How To Take Care Of My Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree

Fiddle Leaf Figs need to be thoroughly watered about once a week to match their love of natural light. You should modify the amount of watering based on the size of the plant and, consequently, the size of the roots. As a general rule, water the plant thoroughly only after the top 2 to 3 inches of soil have dried up. This entails watering it till water drips out the bottom if it’s in a planter with a drainage hole. However, avoid letting the drip tray fill up with water for too long because root rot can readily develop in this situation. Remember to water the plant slowly and in a circular motion around it, making sure to wet all of the soil. Water will then reach all of the roots rather than just some.

A Sustee Aqua-meter is one of the greatest instruments for determining how frequently your Fiddle Leaf Fig requires water (available for purchase in our shops). We have discovered that there are particular seasons of the year when our plants are significantly more thirsty than usual since we started using these in our stores. The Sustee changes color from blue to white when the soil is sufficiently dry to prevent overwatering from occurring after it has become saturated with water.

You should water all tropical plants with water that is room temperature. A plant will undoubtedly experience shock if exposed to hot or extremely cold water, just as it would if the same conditions existed outside.

Prior to watering, aerate and break up the soil to improve water absorption. In order to ensure that water reaches all of the plant’s roots rather than draining out along the planter’s edges, we also advise watering very slowly around the top of the soil.

Maintenance

Fiddle Leaf Figs need some routine care, just like most other plants. One crucial maintenance procedure for your fiddle leaf coincidentally involves its leaves, which are also its most noticeable feature. Wonderful duty in the shape of routine dusting comes with great leaves. Fiddle Leaf Figs require frequent dusting due to the size of their leaves. As dust builds up on plant leaves, dust particles interfere with the plant’s ability to absorb sunlight and carry out photosynthesis. Given how much Fiddle Leaf Figs adore light, giving your plant a frequent dusting will go a long way toward keeping it healthy.

Rotating your plant monthly or biweekly is a good idea in addition to dusting the leaves. By rotating your plant, you’ll ensure that it receives an equal distribution of light, preventing one side from growing much faster than the other and resulting in a solid, symmetrical Fiddle Leaf Fig.

There are a few things you can do to encourage your Fiddle Leaf Fig (or any tree, for that matter) to start developing branches. First, try providing your plant with additional light. Trees naturally sprout branches, and if they have a lot of natural light, they may have more energy to devote to doing so. Cutting off your plant’s highest point of growth is another approach to promote branching. As a result, the plant will be forced to start branching out from the sides rather than continuing to grow vertically. Visit our pruning journal entry to find out more about pruning and branching.

Aerating the soil once every few months prevents the soil from being compacted for people who don’t already do so. The ability of your plant to absorb water is one of many factors that can be badly impacted by compacted soil, which eventually forms tiny pockets of soil where water never penetrates. It is possible to aerate using a variety of tools, including chopsticks and official soil aerators that are of a similar size and shape. To avoid destroying too many roots, gently press the aerator deeper into the earth as you go. By breaking up any areas where the soil has clumped together, do this a variety of times around the soil to keep your plant healthy and happy.

Last but not least, we advise using a “less is more” philosophy when it comes to fertilizing your Fiddle Leaf Fig and other indoor plants. It’s advisable to avoid providing your plants with too many extra nutrients at once. In the spring and summer, we strongly advise adding a slow release pellet fertilizer, such as the Osmocote Plus Indoor Smart-Release Plant Food, into the top layer of the plant’s soil. These pellet fertilizers typically last for a few months.

Winter Tips

Winter is a challenging season for indoor plants, including Fiddle Leaf Figs, because of the obvious lack of natural light and the cooler temperatures. As indicated above, keeping an eye out for cold windows is a smart place to start, but there are other things you can do to keep your Fiddle Leaf content throughout the chilly months.

People frequently experience problems with heating vents during the winter, but since they aren’t used for more than half the year, it’s simple to forget about them. Plan to relocate all of your plants away from any heating vents when it is time for them to turn on. Repeated hot air bursts have the potential to scorch leaves and quickly dry out your plants.

Break up the dirt a little with your fingertips before watering your plant in the winter. Soil is easily clumped and compacted in winter due to the dry indoor air. By lightly breaking it up with your fingertips, you can prevent water from dripping through the soil and out the sides of the planter.

It’s also important to note that a humidifier can benefit Fiddle Leaf Figs and other tropical plants all year long, but particularly during the winter when the indoor air turns dry. Your plants are able to flourish as they would in a rainforest thanks to the continuous increase in moisture circulating in the air, which prevents browning leaf tips.

Key points:

Fiddle Leaf Figs thrive when put immediately in front of windows since they require a lot of natural light.

