How To Grow A Dracaena Plant

  • Avoid using city water if at all feasible, and water when the top inch of soil is dry.
  • Start feeding with plant food one month after planting.
  • When the plant becomes too tall, prune it.

With their strap-like leaves and tree-like look, dracaena plants give your collection of indoor plants some variation. The “lucky bamboo” (Dracaena sanderiana), which is technically not a bamboo at all, is one of the many well-liked varieties of dracaena plants.

Dracaena fragrans, sometimes known as “corn plant,” has thick brown stems and green leaves that resemble corn plants (frequently with a yellow stripe running through the middle of them).

Dracaena deremensis is a hardy species with leaf blades that are thinner than those of Dracaena fragrans; well-known variants include Limelight and Janet Craig.

You might also wish to think about the so-called “dragon tree,” Dracaena marginata. It can get up to 10 feet tall and has slender brown stems with tufts of spiky leaves on top.

These types are all simple to maintain. Simply adhere to these instructions to grow dracaena plants.

Is it simple to grow dracaena?

Dracaenas are popular plants that require very little maintenance and are grown for their lovely foliage. There are more than 100 species of dracaena trees and succulent shrubs, however due to their ease of cultivation and tolerance of low light, many are grown as houseplants. These tropical plants, which belong to the Dracaena genus and the asparagus family and are hardy in USDA Zones 10 and 11, are excellent for providing structure to outdoor gardens. They are considered as annuals in colder climates.

Dracaenas can purify indoor air of benzene, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde, and trichloroethylene, according to NASA studies. They should be kept out of the reach of household pets like dogs and cats because they are harmful to them.

Is Dracena a healthy houseplant?

Dracaena reflexa, sometimes referred to as song of India or pleomele, is the most popular dracaena species. Its leaves are its main draw as one of the most attractive indoor plants. The yellow stripes on these houseplant’s slender, pointed leaves are impossible to miss. This flexible houseplant does well both indoors and in a slightly shaded outside space, such as a patio.

Dracaena marginata, also known as the red-edge dracaena or Madagascar dragon tree, is an evergreen tree that, given the right conditions, may reach heights of eight to fifteen feet and widths of three to eight feet. It features narrow, curved stalks for trunks and stiff, purplish-red leaves. It is frequently grown inside because it cannot survive low light and is not frost resistant. They are among the more forgiving dracaena plants and can withstand drought, making them great houseplants.

Massangean Dracaena

Mass cane or corn plant, also known as Dracaena fragrans massangeana or Dracaena massangeana, is a popular indoor plant. It is the most affordable variety of dracaena and is reasonably priced when compared to other indoor plants. Mass cane is distinguished by its long, strap-like leaves and thick, woody canes. It can tolerate low light levels, while moderate natural lighting is preferred. Because Dracaena massangeana grows slowly, it can occupy a place for a long period without needing much upkeep.

How is a dracaena plant cared for indoors?

The Dracaena Gold Star can live in low light but loves strong indirect light. Small new leaves, limited growth, and less variegated leaves are signs of inadequate light. The leaves will burn if there is too much direct sunlight.

When the top 75% of the soil is dry, water. Pour water into the pot until it begins to drain through the drainage hole at the bottom, then drain any excess water into the saucer.

While your Dracaena Gold Star will benefit from routine misting, it will thrive in areas with average humidity levels.

The ideal temperature range for your dracaena is between 65 and 80 degrees. When it is below 55 degrees, they struggle. The leaves might be harmed by chilly winter drafts and blowing heaters.

For indoor plants, use a liquid fertilizer once a month in the spring and summer.

Both humans and animals are poisoned by dracaena leaves. Usually, eating will make you feel sick to your stomach and mouth, and you might even vomit.

When the leaf tips dry out and turn brown, this is a typical issue known as “tipping.” The most frequent culprit is tap water, which has salts, chlorine, fluoride, and other potentially dangerous substances in excess. You can use distilled water or rainwater to stop this.

The best conditions for a dragon plant

Dracaena prefer direct, bright light. Experiencing too much sun can cause leaves to burn. For humidity, it’s a good idea to grow them in a bathroom or kitchen.

Let the top few centimeters of soil dry out before watering again because dragon plants prefer underwatering over overwatering.

