Where To Get A Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree

A fully mature fiddle leaf fig plant may cost around $200. However, you may obtain one for about $20 if you purchase a young plant.

Generally, the best approach to ensure that you are obtaining a healthy plant is to buy locally and in person. Fiddle leaf figs, once they reach maturity, can survive for up to 50 years. Therefore, if you can afford it, it is advisable to choose a healthy plant or a plant with a warranty.

Given the wide variations, cost should be taken into account when purchasing a fiddle leaf fig tree.

How To Get A Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree On A Budget

You can purchase a young plant if you wish to reduce costs without sacrificing quality. A young plant can be purchased for significantly less money even though it will take longer to reach maturity. Young plants will need a little more time and care, but you will be able to enjoy them for a longer period of time.

You might also ask a friend who has a fiddle leaf fig tree to start some seeds for you. Even though fiddle leaf figs are famously difficult to grow, it is the most affordable approach to produce a strong plant.

Check out Facebook or regional plant groups as well. Even if no one gives a free fiddle leaf fig tree, the plants given are typically more affordable and suited to your location.

Additionally, fiddle leaf fig trees do not require fertilization to survive, so you do not need to be concerned if your budget is limited. And although while they appreciate being slightly rootbound, if you are not fertilizing, you might want to think about aerating your plant once or twice a year.

What kind of plant has fiddle leaves?

A kind of tropical evergreen tree indigenous to the tropical lowlands of western Africa is the fiddle leaf fig tree, often known as the ficus lyrata tree (Sierra Leone to Cameroon). The tree form has many branches at the top but no leaves at the bottom.

What stores sell fiddle leaf figs?

  • Examine the state of the leaves. Do they have any brown patches on them?
  • Consider the size and shape of the leaves. Are they huge, bright, and powerful, or are they little, dirty, curled, or drooping?
  • Hunt for fresh growth. The perfect plant is capable of producing new leaves.
  • The new growth ought to be in good condition. A failing bud should be overlooked in favor of a fresh, cheerier-appearing new leaf.
  • Use the flashlight on your smartphone to search the cracks and crevices for microscopic bugs. Just pass it up and remember to tell the garden center if you find anything.

The first thing to understand is that each online live plant shop has a unique way of presenting their inventory.

Therefore, you are unable to predict how far a knife will penetrate before coming into contact with live tissue. A razor-sharp knife is therefore very necessary. Simply using the least amount of pressure is ensured, lowering the possibility of a mistake.

A layer of bubble wrap serves as protection for my first fiddle leaf fig package. Despite popular belief, this is not only a better practice than the norm. And I appreciate that added measure of security.

The soil is then covered with masking tape so that when I tip them upside down, no dirt spills out. It’s just clever.

I paid between $4 and $5 for each of the tiny, immature fiddle leaf figs I ordered, each of which is around 2 inches tall. They will treat me nicely in the future if I treat them good now. I’m eager to provide them with the greatest care I can.

I have to approach unboxing a more mature two-footer plant differently.

Once more, having a sharp knife is essential. I can’t get my arms far enough into the box to reach that pot and pull it out since the packing is so tight. Instead of reaching down to lift the pot and the plant out, you will need to cut away the box.

I lightly press down one corner’s side with the tip of my X-Acto knife. Just to the pot, not all the way to the bottom. I can now open one side of it like a door. You can now remove the pot from the box.

I weigh it when I remove it from the packaging to gauge how saturated the soil might be. I had noticed a few little brown stains on those upper leaves. I’ll startle them in a moment to see whether they move. Since they are likely spider mites if they do.

Compared to the little babies, this plant’s evaluation is something I take very seriously. That’s not just because it costs five or six times as much, but also because there is a lot more foliage at this point to look for signs of issues.

Don’t be startled if loose dirt falls across your work surface as you remove the tape and paper. When you discover that there are no overt indicators of suffering, this is always a thrilling discovery.

You don’t need to use the stick to support the plant if it can stand upright on its own with a little pressure applied to the trunk. In fact, if you allow the trunk to rely too on that stick, you risk weakening it.

Test your plant’s ability to return to an upright position by giving it a little wiggle. I’ve been happy with the size of fiddle leaf figs I’ve been getting from online vendors. The more experienced ones are the ones that have caused me problems.

I was initially impressed by what I saw: a phenomenally robust, massive trunk, and few, if any, curled, dried, or brown-spotted leaves.

Along with the tree, a few insects that resembled fruit flies appeared. That indicates fungus gnats. I unwrapped the plant and started root-to-top inspection.