Once a week, thoroughly water the soil, allowing the top few inches to dry out before watering again.

Please feel free to ask any questions you may have about caring for fiddle leaf figs below, in person at one of our stores, or by contacting us.

How is a fiddle leaf fig plant cared for indoors?

PRO TIP: Rinse the leaves of your plant with room temperature water every three months. This makes sure they can absorb and photosynthesize sunlight more effectively by clearing away any dust that has accumulated.

Always evaluate your plant’s watering requirements as soon as you get one. It is important to check the soil’s moisture content first to make sure it isn’t wet directly under the surface before giving your plant a drink. Additionally, think about aerating your plant’s soil before to the first watering. Aerating can help with drainage, let the soil breathe, and let moisture escape because many farmers compact the soil to prevent it from shifting while being transported.

As it originates from a region of the world where it gets extremely dry in between rainstorms, the fiddle leaf fig like its soil to be kept continuously, uniformly moist with a brief drying out interval between waterings. When the top two inches of soil have dried, thoroughly water the plant. Check the soil frequently until you establish a habit with your plant. If you allow the soil to dry deeply to the lower root system, leaf loss will result. On the other hand, excessive soil moisture can induce leaf drop and root rot.

A soil probe, which enables you to check your plant’s moisture level at the root level and may also be used to aerate the soil if ever overwatered, is the finest method we have found to obtain an accurate moisture reading throughout the soil. Choosing our Monitor Brass Soil Probe is a classy move.

We strongly advise potting your fiddle leaf because it is difficult to keep it alive for a long time in its nursery container. Just be sure to use a permanent planter with sufficient of soil mass and, most importantly, drainage. You must be extremely careful not to overwater your Fiddle Leaf Fig if it was planted in a container without a drainage hole. In this situation, we advise giving your Fiddle Leaf Fig a little extra time to dry out in between waterings and checking the soil’s moisture content at the roots with a soil probe before watering. Particularly in our self-watering containers, these plants thrive!

How often should fiddle leaf figs be watered?

Overwatering or failing to provide adequate drainage are the two most common ways to destroy a fiddle leaf fig. About once every 10 days or once a week, water your plant. As we just discussed, FLFs are accustomed to receiving a massive amount of water with intermittent dry spells because they are native to a rainforest-like habitat. Therefore, it’s recommended to water indoor plants until the soil is barely dripping before letting the soil dry fully in between applications.

There are two ways to accomplish this. Bring the plant inside after watering it and letting it drip for an hour or two outside or in the bathtub. Place your FLF on a plant stand above a drip tray if you don’t want to carry it back and forth to be watered. Make sure the roots don’t spend a long period sitting in extra water, whichever method you pick.

Watering a Fiddle Leaf Fig

Overwatering or failing to provide adequate drainage are the two most common ways to destroy a fiddle leaf fig. About once every 10 days or once a week, water your plant. As we just discussed, FLFs are accustomed to receiving a massive amount of water with intermittent dry spells because they are native to a rainforest-like habitat. Therefore, it’s recommended to water indoor plants until the soil is barely dripping before letting the soil dry fully in between applications. There are two ways to accomplish this. Bring the plant inside after watering it and letting it drip for an hour or two outside or in the bathtub. Place your FLF on a plant stand above a drip tray if you don’t want to carry it back and forth to be watered. Make sure the roots don’t spend a long period sitting in extra water, whichever method you pick.

Not sure of the next time to water? Simply press your finger into the soil’s top 2 inches. If it’s still wet, don’t touch it. Don’t believe in yourself? Purchase a cheap soil moisture meter, and water when it indicates that the soil is practically dry.

Having trouble deciding when to water your fiddle leaf fig? Simply press your finger into the soil’s top 2 inches. If it’s still wet, don’t touch it. Don’t believe in yourself? Purchase a cheap soil moisture meter, and water when it indicates that the soil is practically dry.

Do fiddle leaf fig trees require much maintenance?

Fiddle leaf figs have a reputation for needing particular handling. Nevertheless, taking care of your own tree isn’t as difficult as some might believe! Check out our fiddle leaf fig care advice to become the most hip plant parent around.

Light: A lot of bright, filtered light is preferred by fiddle leaf figs. To ensure that your fiddle leaf fig receives plenty of sunlight throughout the day, place it close to a bright, east-facing window.

When you see your fiddle leaf fig plant straining for the light, rotate it every few months for the best fiddle leaf fig care. To maintain your fiddle leaf fig tree’s leaves clean and to aid the plant in effectively absorbing more sunshine, wipe them off once a week. This is crucial for this plant in particular because of its huge, dust-prone leaves.

