How To Water Air Plants In Winter

Another watering challenge is presented by flowering air plants. Most air plants will require more frequent watering while in bloom, but you should take care to prevent rot by making sure the water doesn’t pool in the core of the plant. The blooming period will be shortened by wetting the flower. The ideal way to water a flower is to keep the leaves submerged but not the flower itself. “If that’s too challenging, frequently mist the foliage while avoiding wetting the blossom. Alternatively, you can place the air plants in a bowl of gently running water while making sure to just soak the leaves and not the blossoms “Steil adds.

How frequently should winter air plants be watered?

We start using heaters, dressing warmly, and savoring the comfort of the season throughout the winter months. How about your air plants, though? Do they require special care?

We prefer to modify our air plant care routine to meet our surroundings, including the temperature, humidity, and type of plant you are taking care of. A key component of keeping your air plants healthy and flourishing is keeping note of seasonal variations.

Temperature: You should make sure that none of your air plants are left outside if you live in a region of the country where nighttime lows fall below 50 degrees. Despite the fact that some types can tolerate lower temperatures, it is best to be safe than to risk having your plants become too chilly. Most air plants like temperatures between 50 and 90 degrees because they are tropical plants. If you do decide to bring them inside, make sure they continue to receive adequate water and light to grow.

Humidity: Because of the use of heaters during the cooler months, there is a lack of humidity in the air. Make sure your plants receive enough water at least once every week. If you soak them, make sure they are totally dry before putting them back in their terrariums by letting them dry for at least 4 hours in a warm environment. Heaters can also dry out your plants, so to make sure they receive enough moisture to thrive, you might need to mist them between waterings.

In the colder months, your air plants may require more frequent watering if you reside in a dry region. We check on our plants every day to make sure they are getting enough water, even in Florida, where we have more moderate winter temps.

Displaying plants too close to a heater or air vent, or too near a cold or drafty window, is a quick way to destroy them. Even while we like the warmth that a heater provides, too much heat might dry out your plants. Additionally, standing too close to a cold window might shock your plants and could even kill them. Always make sure that air plants have access to enough air movement by never leaving them in a closed-off terrarium.

Light: During the shorter days of the year, it can be more difficult to obtain bright light, but just make sure your air plants are still receiving enough indirect light. As long as the plants aren’t too distant from it and receive enough of it each day, artificial light can serve as a sufficient source.

How should air plants be cared for throughout the winter?

It’s now time to bring any air plants you have left outside inside as the weather becomes colder! Since air plants are native to tropical climes, it will probably be required to move your plants indoors during the winter if you reside in a northern region. Moving air plants indoors is a good idea once the nights start getting cold (below 40 degrees Fahrenheit).

Your air plants will experience higher humidity and more light throughout the summer than they will during the winter. The plants may experience some stress as their habitat will quickly change as we bring them indoors. We offer some advice to assist you relocate your air plants indoors with as little stress as possible!

Your air plants won’t experience too many severe temperature changes because you’ll be relocating them inside your house, where the temperature is stable. Because your plants will be alright as long as you maintain your home’s temperature between 55 and 85 degrees (likely for most people), you shouldn’t worry too much about it. Your plants can be harmed and have issues more so when the humidity is changed to dryness and there is less sunlight.

Just be aware that the air will be a little dryer if you use a heater, fireplace, wood stove, etc. Keep in mind that placing your air plants too close to a fireplace can cause damage from the heat and embers. Just be careful not to place your plants directly in the path of any warm air flow, since forced air heating can also be harmful. Ensure that your air plants are located in a spot with some indirect sunlight as well.

If you don’t use mistings to counteract the dryness, it could be harmful to your air plants. Continually add an extra sprinkling while maintaining your regular water cycle. You can sprinkle the air or spray the plant directly. The misting of air differs slightly from that of plants. To assist restore some humidity to the air, spritz the area immediately surrounding the plant rather than spraying it directly. To aid with the dryness, you can also add humidity to the air by surrounding the plants with some decorative bowls or shells filled with water.