Experience has taught me that the top two inches of soil are home to white fly larvae. However, because they are minute, I knew that if there was a problem, I would only be able to see the adult fungus gnats. And I did see them.

The roots are protruding from the top of this dirt, and I can see them as I proceed up in my strategic inspection.

This is a sign that it’s time to repot other houseplants. However, our ficus lyrata rolls in this direction of its own accord. Thus, for this particular plant, you don’t need to be concerned with exposed top roots.

Then, once more, I see a big, sturdy trunk. Excellent. You might be wondering why the last plant I unboxed resembled a bush, but this trunk is naked. This one resembles a tree more.

Again, you’ll need to read another piece on our website titled Pruning and Shaping Your Fiddle Leaf Fig Plant to Keep it Healthy to find the simple solution. Your favorite plant will grow from a bushy shrub into a towering tree as described in that useful article, which will also teach you what to expect at different ages and stages.

It’s time for me to look at the vegetation right now. One thing I notice is a little hole that appears to be an injury in one of the leaves. Therefore, it is not an insect’s lunch. It won’t fix itself, but it also won’t become any bigger.

I’ll now set the plant down here so I can study the top leaves. And once more, I’m happy to see some new growth, which is the telltale sign of a healthy plant.

As I adapt the plant to its new environment, I rely on this clue to provide me comfort if the plant experiences shock. The nicest feature of this new development is that it is distinguished by large, fresh leaves rather than by little, underdeveloped, or reluctant little shoots. They merely boost my self-assurance as a caretaker.

The last thing I notice is the abundance of loose dirt. Many of the leaves and branches are being covered by it. So all this plant needs is a bath. I use 75-degree water because I want to emulate the tree’s native tropical West Africa, and I hope the tree will appreciate my thoughtful gestures like this while it adjusts to its new existence here with me.

We appreciate you learning more about the best ways to buy a fiddle leaf fig from a store or online. Make sure you know how to care for your plant after you bring it home. Happy expanding!

Best places to find fiddle leaf figs to grow

Care for Fiddle-Leaf Fig. These plants are indigenous to tropical regions of Africa, where they may flourish in extremely hot and humid environments. The home grower will certainly find it difficult to replicate these humid conditions, making them fairly difficult.

Fiddle leaf figs survive for how long?

A tropical tree with fiddle-shaped leaves, the ficus lyrata is a native of the lowland rainforests of West Africa. It has a lifespan of 25 to 50 years (if cared for properly in non-tropical conditions).

What makes it so well-liked in the design community? Most people give the tree’s large, floppy spherical leaves, which resemble violins, credit. People anthropomorphize the plant by comparing these to babies’ huge eyes in an effort to make them desire to care for it.

Of course, the majority of designers would also mention how photogenic the plant is, which undoubtedly helps.

Are fiddle leaf figs an air purifier?

Ficus lyrata, sometimes known as fiddle leaf or simply “Fiddleleaf” figs, have been experiencing a surge in popularity that shows no signs of abating. Why? They feature enormous, showy leaves that are fashioned like a violin, are relatively minimal maintenance (see our specific advice below), and have an assertive, architectural growth habit. What’s best? They rank among the greatest indoor plants for air purification, and the bigger they get, the better they do it.

Can dogs eat fig trees?

Fig plants come in a variety of sizes and shapes and are distinguished by their shiny, rubbery leaves. Due to their simplicity of maintenance, these plants are popular indoor plants. This plant is also known as a rubber plant or rubber tree due to the characteristics of its leaves, and the genus Fig has a wide range of closely related plants and trees. In actuality, the genus has about 850 different species of trees, vines, and plants.

Originating in India, Malaysia, and Southeast Asia are the fig plants or trees. Fig plants thrive in warm weather because their natural habitats are tropical regions. Contrarily, the fig does not thrive in cold climates, despite doing well in warm climates. Although they are common houseplants, fig plants can be harmful to dogs. Dogs who consume or come into contact with the sap from fig leaves may have severe skin irritation. Dogs that consume any part of this well-known plant’s figs may become ill.

If you have dogs or other small animals in your home, it’s crucial to keep all fig plants outside. Many dogs, particularly puppies, like exploring and chewing on strange objects. By being proactive with regard to the plants in your home, this can be prevented, which could result in a lot of illness and a hospital trip.

Dogs eating the fig, or ficus, plant causes canine fig poisoning. Ficin, a sap-like toxin found in fig plants, is poisonous to dogs when swallowed or when it comes into contact with their skin, eyes, or mouth.

