How To Care For An Anthurium Houseplant

Although anthurium plants can withstand all intensities of indirect light, those that do so will produce fewer flowers and develop more slowly. However, because direct sunlight can burn the leaves, these plants cannot tolerate it. Bright, directional light is best for their growth.

The soil must be free draining but retain some water in order to properly care for anthuriums. An equal mixture of potting soil and orchid soil or perlite will give the type of soil that anthuriums prefer if you are growing this plant as a houseplant. Plant outside in a spot that has good drainage. Anthurium plants dislike soil that is constantly wet.

Don’t overwater your anthurium plant, but be sure to water it frequently. Anthuriums should only be watered when the soil feels dry to the touch. Too much water may kill the roots because the plant is prone to root rot. The rootball will be challenging to re-wet if you let the plant’s pot become too dry, which will slow down its growth. If the rootball in the pot gets too dry, give the anthurium plant’s container an hour in the sink to rehydrate it.

Anthurium plant maintenance doesn’t call for a lot of fertilizer. Once every three to four months, the plant only needs to be treated with a fertilizer that is 1/4 strength. Use a fertilizer with a greater phosphorus amount to produce the best flowers (the middle number).

Anthurium care is simple and straightforward. Watering is easy after the plant is in the appropriate soil and location. Your home or garden will benefit from having an anthurium blooming there by producing lovely, long-lasting flowers.

How often should an anthurium be watered?

H2O and Humidity

Low to medium water requirements apply to this houseplant. In between waterings, let the soil to dry out. If you reside in a hot climate, water your lawn once every two to three days; if it rains frequently, water as needed. The anthurium needs appropriate drainage most of all.

Why are the anthurium leaves turning brown?

Brown leaves may indicate your plant isn’t getting enough of the minerals it requires. Anthuriums require nutrients like nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium to grow.

Many anthurium growers use controlled-release fertilizers to prevent this issue, but if your leaves have already turned brown, you might wish to use a liquid fertilizer for a few weeks until your plant recovers. Just remember to dilute the liquid fertilizer to 25% of the advised strength.

Where should an anthurium be placed?

The anthurium enjoys being situated in a bright area, but not in the sun. Because the plant’s leaves may burn if it is placed in direct sunlight. Because the anthurium prefers warmth, avoid placing it in a dark location where it will produce fewer blossoms. Avoid placing your plant near a hot radiator and keep it away from draughts. An anthurium flowers best when the temperature is between 20 and 22 C.

How are anthuriums kept from blooming?

Anthuriums are renowned for their extravagant, exotic flower bracts, which frequently bloom all year long and appear in vivid hues of red, pink, and white. Therefore, it can be very upsetting if your anthurium isn’t flowering while generating foliage that seems healthy.

Why isn’t my anthurium in bloom? Since anthuriums are fussy about their surroundings, problems like wet soil or inadequate illumination might keep them from flowering. By giving your anthurium plenty of indirect sunlight, appropriate watering, high humidity, and weekly feedings with diluted phosphorus-rich fertilizer, you may encourage it to bloom.

Seek out a copy of my book, “Houseplants Made Easy,” if you want to maintain all of your indoor plants healthy and flowering year after year.

Do I need to mist anthurium?

A humid atmosphere is ideal for anthurium. As a result, you must water evenly and use lukewarm water for your spray. Depending on the particulars of your case, this will change. You might need to spritz your anthurium every day and water it every few days if you live in a hot, dry climate. You might go a week or two without watering in a humid environment.

The soil squeeze test is the greatest general rule to follow. Insert your finger into the ground up to the first joint. Take a little soil out with your hands. You don’t need to give the plant any more water if you can roll the soil into a ball and squeeze out water or if the ball stays together. Give the dirt some water if you can’t roll it into a ball and it’s powdery.

In terms of fertilizer, you can feed it a mild water-soluble fertilizer every two to three weeks during the growing season. Winter is the wrong time to fertilize. Even if the plant is kept indoors, it will typically require more water in the spring and summer. Depending on the particular climatic circumstances in your area during the fall and winter, you may want to minimize your watering.

Does Miracle Grow benefit anthurium plants?

In a 5-8 inch (12.5-20 cm) pot, bury the top of the root ball 1 inch (2.5 cm) into the dirt. Use a potting soil that is light, permeable, and well-draining. Only repot anthurium plants when they have grown root-bound in a pot one size larger than the one they are now in.

Which soil mixture works best is a topic on which there are many different viewpoints in the gardening community. Perlite, peat moss, moisture control potting mix, and orchid potting mix seem to work best for anthuriums in my experience.

Anthurium should I bottom water?