Water: Before you take up your watering can, let the top inch of the soil around your fiddle leaf fig tree dry off. Water should be lukewarm or at room temperature because cold water might shock plants. Although they prefer thorough watering, fiddle leaf figs do not like to sit in water. Allow the water to completely drain out of the bottom of the pot and make sure the saucer or tray is dry to avoid this. Fiddle leaf fig watering can be a little challenging at initially, but if you become familiar with its watering warning signs, you can avoid watering problems.

The leaves of a submerged fiddle leaf fig will droop and turn brown around the edges. A fiddle leaf fig that has received too much water will have dark brown patches and edges on its leaves in addition to an unpleasant odor that lingers close to the earth. These watering errors can be fixed by either watering less or, if it has been overwatered, by repotting in new soil. If it’s submerged, you could water it more. Any irrigation errors should be fixed right away because unattended issues might lead to holey leaves!

The big leaves of fiddle leaf figs need nutrient-rich soil to survive. To maintain leaves lush and lively, occasionally add some homemade plant food to the soil to replenish the earth’s nutrients.

Temperature: Similar to the environment of their native rain forests, these plants favor warm, muggy temperatures. Keep your fiddle leaf figs in environments that are 65 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit. They won’t survive in a space with a temperature below 50°F without developing brown blotches. You can place additional plants close by or place the plant on top of a tray of gravel to boost humidity.

Additionally vulnerable to drafts are fiddle leaf figs. Place them safely away from air conditioning units and other draft sources, and keep the surrounding windows tightly closed. Their leaves may dry out from excessive exposure and fall off. Additionally, you should avoid moving them unless it is absolutely necessary because any abrupt adjustments may also cause their leaves to fall.

Toxicity: Fiddle leaf fig trees can upset your pets’ stomachs if they consume them. Put your trees up high or somewhere your dogs can’t climb to get to them to keep them out of the way. For further information, see our list of dangerous plants.

Pests: Mealy bugs, aphids, mites, and scales are common on fiddle leaf figs. Look for any unusual growths or holes in their leaves, and inspect the underside for any little bugs. If you come across any of these undesirable creatures, remove them with a hot, soapy cloth or a light insecticide.

Care for fiddle leaf figs can be challenging because some issues escalate fast if ignored.

One of the most frequent problems your fiddle leaf fig may experience is the emergence of brown spots or edges. As we have discussed, there are several problems that this discoloration could mean. If your tree has brown borders or brown spots, it may be overwatered or underwatered. If you feel the soil is excessively dry or wet, change your watering schedule.

Brown spots may also be a sign that the temperature is too chilly or that the plant is receiving too much sun. In this situation, you should check your home’s temperature and, if necessary, raise it to a comfortable level. If the weather is suitable, put some curtains to the light fixture for your fiddle leaf fig to shield the plant from direct sunlight. See all of the solutions we offer in our guide to plant resurrection to address these various problems.

Make sure your fiddle leaf fig is content and healthy by keeping a close check on it. To avoid future problems that are not essential, address any issues right away.

When the roots of your fiddle leaf fig tree begin to protrude from the bottom of its container, it is time to repot it. You can either cut the root ball or repot it in a little bigger pot. If you decide to repot your tree, check at our in-depth advice in our plant repotting guide.

On the other hand, if you want to maintain the size of your fiddle leaf fig, trimming the root ball is a good substitute. Be careful not to damage its root system by trimming more than 20% of the plant’s roots.

Finding a healthy branch with a few healthy leaves is the first step in propagation. Cut directly above the point where your desired leaf joins the tree (known as the node). After that, submerge your branch in filtered water and place it in a bright area. When the water appears cloudy or unclean, replace it. Your cutting should start to grow roots after a month. When the roots are a few inches long, pot your clipping.

Pruning: Your fiddle leaf fig will grow more quickly if a few of its leaves are periodically pruned back. In order for your plant to concentrate on giving nutrients for its healthy leaves, start by cutting back any damaged leaves. Additionally, since fiddle leaf fig trees require breathing room for proper growth, remove any branches that cross other branches. The tree can also be pruned if you’d like it to have a particular shape or height.

Make your cuts at least an inch away from the trunk while pruning your tree to avoid damaging the main trunk. If your fiddle leaf fig is healthy, your cuttings will grow two branches. Establish a routine of pruning your tree whenever you see any overgrowth to keep it healthy and robust!

Although taking care of fiddle leaf figs is not the easiest task in the world, you will undoubtedly achieve plant parent status with this fussy plant! You’ll feel accomplished and your home will look better with a thriving fiddle leaf, which will also impress any visitors. The additional care required for these lovely houseplants is worth it!