Does the fiddle leaf fig poison dogs?

You want to liven up your home and demonstrate to your pals that you are “hip to the newest interior design trends (hint: indoor rainforests are trendy)” so you want to add some greenery. Before you buy that fancy fiddle leaf fig, huge cactus, or cut-leaf philodendron at the neighborhood nursery, keep in mind that your cat or dog will also be residing with and probably attempting to consume your newest plant-child. We conducted research to assist you in making plant selections that are secure for your pet family members!

Unexpectedly, some of the most common and accessible house plants are harmful to your dogs. Among many other plants, this list includes ficus, snake plant (mother-in-tongue), law’s philodendron, and the majority of cacti.

The most common offenders when it comes to chewing on indoor plants are cats. But pets are also in danger. Dogs can be poisoned by many of the same plants that can harm your cat. In addition, there is a chance that dogs will dig up and consume potentially harmful horticultural bulbs.

If consumed by cats or dogs, aloe vera is toxic and can result in vomiting, diarrhea, depression, and tremors.

Mother-in-Tongue law’s (Snake Plant)

If consumed by cats or dogs, it is toxic and can result in diarrhea, vomiting, and nausea.

Philodendron

If consumed by cats or dogs, this substance is toxic and can cause oral irritation, pain and swelling of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive drooling, and trouble swallowing.

Anguished Fig Tree

Toxic to cats and dogs; when consumed, it can result in oral irritation, excessive drooling, and vomiting as well as dermatitis when the plant is in touch with the animal’s skin.

Fig, Fiddle Leaf

If consumed by cats or dogs, this substance is toxic and can cause vomiting, excessive drooling, and oral irritation.

LiliesThe majority of lily cultivars are hazardous to your pet. A freshly cut spring bouquet on your dining table may be lovely, but your cat or dog can view it more as a meal than a decorative item. For your pets, even a small nibble of the leaves or blossoms or a smell of the pollen from some types can be lethal.

Even though some lily kinds, like Peace and Calla, are not fatal to animals, they can nevertheless produce mild to severe poisoning symptoms in your cat. Excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing, pawing at the mouth, loss of appetite, and mouth irritation are among the symptoms.

Easter, Tiger, Day, Japanese, and Stargazer lilies are examples of lilies that can cause renal failure. Vomiting, loss of appetite, excessive drooling, lethargy, dehydration, increased or decreased thirst and urination, stomach discomfort, and kidney failure are all symptoms of poisoning.

Get your pet to a veterinarian right once for treatment if you believe they may have ingested some harmful plant material or if you observe these symptoms in them.

What is a pet and plant lover to do then? There are several animal-safe plants available that can give your decor that contemporary, lush jungle feel!

Here are a few nice illustrations:

Majesty PalmA sizable indoor palm that prefers moist soil and 6 to 8 hours of bright light.

Fern in maidenhair

It needs consistent hydration (not sloppy dampness) and oblique morning or afternoon light to grow because it is delicate and picky.

Spider Plant is versatile and simple to grow. Your spider plant will thrive if you give it well-drained soil and bright indirect light.

Orchids

For an orchid to bloom, strong, indirect light, high humidity, airflow around the roots, and alternating periods of drying soil and heavy watering are desired. This varies based on the type.

Ferns, Staghorn

usually fixed on a piece of wood to allow air to circulate around the roots. This epiphyte benefits from humidity, bright indirect light, and consistent, but not soggy, wetness.

BambooA fast-growing plant, bamboo prefers moist soil with good drainage, lots of water, and five hours of direct sunlight each day.

Cast Iron Works

This plant, a member of the lily family, is not harmful to your pet. Maintain consistent soil moisture and expose it to bright to semi-bright light. It dislikes exposure to direct sunshine.

BromeliadAn ancestor of the pineapple, bromeliads appreciate monthly irrigation and bright, indirect light.

Perhaps you already have some of the listed hazardous plants, and your dogs get along just fine. Or perhaps, despite your pets’ interest, you lack the heart to give away your collection of cacti. Growing pet grass is one method for diverting your pets’ attention away from any potential threat. Once it has grown, put the grass next to your pet’s bowl to reward good behavior. The idea behind a pet herb garden is that some animals will intuitively consume plants that have medical benefits, such as peppermint to calm an upset stomach.

Another choice is to purchase a plant spray that is suitable for pets and has a harsh taste to discourage nibbling.