How To Revive An African Violet

Due to the distinctive nature of African violet leaves, your plant’s foliage will have a natural gloss. However, something is awry if you see your plant starting to produce white, powdered leaves.

African violets with powdery leaves are typically covered in mildew, a fungus. Repotting your plant, cutting back on watering, and using a secure fungicide are your best options.

Professional Advice: You may prepare a plant-safe mildew cure on a budget by mixing baking soda, water, and a spray bottle. For the best effects, mix 1 teaspoon of baking soda with a quart of water before softly misting the plant.

Q&A: African violet is wilted

My African violet’s leaves are still green, but all of a sudden it has become limp, wilted, and dangling over the container. What has happened, and what, if anything, can I do to save it?

The answer: There are a variety of reasons why houseplants wilt. Typically, either beneath or

therefore first check the soil before overwatering. The plant is obviously under hydrated if the soil is really dry. In a bowl of water, place the plant, and let the water soak up through the holes in the pot.

One of the most frequent causes of houseplant death is overwatering, which is indicated by damp soil. A soil that is consistently moist fosters an anaerobic (lacks air) environment for root growth, which promotes pests like fungus gnats and causes root rot. Take the plant away from the

velvety black roots). Plants are capable of developing new roots. Remove the rotting roots and repot the plant if the majority of the roots are still white or light-colored.

Plant in a container with multiple drainage holes using African violet soil. With either top or bottom watering,

Will my African violet resurrect?

Typically, drooping leaves mean that your plant is either thirsty or suffering from cold weather.

Give your African violet a healthy drink if you haven’t watered it in a while; the leaves should regenerate in 24 hours.

Check to discover if your African violet plant is near an air vent if, on the other hand, it is well-watered and still droopy. African violets don’t grow well when placed directly in front of heating or air conditioning vents, despite the fact that some air circulation is beneficial for the plant.

Professional Hint: African violets thrive best in environments with temperatures around 70 degrees Fahrenheit. As exposure to low temperatures can eventually cause plant collapse, be sure that nighttime temperatures don’t go below 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

My African violet is dying; why?

Probably the most well-known flowering house plant of all time is the African violet. They are readily available year-round, small, simple to grow, frequently bloom, and have an astonishing range of colors.

Basic Care

TEMPERATURES should ideally range from 65 to 70°F at night and be a little warmer during the day. The plant may fully collapse or the leaves will droop and curl if the temperature is too low. A plant may collapse due to excessive heat, dry, spindly growth, or withered, lifeless leaves.

Direct morning or late afternoon sunshine, extremely bright indirect LIGHT, fluorescent lighting, or grow lights are all preferred by African violets. Avoid midday sun since it might turn leaves brown. Too high light levels can result in overly compact growth, whereas low light levels make plants grow erect instead of flat and circular and with very long leaf stems. Plants should be rotated once every week to promote symmetrical development (unnecessary if light source is directly overhead). When cultivating miniature plants, fluorescent and grow lights should be placed no lower than 18 inches above the plant.

use a temperature of room When the touchable surface soil is dry, WATER. The majority of violet growers like to water from the bottom, however watering from the top is acceptable as long as you take care to keep chilly water off the leaves. Before exposing leaves to any direct sunlight, always make sure they are dry. Wicking or a “self-watering pot” are the two methods of bottom watering that perform best. If you decide to submerge the pot in water, remove any water that does not reach the root ball after 15 to 30 minutes.

You should occasionally flow water through the soil for several minutes, whether you top- or bottom-water. This will flush out any salts that may have accumulated from tap water or fertilizers. The most frequent cause of African violet death is overwatering. Too much water can cause plants to become limp, lose their leaves or flowers, and develop crown and stem rot. Lack of irrigation results in the plant losing strength and color, the roots shriveling and dying, and finally the plant collapsing.

African violets can endure indoor humidity that ranges from 40 to 60 percent. If your home is excessively dry, spritz your violets every day with room-temperature water, but never at night or in the middle of the day. Placing your violets on a tray with pebbles and maintaining water in the tray at a level slightly below the surface of the stones is another method to battle dry air.