Decorate your bathroom with air plants and let it receive enough of natural light as another approach to fight winter dryness. Every time someone takes a shower, air plants receive a decent blast of humidity, which makes for lovely bathroom d├ęcor. You can purchase some gorgeous vases to display on various shelves or the bathroom counter. Another great alternative is to use cork bark, wood, or any other thing you’d like to cover with air plants to create a vertical garden on the walls of your bathroom! Just keep in mind that even though they will get soaked from the shower humidity, weekly soaking/watering will still be required.

It’s crucial to think about where you can get natural light in your house. The best places to survive the winter are not in dimly lit rooms, hallways, or shelves. Given that the sun is much weaker and there are fewer hours in the day during the winter, you do not need to totally avoid direct sunlight. Give your air plants at least 5 hours of the sunniest light each day during the winter. Try to keep your air plants 10 feet or less from windows.

If you keep a watch on all of your plants, especially in the beginning as you are figuring out your new watering schedule, you should be able to see any issues early enough to correct them, so don’t worry too much about the transition from outdoor to indoor! Your air plants may require a bit more moisture if, for instance, you notice curled leaves or dry tips. Simply check them frequently, then adjust your watering as necessary. Simply increase your weekly watering from once to twice and add mistings to see if that makes a difference. After a week or two, if they aren’t adapting to that shift sufficiently, it might be because they aren’t getting enough indirect sunlight. Simply try shifting them to a better location, and they ought to get better!

Other wintertime factors:

Fireplaces. Maintain a safe distance between your plants and the heat and embers of your fireplace.

circulation of air Your plants should not be too close to a heating duct, but they should have access to adequate air to dry out after watering.

Light. Bright light is essential, therefore if it cannot be provided naturally, utilize artificial lighting at all costs. However, please read my post on indoor lighting and don’t place your air plants too close to an incandescent bulb. Also, please don’t put your Christmas tree’s air plants indoors. Your plants will burn from the hot lights on the tree.

How frequently do I need to water my air plant?

For the best care, your plants should be watered 2-3 times each week in addition to once every week. Every 2-3 weeks, a 2-hour bath should be taken. You will need to water or mist your plants more frequently if you live in a hotter, drier region. Your plant’s leaves will start to feel heavier and more wet after watering, and they will be softer and lighter in color when they require more water. Dehydration may be indicated by leaves that are wrinkled or rolled.

How should I water my air plants?

Soaking air plants in water improves their performance. They do not ingest any nutrients through their roots but rather through their leaves. Nothing more is accomplished by the roots than anchoring the air plant to a host rock, tree, or even the earth.

It is preferable to soak air plants in a bowl of water for 20 to 60 minutes once a week to 10 days. To avoid shocking the plant, make sure the water is lukewarm or at room temperature. It is best to provide air plants with water that is rich in minerals and nutrients because they obtain many of their nutrients directly from the water. The best water is rainwater, although spring water is a close second if you don’t have a convenient way to collect rainwater. Alternatively, you might utilize well, lake, or creek water. Never use filtered or distilled water. Less minerals and nutrients are present in distilled and filtered water. Many municipal water systems include fewer minerals and nutrients and more contaminants.

If you are concerned about your pH level, air plants enjoy slightly acidic water. The ideal range for alkalinity is between 5.5 and 6.0. Most frequently, tap water from the city is higher than this range, making it unsuitable for air plants. Do not worry yourself too much about PH levels. Any good, pure water would do.

After watering your air plants, thoroughly drying them off is the second most crucial step. To ensure that your air plants completely dry, put them down on a dish towel on their side or upside down. Within two hours of their bath, they should be completely dry to the touch. Wait until your air plants are completely dry before putting them back in terrariums and vases. Your air plants will be content and healthy if you follow these straightforward watering guidelines.

Do winter air plants require watering?

