How To Grow A Tall Fiddle Leaf Fig

  • OPTIMIZE THE POT SIZE AS THE FIRST STEP.
  • Ensure excellent drainage in step two.
  • Step 3: COMPLETE, REGULAR WASHING.
  • Check for healthy soil aeration in step four.
  • Do an annual soil treatment in step five.
  • Step 6 is to fertilize less frequently.
  • STEP 7: TURN ON THE LIGHTS!

How much time does it take a fiddle leaf fig to reach its full height?

This West African native plant is planted inside because of its lovely semi-lobed and oval leaves, which all appear to develop to different proportions. This plant was given the name fiddle because of the fiddle-like (violin-shaped) shape of its leaves.

Although it may take this ficus up to 10–15 years to achieve full maturity, after 3–4 years of growth, it begins to resemble a beautiful tree or other ornamental house plant.

Trunk and leaves: As you can see from the picture on the left, the leaves have pronounced veins running through the middle and from the center to the edge. These lustrous leaves can reach a length of 12 inches and a width of at least 5 inches. Although sturdy, the trunk is rather peculiar and grows quite long and thin, giving the plant a bushy appearance at the top without lower leaves.

Displaying: Because they prefer bright lighting, they thrive in greenhouses and conservatories. Although sufficient light must be provided – wherever they are sitting – they are the kind of plant that looks wonderful near doorways, corridors, fireplaces, and other prominent sections of a room.

Flowering: Fiddle leaf plants will develop flowers and eventually fruits in their natural habitat and outside, but this rarely occurs indoors.

Care level: This ficus seems to require a little more attention than the rubber plant, F. elastica, primarily because of its demand for light and sensitivity to losing leaves. Overwater is the worst thing to do. Additionally, excessive soil drying and low humidity levels will render leaves dark and unsightly. The majority of growers will be alright because it’s not nearly a novice plant and doesn’t require an expert.

Do fiddle leaf fig plants elicit more height?

placing a fiddle leaf fig tree in a large, contemporary container. Garden tools, dirt, and a container of Ficus lyrata on a hardwood floor. New house tree planting procedure

Fiddle Leaf Fig 10106:21

The fiddle leaf fig, which has been a popular houseplant recently, adds a stunning architectural element to any room in the house. Although this lush plant is beautiful and has shiny, violin-shaped leaves, it can be challenging to maintain. But don’t worry—we have advice to maintain it flourishing in your area.

The good news is that the fiddle leaf fig (Ficus lyrata), if acclimated, can grow to be at least 6 feet tall, making it an impressive statement piece. If you want a different look, there are also various cultivars of the plant, such “Suncoast” and “Compacta,” that don’t grow as tall and are bushier.

So, before taking one of these not-so-cheap houseplants home, read our in-depth care instructions and essential information if you want to get the most out of your investment for years to come.

How do you handle a fiddle leaf fig that has grown tall?

Cutting back fiddle leaf figs is actually extremely simple, despite the fact that the concept of it may be scary.

When trimming down fiddle leaf figs, be prepared. You should cut your plant with neat, precise cuts. Only a clean, well-kept set of pruning shears can accomplish this; not a pair of worn-out scissors. It’s also advised to cover the area surrounding your fiddle leaf fig with a drop cloth when you prune it because any cuts could drip sticky sap onto your floors, and nobody likes that.

If you feel so inclined, think about keeping the healthy trimmings and replanting them as fiddle leaf fig plants by rerooting them in a jar of water. Within 1-2 months, your cuttings should form healthy root systems; at this stage, you can plant them in little pots.

Your particular preferences will determine how you prune fiddle leaf figs. dislike the appearance of sick branches or shredded, burned leaves? Simply use your pruning shears to remove any of these eyesores. The stems or trunks of fiddle leaf figs can be either naked or covered in leaves. If you want your fiddle leaf fig to look more like a tree, you should remove the older lower leaves from the trunk, assuming your plant is still growing well on top.

Do you like how tall your fiddle leaf fig is right now? Your primary stem has a developing tip at the top where new leaves will eventually appear. You will need to use your fingers to pinch out these young leaves as they emerge in order to control the height of your plant. Additionally, it might prevent lower leaf loss and promote branching of your plant close to the pinch spots.

Is your fiddle leaf fig plant lanky or excessively tall? Make a cut just above one of the main stem’s nodes at the required height by inspecting the nodes (a node is the location where a leaf joins a branch). For any horizontal or outward branches that may be too lengthy for your taste, repeat this procedure. Below the areas where you were trimming back fiddle leaf figs, new growth can sprout.

How come my fiddle leaves won’t become tall?

Because it is expertly prepared with the ideal N-P-K ratio for fiddle leaf figs, we adore Fiddle Leaf Fig Plant Food. The best aspect is that it is so mild you can incorporate it into your weekly watering schedule! In this manner, you can guarantee that your tree receives the ideal dosage each time and that you never have to remember a fertilizer plan.

Repot your fiddle.

Fiddle leaf figs frequently have limited growth as a result of outgrowing their pot or becoming root-bound.

This occurs when the roots encircle themselves so tightly that they are unable to branch out or absorb the nutrients or water needed to maintain growth.

It’s usually time to repot your plant if you see a bunch of roots poking out of the top of the soil or the bottom of the pot. Since most fiddle leaf figs require repotting every two to three years, you should consider doing so if you haven’t done so already.

Although repotting seems frightening, it need not be. You can learn everything you need to know about repotting your fiddle leaf fig from this article. The top 4 inches of soil can be removed and replaced with new soil if your fiddle leaf fig is too large to be repotted.