For indoor plants, I believe multifunctional compost is inappropriate. It is bulky, retains moisture, and takes a while to dry out. Most indoor plants, including Dracaena, do better with a free-draining potting compost like John Innes No. 2 with additional grit. Just make sure to keep an eye on it and water when it gets dry.

Maintain a temperature of 18–32°C for dragon plants, making sure it doesn’t fall below 15°C in the winter.

In the summer, give your dragon plant a balanced liquid feed every two weeks at half strength.

Dracaena can be easily reproduced by tip cuttings. Tropical plants can be propagated throughout the year, but the seasons with the most light and heat are spring and summer. Cut any stem tip that is around 8 cm long and above a node away from the parent plant if your plant has several branches. One-third of the lowest leaves should be removed and placed in a water-filled jar on a windowsill. Regularly changing the water will cause roots to emerge in a few weeks. Plant it in a pot large enough to fit the roots in a free-draining soil. On the parent plant where the cutting was made, a new shoot will also grow.

Do dragons like the sun?

The smooth, gray stems of the Dracaena marginata eventually reach a height of 20 feet. Crowns of slender, leathery leaves up to 2 feet long and 1/2 inch wide form the ends of stems. Deep glossy green leaves with a reddish crimson border. Dracaena is a fantastic houseplant for rooms with low lighting, and it looks particularly good when planted in pairs to flank doorways.

Dracaena prefers bright, indirect light for growing; it may survive lower light levels, but development will be slowed. With typical indoor potting soil, typical house temperatures, and ordinary humidity levels, the plant thrives nicely. Maintain a wet but not soggy soil by fertilizing frequently with a complete fertilizer in the spring and summer (like a squeezed-out sponge). Reduce your watering frequency and discontinue fertilizing during the fall and winter. Regularly clean leaves with a wet cloth or relocate your plant so it can receive a moderate shower to keep Dracaena healthy and looking its best. Avoid using commercial leaf shine. Simply use a pair of scissors to remove any brown tips that appear on your plant, being careful to preserve the natural form of the trimmed leaves. Dracaena is rarely troubled by pests or diseases and can endure a pot-bound environment for extended periods of time.

How frequently should dracaenas be watered?

PRO TIP: If you’re unsure, let it rain! Overwatering is the most frequent error with these plants.

Always evaluate your plant’s watering requirements as soon as you get one. It is important to check the soil’s moisture content first to make sure it isn’t wet directly under the surface before giving your plant a drink. Additionally, think about aerating your plant’s soil before to the first watering. Aerating can help the soil breathe and enable rainwater to escape since we compact the soil to prevent it from shifting while being transported.

Dracaena trees prefer the soil to be moist but not fully dry between waterings. Usually, watering once every 10 to 14 days will keep the soil’s moisture content good and even. The soil should never be wet as this plant is susceptible to root rot; yet, if the earth becomes completely dry, the plant’s leaves will have brown tips. The Dracaena Lisa Cane will respond favorably to routine waterings after you establish a routine. The Dracaena also enjoys moisture, so a humidifier, pebble tray, or routine misting will be appreciated.

To maintain balanced growth on all sides, rotate your plant occasionally, and dust the leaves frequently to help the plant photosynthesize well. Take the chance to check the undersides of the leaves when dusting them and keep an eye out for bugs.

Keep in mind that every plant is a distinct living creature with different demands depending on where it is. You can have a long and fulfilling relationship with your dracaena lisa cane if you pay attention to its health and watering requirements.

Must I remove the brown leaf tips?

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We’ve experienced our fair share of brown, decaying leaves as we’ve learned how to properly care for various home plants over the years. We weren’t sure at first whether to take them out or leave them. Here is what we’ve discovered works the best.

Do you need to remove the dead leaves? Yes. Your indoor plants should have brown and withering leaves removed as quickly as possible, but only if they are more than 50% damaged. By removing these leaves, the plant looks better and the healthy foliage that is left can receive more nutrients.

Even though it might appear straightforward, there’s more to it than merely cutting those leaves off. To keep your plant healthy, you must assess how much of the leaf is dying and then carefully remove the damaged areas.

Should I trim my dracaena’s brown tips?

You have complete discretion over whether to remove the brown tips from your dracaena plant. The worthless tips of these hideous Dracaena leaves are equally as ugly. With a clean, sharp pair of scissors, you may remove brown tips, which are dead plant debris. Take care because doing so could result in uneven and visually unpleasant leaf ends on your Dracaena.

