might develop sideways rather than upwards toward the sun as they would if they were growing outside.

The lowest leaves will also fall off in the wild because of a lack of sunshine. Lower leaves, though, may still receive plenty of light inside and stay on the plant. The desired tree-like shape may be destroyed as a result. You should cut off lower leaves and branches that are spreading out too much in order to shape your plant so that it looks best in the area where it is placed.

Do I need to remove sunburned leaves?

During the recent heat wave, we were asked a lot of questions on how to revive stressed plants, and we are more than delighted to assist! To be ready for upcoming temperature extremes, consider the following frequently asked questions and their responses.

How do I help my lawn? I am watering it every day, but it’s still getting fried!

Turf grass has a very shallow root system, and at the temperatures we’ve lately had, water from the soil evaporates quickly. Despite routine watering, your lawn undoubtedly was burnt by the sun. Despite the fact that our Northwest grass blends were not developed to withstand these circumstances, if you continue to water and fertilize it regularly throughout the season, your grass should recover.

My hydrangeas are taking the worst of the heat. Any tips for recovery?

The hydrangeas really had trouble. It was excruciating to see! The majority of the plant damage may have only affected the blooms that withered or turned brown in the heat as long as the plants were kept well-watered. By cutting slightly above the leaf that is beneath the flower bud, remove spent flowers and fertilize. If the foliage on your hydrangeas is also harmed, it can have sunburn (crispy or brown around edges). Your plant will eventually recover from severe sunburn, but it might not from acute drought, depending on the total degree of damage.

My red currant has curling leaves even though it was watered deeply every day during the heat wave.

Red currant bushes prefer some shade or as least shelter from the strong sun, and they will undoubtedly display sunburn as a result of the recent weather. Remove any foliage that is more than 50% damaged and lightly fertilize it to aid in the plant’s recovery. As long as the plant did not become overly dry, the burned leaves will gradually fall off as the plant grows new ones. Spider mites are the next potential problem to keep an eye out for; the heat may have inflated the insect population, and stressed plants may be “sitting ducks for an infestation.” Due to the vulnerability of red currants to mites, keep an eye out for more yellowing or browning leaves as well as webbing on leaves and/or branches. Bring any suspicious leaves in a baggie to the garden center for diagnosis and possible treatments.

My blueberries got toasted even with daily watering. How do I care for them now?

Particularly when bearing fruit, blueberries’ thin, fibrous root structure is extremely susceptible to drying out. Your plants might not recover if they were only recently planted (less than two years in the ground). Reduce the plants’ energy needs by pruning back the plants to remove some of the top growth and by removing this year’s berry yield. Apply a thin layer of kelp meal as a top dressing, and then mulch the roots with bark, compost, etc. to stop soil from evaporating. Give the plant some time to recover while continuing to water normally. In the event that they don’t appear to be healing, assess this fall and think about planting more blueberries.

My begonias have suffered! Tips to help them recover?

Begonias are challenging in these weather! They can’t survive harsh sunlight either because they are so sensitive to rotting when they absorb too much water. To help the plant recover with less stress if they have been burnt, it is preferable to remove the blossoms and prune back the scorched leaves that appear to be more than 50% damaged. Make sure they are properly hydrated before feeding them, then give them a diluted organic liquid fertilizer. If you can, give them more cover from the sun while it’s at its hottest. Unfortunately, there is not much hope for recovery if you unintentionally overwatered them, and it might be best to replace them.

I watered the heck out of my perennial every day, but it’s still drooping. Will it get better?

The majority of the mature landscaping plants, including the most resilient lavender, were literally melting when we walked outside yesterday during the hottest portion of the day. Even if they are sufficiently hydrated, plants partially welt as a strategy to preserve water and prevent moisture loss from their leaves when exposed to harsh sun. The plants typically require no extra water after the sun has set or once they are in shade to fully recover. The lavender looked completely natural again this morning!

Two thirds of my cucumber plant is now wilted. Can I revive it?

There is still plenty of time in this growing season to replant even if two thirds of the plant is wilted or injured. Cucumbers could still be grown this year if you start your seeds in the ground!

My hibiscus was burnt to a crisp. The stems are okay, though! Is it salvageable?

Your hibiscus appears to be able to heal, but it will likely lose the majority of its damaged leaves, abort any forming flowers, and appear dejected for a while. Trim the worst-looking foliage at this time and give it some fertilizer. Continue routine watering or, if there is less foliage to maintain, perhaps water a little less frequently.

My weigela is in rough shape. It’s in a large pot and gets afternoon sun. A large tree that used to offer some shade was cut down due to ice storm damage, so the sun is relentless. Will it help if I trim off the brown stems and transplant it into the ground?

Your weigela appears to have been severely scorched and dried up. It could be better if planted in the ground, but I bet it can recover in due course. Cut it back by approximately a third now (if it hasn’t opened yet, you won’t get blooms this year), then plant it using these hot season planting methods during a cool time of the day. For the first two weeks following transplanting, provide temporary shade. Water deeply every two days for the first two weeks. Then, start to ease off by 1-2 days between waterings every week.