Your fiddle leaf fig can develop and thrive after the appropriate watering schedule, nutrients, and pot size are in place because environment is important for a healthy plant (indoors or outdoors)!

How can I quicken the growth of fiddle leaves?

How to Grow Your Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree Bigger and Quicker in 7 Easy Steps!

  • OPTIMIZE THE POT SIZE IN STEP 1.
  • Step 2: GUARANTEE OUTSTANDING DRAINAGE.
  • 3rd step: COMPLETE, REGULAR WATERING.
  • Step 4: Verify the soil’s aeration.
  • Do an annual soil treatment in step five.
  • Step 6 is to fertilize less frequently.

Why should I Wiggle my Fiddle leaf fig?

Your indoor tree’s trunk can be moved to simulate wind, which will help you become more resilient outside. You can also leave your tree outside for extended periods of time to strengthen its trunk and expose it to the elements. Once you get the leaves inside, be sure to inspect them for bugs.

What are the best growing conditions for an indoor fiddle leaf fig tree?

Know that your fiddle leaf fig tree prefers moderate temperature changes and place it in a sunny spot within the house. The tree should be planted in a container with well-draining soil that is kept humid but not soggy since this might cause root rot.

Why isn’t my fiddle leaf fig tree flowering?

You should be careful not to overwater your fiddle leaf fig because it is prone to root rot. When storing the fig within a container, make sure the bottom has lots of holes to allow for proper drainage.

How do I fix a leggy fiddle leaf fig tree?

Give a leggy or tilted fiddle leaf fig tree bright, filtered sunshine as treatment. Please place your plant in the area of the house that gets the most indirect sunlight, which is usually six to eight hours per day. Don’t keep it in the Sun for too long, though; doing so could scorch the leaves.

Will wiggling my fiddle leaf fig tree weaken its roots?

Every one to two weeks, wiggle your fiddle leaf fig tree for 1.5 to 2 minutes to significantly thicken the trunk. Beginning with light shaking, progressively build up the force. If your plant is stake-supported, move it about at first with the support in place. You can take the stake out once your fig tree has gotten used to this practice.

What happens if the top of a fiddle leaf fig is chopped off?

Your fiddle leaf fig probably has no other branches that will allow it to transition from a fiddle leaf shrub to a fiddle leaf tree. In addition, bear the following in mind before proceeding:

The amount of regrowth that results from pruning depends on how severe it was. The reason for this is that the plant is trying to grow again in an effort to balance the root system below with the shoot system above, which is now designed to support the plant at its bigger size before trimming.

Usually, the most active shoot growth takes place 6 to 8 inches after the pruning cut.

Make the cut on your fiddle leaf fig

Make a decision regarding the size of the Ficus lyrata cut. Once more, the branching will be more noticeable the longer a part is clipped. (And the less the plant will grow in height, at least for that shoot.)

Your fiddle leaf fig won’t be encouraged to generate as many lateral branches off of the main trunk if you simply pinch out the fresh buds at the top with your fingers.

If you want to encourage a little lateral development to make your plant appear fuller near the top, pinching is more helpful.

On the other hand, you’ll see a lot more branching if you remove 12 of the top shoots.

Choose the node that you want to cut above. The spots on stems known as nodes are where leaves, buds, or branches can grow. However, not every node has leaves or branches; some nodes may only have a mark and a little thickening of the stem. Internodes are the parts of the stem that lie between the nodes.

3. Make use of a clean pair of pruners. Just above the top of your node, make the cut. Cut just above the node rather than into it, which would harm it.

Any plant in the fig family, including your fiddle leaf fig, will exude an oozing, milky, white sap when cut. Simply avoid eating it, getting it in your eyes, or letting it land on the carpet because it can be annoying.

4. As a final piece of advice, wait to remove leaves from the trunk of your fiddle leaf until the new branches have begun to grow. Your plant should be as robust as possible because those leaves aid in the development of the new lateral buds.

(Are you wondering what to do with the plant pieces you pruned? Why not cultivate a second fiddle leaf fig?

I’m done now! Now, give your new lateral buds, which will eventually grow into branches, a few weeks. While the exact length of time varies on a number of variables, your chances of success are higher if you attempt this in the spring, when fiddle leaves are actively growing, as opposed to the winter, when they are largely dormant. In comparison to winter, when the plant will need more time to heal the cut and form new buds, springtime will see rapid new development.

Why are the leaves on my fiddle leaf fig so tiny?

If your fiddle leaf (Ficus lyrata) starts sprouting little leaves, something is definitely wrong. This lovely plant is well-known for its broad, veined leaves, some of which resemble fiddles.

Every four to six weeks, new leaves should begin to sprout; these should be roughly the same size as the older leaves.

Incorrect water intake, excessive sunlight, and a lack of nutrients are the three main reasons fiddle leaf figs have short leaves (fertilizer). Continue reading to learn how to maintain the delicate balance that is required.

Let’s now explore the reasons for the FLF’s stunted leaf growth. By doing so, you can pinpoint the precise cause of the issue and then take action to resolve it.

What makes a fiddle leaf fig shake?

“To keep my fiddle upright while it was young and immature, I used a wooden dowel. I was able to remove the dowel and it no longer need extra support because it was able to strengthen itself over time as it grew and with frequent shakings, Paige added.

So even though I wouldn’t advise you to shake your plants firmly, giving them a gently rock would not harm them. In addition to your FLF, I can see this idea working well for Rubber plants, Monsteras, Alocasia, and Pilea plants. They all have thick stems that frequently need to support a lot of weight as the leaves enlarge. This will probably become a regular component of how I take care of my plants. Play some music, get moving, and invite my plants to join in. It seems like it would be enjoyable.