Since air plants are a tropical species, they must be moved indoors when the nights start to become colder than 40 degrees, something many Northerners prefer to do during the warm months. Your air plants will require some extra care to adapt to their new surroundings after you bring them indoors.

Temperature, humidity, light, and air flow are the primary factors that differentiate the indoor environment from the outdoor one.

Temperature

The ideal temperature range for air plants is 65 to 85 degrees. The likelihood is that your air plants will be at ease in your home if you are. There is hardly much cause for concern.

Humidity

In the winter, homes heated by forced-air furnaces, fireplaces, and radiators frequently feel quite dry. Consider how much more hand cream you would require to prevent your hands from becoming dry and cracked throughout the winter. It’s possible that your air plants will suffer in these dry conditions. We advise changing your watering schedule to fix the situation. Your air plants may require additional winter hydration if their leaves are curling and their tips are dry. Give them a weekly water bath, but you might also need to supplement with a weekly misting. Keep your plants away from air returns, drafty windows, and vents. Another method to raise the humidity is to put a tray of water close to your plants.

Light

Even indoors, your plants will require intense light. Most plants endure brighter winter sun when they would otherwise burn throughout the summer thanks to the lower sun angle. The ideal environment is a few feet away from a window that faces south or west. Fluorescent and grow lights are the next best options if natural light is scarce since they offer the “blue light” that plants require. When placing your plants close to incandescent light bulbs, use caution because they can become extremely hot and damage the plants.

Air Circulation

Avoid putting your plants in containers that are too small or firmly shut. Fresh air circulation is necessary for air plants since it aids in nutrient absorption. For more information on how to take care of air plants, visit the air plant care video series.

How long do air plants need to be dry?

There may be affiliate links in this content. Your purchases generate a small commission for us. Additional Affiliate Policy

An air plant’s best formula for success is proper care. Despite the fact that air plants are among the easiest indoor plants to care for, it is still preferable to give them some attention. Taking care of your air plants include giving them the water they require, the right amount of light, appropriate airflow, and fertilizers like orchid plant food to improve their health.

Without water, air plants may survive for two weeks. Additionally, the plant’s health is compromised even if it is still alive. Regarding the recommended watering regimen, you should bathe your air plants in water at least once every two weeks and spritz them once a week.

They will stay hydrated and have all the moisture they need to perform essential functions like photosynthesis if they are often watered. But what happens if you are unable to water your air plants on time? How long can they go without drinking?

To shed further light on this subject, we have put together this extremely useful post. Are you scared that your air plants will wither while you are away since you plan to be gone from home for a few days? Or perhaps you’re too busy with your schedule to give your air plants the proper amount of water? If so, you should read this article! Learn how long it takes for the absence of water to actually harm your air plants by reading on.

Do you soak air plants with their tops up?

It is best to provide air plants with water that is rich in minerals and nutrients because they obtain many of their nutrients directly from the water. The best water is rainwater, although spring water is a close second if you don’t have a convenient way to collect rainwater. Alternatively, you might utilize well, lake, or creek water. Never use filtered or distilled water. Less minerals and nutrients are present in distilled and filtered water. Many municipal water systems include fewer minerals and nutrients and more contaminants. If you are concerned about your pH level, air plants enjoy slightly acidic water. The ideal range for alkalinity is between 5.5 and 6.0. Most frequently, tap water from the city is higher than this range, making it unsuitable for air plants. Do not worry yourself too much about PH levels. Any good, pure water would do.

After watering your air plants, thoroughly drying them off is the second most crucial step. To ensure that your air plants completely dry, put them down on a dish towel on their side or upside down. For the larger species like Xerographica, Streptophylla, and Sparkler, this is especially crucial. Within two hours of their bath, they should be completely dry to the touch. Wait until your air plants are completely dry before putting them back in terrariums and vases. If you water your plants and then put them in an enclosure right away, your plant can get rot. Your air plants will be content and healthy if you follow these straightforward watering guidelines.