There are many various ways to irrigate this group of unusual plants. Anthuriums originate in the rainforest in the natural. Instead of growing in the soil, they do so naturally on top of objects (like mossy trees). They dislike damp dirt around their roots because of this. How therefore can we bring them happiness?

We favor bottom watering since it distributes water more evenly, is less likely to cause overwatering, and won’t wash away nutrients. In a drip tray that is 2 cm (34 in) deep, place the plant, then fill the tray to the top. After 20 minutes, the water will finally be sucked up into the dry root ball of the plant. Once all the water has been pulled up, remove it and drain it.

Using ice cubes is a common fix. They are an effective “slow-release” watering technique that won’t flood your plant with liquid all at once. Use caution while determining how many (and what size) ice cubes to place on your plant, keeping in mind that your small Anthurium is just that—mini. Keep in mind that you don’t want to expose it to too much cold. Therefore, especially at first, little may be more. It might be required to water your plant more regularly with this strategy.

The most typical remedy is to “let it rain.” (After all, they are from the rainforests.) Make careful to completely cover the soil’s surface with water as you pour it from above, then allow gravity to work its way through the container. You would need to water your plant less frequently if you used this strategy. Use water that is at normal temperature and take care not to shock the root system. Soak it completely until water begins to drain through the drainage hole.

Do you use ice cubes to water anthuriums?

Overwatering is one of the most typical anthurium care errors. Our anthurium will thrive when the soil has a chance to partially dry out in between waterings. We advise watering with 6 ice cubes or 1/2 cup of water once a week. Root rot can result from excessive or frequent watering, which could have a negative impact on your plant’s long-term health.

If you accidentally overwater something, try removing any rotting roots and waiting until the soil is mostly dry before watering it again. If you discover root rot early, you might be able to recover. Also, remove extra water from the pot on a regular basis.

Do I need to remove the Brown anthurium leaves?

An anthurium can be pruned for a number of reasons. The most crucial one is: you can take your time and enjoy it! Because an anthurium plant expends a lot of energy trying to revive wilting blossoms and aged foliage. However, if you remove them, the plant will be able to use that energy to produce fresh blossoms and leaves! That is what we desire, right? Everything you need to know about pruning an anthurium is covered in this article.

How can I tell if my anthurium is in trouble?

Remember that it won’t be possible to revive your plant if it is fully dead. Your anthurium can be too far gone if ALL of the leaves and blooms are completely brown and crispy, or if ALL of the leaves have fallen off.

You can probably still salvage your anthurium if it is simply wilting or drooping or if the leaves have some brown patches on them. If you take care of issues as soon as they arise, you can repair problems including yellowing, losing leaves, and unblooming blooms.

Let’s examine some typical issues that lead to anthurium plant decline and how to resolve them to restore your plant.

Brown leaf margins and leaf tips

Are the edges of your anthurium’s leaves brown? She then consumes too much or not enough water. It would be preferable to examine the potting compost before watering. The Anthurium could use a spray of water if the potting compost seems pretty dry; however, if the potting compost feels moist, this can wait another week.

Yellow leaves

The Anthurium is likely receiving too much sunshine if the leaves start to turn yellow. In this situation, move the plant back from the window by about a meter. Trimming away faded flowers and old, yellowed foliage is safe because the anthurium will just grow additional flowers as the old leaves and blossoms turn color.

Can anthurium be grown in bathrooms?

Plants in bathrooms are fashionable. (Happily, that means I’m in trend for once, as my bathroom is decorated with a few plants.) And this trend actually makes sense, unlike other ones (like the bizarre Starbucks Unicorn Frappuccino). Shower plants are more popular on Pinterest, where searches for them have increased by 300 percent, and are also being discussed on well-known websites like Popsugar and Mashable.

Plant maintenance can be greatly simplified by growing plants in your bathroom (or shower). The majority of indoor plants are native to warm, humid tropical climates, so they will benefit from the additional moisture that the sink and shower add to the air. Additionally, keeping plants in your bathroom can help you remember to water them because it’s a space you use frequently.

Even better, it’s commonly recognized that houseplants may purify the air in a room. NASA described how they get rid of dangerous VOCs including formaldehyde and benzene. While we frequently concentrate on the VOCs that can be harmful, virtually every aroma in the air is a product of VOCs. Therefore, adding plants to the bathroom may help the space smell cleaner.

It seems that keeping a plant in the bathroom may also aid in keeping it clean. According to a scientific study presented at the American College of Asthma & Immunology’s annual meeting, English ivy (Hedera helix) is capable of removing more than 75% of airborne mold spores. Another academic study from Washington State University revealed that plants may also draw dust and other airborne particulates, suggesting yet another method that plants might make your bathroom cleaner.