Every time you water, apply a diluted, balanced FERTILIZER. The majority of African violets are fed often and grown in soilless potting mixtures. Be careful to dilute the fertilizer more than the amount suggested on the package (often 1/4 strength will do), unless the fertilizer is specifically created to be used with every watering. Violets won’t flower well if they aren’t regularly fed. An overabundance of fertilizer can burn the plant, resulting in dark leaf margins and tips. The majority of violet fertilizers contain phosphorus (P), the center of the three numbers on the label, in their formula (e.g., 15-30-15).

Remove wasted blooms and dead leaves to groom your African violets. Washing leaves every now and again with just warm water and blotting them dry. Violets have leaves with hairs that attract dust. Between baths, clean up the leaves with a gentle brush. Your violets’ symmetrical shape can be maintained by removing suckersplantlets.

Regularly check for PESTS and disease. African violets are prone to powdery mildew, a fungus that appears on leaves and blossoms as fine, white talcum powder. This issue might be avoided by providing plants with adequate air circulation. Two insects that typically affect violets are mealybug and thrips. On stems and leaves (top or bottom), mealybug appears as white, cottony spots. Thrips can be identified by their dark blossom margins, bent leaves, and pollen trails on petals. Affected plants should be isolated and treated as necessary. Your violets will grow healthier and be less prone to pests and diseases if you take good care of them.

LEAF CUTTINGS ARE USUALLY USED FOR PROPAGATION. Cut the stem of a good leaf to about 1/2 inch. Insert the stem into the cutting mixture while keeping the humidity level higher. New plants grow near the leaf’s base. Additionally, violets can be produced from seed and the leaf can be rooted in water.

Maintenance

To keep your violet looking good and to give it new growing material, REPOT it once or twice a year. As African violets mature, they lose the older, lower leaves. This process results in the formation of the “neck,” a naked stem that is unattractive and increases the plant’s susceptibility to disease. You may maintain the lovely, rosette-growing habit that a newly purchased violet possesses by repotting.

Remove your violet from the pot and take off a piece of dirt from the bottom of the root ball that is roughly equal to the length of the neck if it hasn’t yet grown a very long neck. Replant the plant in its container and cover the exposed root ball’s neck with fresh medium. The neck will send out new roots into the media.

It is better to cut the stem and root the leafy part of a plant if the neck has been allowed to grow long and curved. A new root system will develop when this short stem is placed into brand-new potting soil. Till fresh growth indicates the emergence of strong new roots, keep the potting soil moist but not waterlogged. Trailing violets should be allowed to sucker and trail freely because they do not preserve a symmetrical rosette shape. A trailer can be pruned and new plants can be established from the stem cuttings if it loses too many leaves and starts to look unappealing. When allowed to spread in the pot, little violets prefer to grow freely and retain their attractiveness.

Violets should not be over-potted. Standard African violets thrive in pots with a 4 diameter and require only periodic repottings to maintain the proper neck length. Small violets grow best in three pots. For violets to blossom, the pots must be gently constrained. Flowers that are in bud or bloom may drop off or fade fast if they are replanted, as even careful transplanting stresses the root system.

Brown Spots on Leaves

African violets should never have brown stains on them. By generating root rot, overwatering damages the root system and isolates the plant from the supply of nutrients.

If you do not provide magnesium or nitrogen, the leaves of your African violets will become discolored with brown and yellow blotches.

Edema, which is caused by the plant taking too much water, can occasionally result from overwatering. The African violet’s leaf cells are harmed by drinking too much water.

If your African violet has edema, you will observe brown, wart-like areas close to the base of the leaves.

Remove any leaves that have brown blemishes. Sadly, once brown patches form on the leaves, they are permanently damaged. Your African Violet will be able to produce new, healthy leaves more quickly if you remove them.

Root Rot And Foul Smell From Soil

If the soil does not entirely dry out between waterings or if the drainage system is not working properly, the fungus that develops will rot the roots.