When cutting out brown tips, be careful not to cut into healthy leaf tissue. To prevent overcutting the leaf, which can cause further browning of the leaf, it is better to leave a tiny margin of the brown leaf next to the healthy leaf tissue.

What is the lifespan of dracaena plants?

  • The Dracaena Marginata is one of the most well-liked houseplants since it requires very little maintenance and its tropical appearance fits in well with contemporary settings.
  • It can survive for up to ten years in a pot with adequate care and has an even longer life expectancy outside.
  • Greek noun dracaena has been romanized as dracaena. In general, it means a she-dragon. Its name is derived from the enormous size of a wild Dragon Tree.
  • Diseases are not a problem for the Madagascar Dragon Tree, but scale, thrips, mealybugs, and spider mites can occasionally be an issue. It is best to regularly inspect the plant and spot pests before they cause damage.
  • The ability of this plant to purify the air is excellent. It not only combats indoor pollution, but it also offers excellent allergy protection. For filtering benzene, lead, carbon dioxide, cigarette smoke, and various VOCs, it is especially helpful.
  • The plant’s leaves are loaded in antioxidants, and traditional medicine occasionally uses them to treat headaches and eye soreness.
  • Although this plant is not poisonous to people, it can be extremely harmful to animals, especially cats and dogs. When pets chew on the leaves, the poisonous alkyds they contain can make them sick. Vomiting and excessive salivation are examples of poisoning symptoms.

Why are the tips of my dracaena brown?

Underwatering or letting your Dracaena lie dry for an extended period of time is the most frequent cause of browning leaf tips in Dracaena plants. When the top 75 percent of the soil in the pot is dry, water your Dracaena. Never let the soil become drenched or moist. In the winter, you can let your plant dry out between waterings more, but be sure to increase humidity by spraying your plant frequently, using a humidifier, or using a pebble tray.

Make sure to water your Dracaena thoroughly enough for the water to drain into the saucer through the drainage hole at the bottom of the pot. It’s crucial to empty the saucer of any extra water and to avoid letting your plant stay in any standing water. Wet feet are not good for your dracaena since they will cause the roots to rot and eventually kill the plant.

The dracaena’s leaves may be turning brown due to the quality of your water. The majority of tap water contains compounds that are toxic to dracaena plants. Before watering, use filtered water or let your tap water hang out overnight without cover so that contaminants like chlorine can vaporize.

Dry soil and low humidity make leaves droop and brown on the edges, which is followed by overall yellowing and browning and leaf drop. The humidity will rise if you often mist the leaves of your Dracaena. For a sustained increase in humidity, you might also use a humidifier or a pebble tray.

Dracaenas are more vulnerable to pest infestations when they are stressed or feeble. Spider mites and other sap-sucking insects can dehydrate your plant. Leaflets and fronds quickly start to yellow as a result of this issue. In an interior environment, scale, mealybugs, and spider mites are usually present. These tiny pests multiply and travel into nooks and crannies along frond portions if they are not eliminated at an early stage. The insects’ piercing jaws fatigue your plant and hasten yellowing, particularly if your Dracaena is already unwell due to inadequate lighting, nutrient inadequacy, or insufficient soil moisture.

Is your Dracaena showing signs of fresh growth? This discoloration is normal if there is new growth on your plant and older, especially towards the bottom of the plant, browning and yellowing leaves. Old leaves on your plant are shed, and new growth is energized.

When should my dracaena be repotted?

Repotting Dracaenas is best done in the spring, summer, and early fall. The ideal seasons to live in if you have an early winter are spring and summer. In Tucson, the fall season lasts just until the end of October.

Repotting should ideally be avoided in the winter if at all possible because plants like to rest then.

Soil mix

A rich, rather chunky soil mixture that drains well is preferred by dracaenas. The roots shouldn’t be left too damp since this can cause them to decay.

My plant was growing in a mixture that had a fair amount of lava rock in it. To make my mix well aerated and lighter than the original mix, I wanted to incorporate rock into it. Alternative mixtures (with only two ingredients) are provided below in case your dracaena isn’t developing in a mix with rock.

Use peat-based potting soil that is designed for indoor plants. I switch between Ocean Forest and Happy Frog.