What Time Of Year To Repot Fiddle Leaf Fig

Every two years, fiddle leaf figs typically require repotting, and spring is an excellent time to do it because the weather can help your tree recover from any root shock.

Additionally, the warmer weather makes it possible to repot your fiddle outside, which is advantageous if your tree is big.

Find a pot with drainage that is 1-2 times larger than your fiddle’s root ball if it is time for an upgrade (but no larger). Use a quick-draining soil, such as our Premium Fiddle Leaf Fig Soil or cactus mix.

After repotting your fiddle, the roots are particularly fragile, so wait a month before fertilizing. Chemical burns on your roots or leaves are not what you want!

Prune

Now is a wonderful time to prune your fiddle’s leaves if they are getting crowded or if the lower leaves are drooping.

To get rid of those leaves, just use a clean, sharp knife or a set of pruning shears. To prevent shock, be careful not to remove more than 10% of your fiddle’s leaves at once.

Bonus advice: You can reproduce any healthy branches or leaves that you prune! To encourage root growth, dip the cut end in some rooting hormone and place it in a glass of water. When the roots are one length, place in soil and change the water every day.

Clean your fiddle’s leaves

You should consider doing some spring cleaning on your instrument. It’s crucial to maintain the leaves of your plant clean because dust and grime can clog pores and hinder photosynthesis and respiration in addition to making them look ugly.

Use a hose, shower your plant, or mist it with warm water in a spray bottle to clean it. Then, gently wipe the leaves with a towel.

We advise using our Leaf Amor spray, which assists with leaf cleaning and also shields leaves against dust, dirt, bacteria, and fungus.

Adjust your watering routine

With the weather getting warmer, you may have become used to watering your instrument less frequently than you formerly did throughout the winter when it was chilly.

Observe the root ball of your plant using a moisture meter, and record how long it takes the soil to dry out. As the temps rise, you might notice that your plant needs a little bit more water.

Fertilize

Now is a wonderful time to start fertilizing your fiddle leaf fig if you haven’t already.

Like a multivitamin for your plant, fertilizer gives it the nutrients it needs to encourage the growth of its stems and leaves as well as give it a gorgeous, glossy green hue.

Find a 3-1-2 NPK liquid fertilizer, and make sure you follow the instructions on the bottle. Carefully adhere to the suggested fertilizer plan. I use Fiddle Leaf Fig Food since I can never remember to fertilize on a schedule, and it’s gentle enough to use with every watering. Every time I water my fiddles, I simply add a little to my watering can, and my plants absolutely adore it!

Adjust your light

Keep an eye on the type of light your fiddle is receiving because the angle of the sun’s rays changes in the spring. If the sun is now shining directly on your plant’s leaves, you may want to move it a few inches to avoid direct sunlight that could scorch your plant.

Branch out

You should foster the growth of new branches on your fiddle during the spring. Try pinching or notching your fiddle if you want new branches.

Try pinching if you want the tree to sprout branches from the top: Get some pruning shears, look for the top of the tree’s freshest growth, and cut it off. (Beware of the sap!) Within two to three weeks, new branches ought to start to form.

Try notching if you want your tree to branch deeper down the trunk: decide where you want a branch to go, identify the closest node, then make a 1/8 cut in the trunk with a sharp knife. With a towel, remove the sap.

Although notching has a roughly 50/50 success rate, if it does, you’ll soon notice new branch buds!

A caveat: don’t make too many changes at once.

The spring is a great time to increase Fiddle Leaf Fig maintenance and benefit from growth spurts, but keep in mind that fiddles don’t appreciate too much change at once. Don’t repot, prune, notch, and fertilize all in the same day, to put it another way.

To give your tree time to heal, space large procedures like this out by at least a few weeks. And keep in mind to start with the fundamentals: light, water, fertilizer, and climate.

When should a violin be repotted, exactly?

Floppy Leaf Only when they are root-bound do figs require an increase in pot size. In their containers, these plants typically prefer to be tight. Therefore, you should only repot a plant after you observe roots encircling the pot’s outside edge, masses of roots visible on the surface, or roots protruding from the pot’s bottom.

Holding onto the plant’s base or trunk, you can confirm this by gently wiggling and removing the plant out of the pot. The plant should come out of the pot pretty easily, and you can count the roots you can see to determine whether or not they are root bound (many roots going horizontally around the pot).

Every two to three years, you should repot your plant with new soil even if it isn’t root-bound. By doing this, the plant will be able to absorb new nutrients from the new soil. Instead of increasing the pot size, simply utilize the same pot to do this.

Before replanting with new soil, the dirt should be gently broken up and as much old soil as possible should be shaken off the roots.

Don’t wait to repot your new plant.

Your plant most likely arrived in a plastic pot if you bought it from Home Depot or another supplier.

To keep the roots bone-dry, these pots incorporate drainage holes on the side. That’s because growers regularly moisten plants’ roots with water, and growing containers are made to allow water to drain quickly. This lessens (or completely eliminates) the chance of root rot, but once you get your plant home, it becomes hazardous.

Don’t put off repotting your plant because fiddle leaf figs can dry out and sustain severe harm in just a few days in these containers. If you have to wait a few days or weeks, make sure to water your plant every day while it is in the grower’s pot. Pour the water on the plant gently so it has time to soak in rather than simply draining out the side drainage holes.

Understand proper drainage.

Understanding correct drainage is the most crucial long-term investment you can make in the health of your fiddle leaf fig plant.

Because fiddle leaf fig trees are prone to root rot, you must ensure that your container has excellent drainage and that your plant never sits in water. To keep your root ball dry, you’ll need a container with a drainage hole and some cactus mix or other materials, such Smart Gravel.

My preferred planters are those made of ceramic with drainage holes, such as this one or the following one, both of which are available at Home Depot.

Select the right container.

You’ll need to purchase a new container that is 3–4 inches wider in diameter (across the top) than the one your plant is now in. Grab a tape measure to make sure your new container is bigger than your old one in both width and height. Avoid going overboard because oversized pots might encourage root rot. The new pot should have a maximum diameter increase of 6 inches over the old one. A 16- or 18-inch pot will work as the majority of the large fiddle leaf fig trees at Home Depot are in 12- or 14-inch pots. Your new pot must have drainage holes at the bottom, otherwise, plant homicide will have occurred. A sizable ceramic pot like the one below works best for me as a container.

Get the right potting soil.

Your plant needs nutrients from the soil in order to grow, as well as for proper drainage and moisture management.

I always plant fiddle leaf figs in our premium potting soil. Don’t give in to the temptation of using soil or dirt from your garden for succulents or other plants. Houseplants require soil that is prepared to promote airflow and water retention.

Can Fiddle Leaf Figs be repotted in the summer?

Occasionally, but yes. Every one to three years, ideally in the spring or summer, your FLF should be repotted.

It should be 2-4 inches larger in the new container than it is in the current one. Never go too big; keep in mind that they prefer a snug fit.

You should transplant in a pot with drainage holes for the best results. Because FLFs dislike having their feet wet, drainage holes are essential to avoid root rot.

Leo has been around for three years, so an upgrade to a larger pot was clearly in order. He has resided in an 8 “His roots and pot were beginning to emerge.

I chose a great 10 “pot for him to allow him some, but not too much, room to spread out. I chose something affordable because my pot is sitting in a pretty basket with a plant saucer at the bottom.

Are fiddle leaf figs root bound in their favor?

Fiddle leaf figs thrive well in the pot they were purchased in and are generally content as root-bound plants. Place it into a larger decorative container or basket and cover the plastic store-bought pot with some beautiful moss. We’ll discuss more about repotting later.