Intriguing scientific evidence also supports the idea that being around plants might increase our feelings of peace, joy, and relaxation. Plants in the bathroom (or shower) could make the area feel more spa-like. I don’t know about you, but I have lots of memories of hectic days ending with a lengthy, hot shower.

What kind of plants should you grow in your shower or bathroom? Here are a few of my suggestions.

Bathroom Plants for Low Lighting These plants can be displayed on a shelf, in a corner of your bathroom counter, or hung from a hook because they don’t take up a lot of room.

Hemigraphis, often known as the dragon’s tongue, has a wonderfully textured appearance and resembles little decorative grass. It has backward-colored purple leaves that are vivid green on the front. Terrariums, toilets, and showers are the ideal environments for it because it enjoys warm, humid air.

Lucky bamboo (Dracaena) is so simple to grow that potting soil is not even necessary! Simply place this stunning plant in a vase with water, keep it out of the sun, and watch it flourish. You can purchase lucky bamboo that has been cultivated conventionally with straight stems or that has been artistically arranged with canes that have been trained to grow in spirals, circles, and other shapes.

Fittonia, or nerve plant, is a vibrant plant that doesn’t require intense light to survive. It doesn’t even require sunlight to function; a light bulb’s constant glow will suffice. If you want to add a splash of living texture to your bathroom’s decor, nerve plants are a perfect choice because of their colorful leaf.

Hemigraphis, often known as the waffle plant, has rich purple-green foliage that looks beautiful almost anyplace. If you want to create a living wall in your bathroom because you want something compact and mounding, this plant is a perfect option because it can grow vertically.

Big Plants for Bathrooms with Low Lighting Consider any of these options to fill a vacant area in your bathroom if you’re fortunate enough to have space for a floor plant.

Anthurium, often known as the “Jungle Queen,” is a very bold and low-maintenance plant. With its enormous, frequently variegated leaves, it quickly gives you a stylish appearance. Jungle Queen is incredibly low maintenance and can survive without watering for weeks.

Growing monstera, commonly known as split-leaf philodendron, in your bathroom will allow you to capitalize on two current trends. (Don’t know what it is? Visit Instagram and look for the hashtag #MonsteraMonday.) It has large, sharply cut leaves that provide an eye-catching texture. Just think of the possibilities for your shower!

The most striking peace lilies (Spathiphyllum) are the enormous varieties like “Sensation,” which can reach heights of 5 feet or more. They are highly regarded for being some of the best air-purifying plants available and have enormous dark green leaves.

There are numerous varieties of snake plant (Sansevieria), and they are all quite simple to grow. Because they grow straight up and take up little horizontal space in your bathroom, tall types are fantastic. It requires less water than Jungle Queen, so you don’t have to worry about watering it.

Small Plants for Bathrooms with Light If you have a bathroom with natural light, I envy you because I don’t. Happily, you may use a variety of colorful options on window sills, countertops, and for hanging from hooks or poles.

> Because anthuriums prefer warm, muggy air, they make excellent bathroom plants. All through the year, they provide lush, heart-shaped foliage and vibrant flowers. The flowers on the majority of blooming anthurium cultivars persist longer—more than a month—when there is a lot of moisture in the air.

> Guzmania kinds of bromeliads make great air purifiers (says 2016 research from the State University of New York). They provide grassy foliage with tropical flowers of exuberant color. They are stylish, easy to maintain, and look great on a shower shelf.

English ivy (Hedera helix) can withstand low light, although it thrives in areas with more light. There are many different leaf sizes and shapes available in variegated variations and types.

Like English ivy, moth orchid (Phalaenopsis) tolerates low light, but it grows more quickly (and blooms a little better) in areas with more light. Enjoy its beautiful blossoms for months and benefit from its potent air purifying properties.

Large Plants for Bathrooms with Light Elegant floor plants in your bathroom will showcase your passion of plants. Here are some excellent choices to get you going.

An lovely tree with woody stems and strappy, multicolored foliage is the corn plant (Dracaena). It is simple to grow anyplace and is excellent for creating a spa-like atmosphere in your bathroom.

One of the hottest plants around is the fiddle leaf fig (Ficus lyrata). Its enormous leaves offer any space a rich, tropical appearance. If you add one, your bathroom will be immediately Instagram-ready.

With its feathery fronds, the Majesty Palm (Ravenearivularis) offers texture. It is a Madagascar native that like the damp, humid environments of your bathroom or shower.

> The Ti plant (Cordyline) brings vibrant color into every space! The majority of variants feature purple-green foliage with crimson, magenta, or hot pink variegation. You’ll adore the way its leaves filter the air and how beautiful they are.