All new growth on my tomatoes is fried. How should I proceed?

Although we wish for a warm summer so that our tomatoes will mature, continuous temperatures exceeding 95 degrees Fahrenheit have a tendency to prevent fruit set and can even scorch growing tomatoes. On a couple of my tomato plants, especially those that have been in the ground for less than a month, I noted damage and wilting of new growth. Although I had shade fabric covering every tomato cage, the wind had blown it off of one delicate plant, which is now nearly one-third scorched. The warmest period of yesterday’s day left all of my tomato plants very wilted, but just one appears to have received lasting damage to the topmost new growth. I removed the wilted tips from my plants this morning and gave them a mild liquid kelp meal feeding, which raises potassium levels and aids in stress recovery. Your plants will recover after a few weeks if you follow suit!

My Daphne burkwoodii got sunburned leaves. Do I clip them off or let them fall off on their own?

Sunburned leaves will ultimately fall off on their own, but you can enhance the appearance of the plant by removing any leaves that have more than 50% damage. Additionally, you can assist the plant by fertilizing it to encourage a burst of new growth.

Some of my newer lupines are wilting away and flowers are getting fried. What can I do?

Your lupine plants appear to have been newly planted this year. Extreme heat and sun may be very stressful on new plantings, and when plants are in flower, the stress can be increased. Make sure not to overwater your ground plants; a thorough soak every few days is preferable to daily misting. A layer of mulch that is at least 2-3 inches thick will aid in retaining soil moisture and minimizing evaporation. It might be necessary to trim back the flower stock and a few of the crispy leaves, fertilize sparingly, and give it some time to grow again.

My new trees and perennials are still in nursery pots. Should I wait until fall to plant?

It depends on how many plants you have, how big your project area is, how much sun exposure there is, and what you have planned for the summer. Even if you decide to pot up some of the smaller plants into larger pots to keep them in containers, bear in mind that they will still require daily watering until they are planted. You might decide to start planting right away if your project area is quite modest and you can give temporary shadow protection during intense heat. Follow these hot season planting instructions carefully.

My knockout roses are fried despite watering deeply each morning during the heatwave.

Even if you gave your knockout roses good watering, they probably had never encountered temps like the ones recently and became scorched. Cut back the plant after fertilizing it to get rid of any damaged areas. Even if you severely prune it, it should recover and blossom in approximately 6 weeks, growing back better than before. You’ll still have a few months to appreciate the blossoms this year!

Should I water frequently throughout the day or only once or twice during a heatwave?

Depending on the size of the container and the amount of sun exposure, plants in pots may require more frequent watering. The optimum time to water is first thing in the morning so that plants have all their water for the day. It is preferable to give in-ground plants a thorough soaking once every few days as opposed to frequent light watering. To stop moisture evaporation from containers and other crops, mulch them.

Can I rehabilitate severe sunburn on conifers and pines (evergreens)?

Conifers and other evergreens that have been severely burned may need to be removed or replanted because they are difficult to recover from and won’t produce leaves seasonally. Depending on where the scorched region is, some gentle pruning may help remove the unsightly foliage. However, you should take care to avoid cutting into bare branches because many conifers won’t come back from such old wood.

If potted plants look completely dried out and even feel crisp, is there anything to do? I’ve been watering!

Potted plants that are entirely dried out and crispy may have either been overwatered or just gotten fried by the sun’s strength. Plants that have been exposed to the sun can be pruned and fertilized, and they should eventually recover (planting in the ground would be much better!). However, root rot frequently results in death. Keeping plants adequately hydrated while allowing the roots to sufficiently dry out for appropriate function is a tricky balance. Root rot, which eventually causes the plant to wilt or exhibit other signs of stress when the roots collapse and can no longer support growth, can develop in plants that are kept continually moist. It’s preferable to transfer containers to a shaded area or even inside if we experience this kind of intense heat again. If you are unable to move the plants, shelter them with tomato cages covered in shade cloth or plant individual pots with repurposed umbrellas affixed to bamboo stakes for daytime shade.

My nandina got a little scorched. It’s not in terrible shape, just some of its upper leaves turned brown. I thought I would just cut the brown leaves off. Any suggestions?

Just now, the nandina got sunburned. It will drop off the worst leaves in time and recover, but you can trim them off yourself if you prefer not to wait. To aid with new growth, follow up with a mild all-purpose fertilizer.

My fiddle leaf fig got too hot during a power outage! It still has a small amount of leaves.

FLF are drama queens and sensitive to temperature fluctuations. If the plant seems heavy when you pick up the pot, don’t water it; if it feels light, give it a good, deep soak. The next time it needs watering, you can give it some Joyful Dirt fertilizer and lightly spritz the foliage. My blinds and curtains are closed, so my plants have been battling for light. To assist them, I’ve added a few LED grow lights to some of the darkest rooms.