Before replanting the plant, remove it from the pot and clear away any rotting dirt. Examine the stems and roots after that. To guarantee that your plants have robust, healthy roots, remove any brown or mushy ones.

After cleaning out the contaminated regions, disinfect the remaining roots by soaking them in a fungicide solution.

Your African violet has to be repotted in a fresh, well-drained bed of potting soil. (New soil is preferred, although cleaning the current soil should be sufficient if Root Rot is mild.)

Time is running out for us! Acting quickly will increase your chances of preventing root rot because it spreads swiftly.

It’s a good idea to remove any leaves that have brown patches on them. Sadly, the leaves won’t be able to recover once they start to show brown stains.

Your African Violet will have an easier time growing new, healthy leaves if you remove them.

Crown Rot

Similar to how Root Rot is identified and handled, so is Crown Rot. Where the rot has taken hold is what distinguishes them most.

Any of the roots could develop root rot, which could cause either mild or major damage. A condition called “Crown Rot” attacks the system’s top-most roots.

To treat Crown Rot, complete the Root Rot treatment procedures and apply a fungicide to the root system. Be mindful that your plant could not survive if it has severe Crown Rot.

Mold Growing on Soil

Mold in the soil is a certain indication that your African violet is receiving too much water. The top soil layer will develop moldy white specks.

Your African violet won’t be in danger from this mold (or your family). However, it is still crucial to get rid of it right away.

The mold may be completely removed if you scrape off the top layer of soil. Hydrogen peroxide mixed with a dilution can also be used to eliminate the mold.

Use five parts water to one part hydrogen peroxide. Repotting is necessary if the mold grows below the surface of the soil.

Shriveled Appearance and Mushy Stems

You are overwatering your African violet if the stems are mushy or the plant has become shriveled. A vigorous, vibrant plant will have solid stems and appear powerful and robust. When you squeeze them, if the stem gives at all, there is a problem.

A fungal infection brought on by an excess of water is indicated by mushy stems. Another indication that your African violet has perished is a shriveled appearance. In both situations, cut off the infected parts, clean the plant, and let it air dry. (Referring to Iowa State University)

Wilting

Three things can be inferred from an African violet that has withered. You are either not watering enough, watering too much, or there are bugs in your garden. Which one it is will be determined by the soil.

You are overwatering your African violet if it has wilted and the soil is moist. The African Violets can’t acquire the oxygen they require since this drowns the roots. After making any necessary repairs, let your African violet dry thoroughly.

Look for pests if your soil does not seem overly damp or dry. African violets are frequently attacked by mealybugs and cyclamen mites. Cleaning your leaves is necessary to get rid of bugs. (Source: University of Clemson)

Spraying neem oil or insecticidal soap on your leaves will smother the bugs.

If you have rubbing alcohol lying around your home, you can use it to clean each leaf of your African violet to get rid of mealybugs or cyclamen mites.

Yellow Leaves

Another indication of moisture stress from overwatering is yellow foliage. Remove any yellow leaves from your African violet plant before assessing the health of the remaining leaves.

You will need to take damage control measures if your leaves are yellow because it’s likely that your roots have rotted.

Wrinkled Leaves

Wrinkled leaves are a sign that your roots have been seriously harmed by over watering. If there are wrinkles, water cannot reach the plant tissue from the roots.

Examine your ancestry. White and hefty roots indicate good health. If your roots are mushy and brown, they must be removed. The majority of your roots may have decayed if the leaves are wrinkled.

It is worthwhile to clean and repot your roots if they are still healthy. Sadly, it is time to try again with a different African Violet if the roots all appear brown and mushy.

Curled Leaves

Overwatering is indicated by curled leaves. However, it’s also a sign that your African Violet is under stress due to the water’s temperature.

Your African violet’s roots will become chilled if you water with cold water. The leaves begin to curl downward as a result. The best water to use is at room temperature because it lessens the possibility of any temperature shock.