How To Properly Care For An African Violet

When you learn how to produce African violets, you can add a few to your indoor spaces for a burst of vibrant color when the rest of the world is mostly brown and bare. African violets can be grown indoors with little room required; for a beautiful display, combine them in tiny pots.

For the simplest African violet care, sow the seed in the proper soil. You can buy specialized mixes or create your own by mixing equal quantities peat moss, vermiculite, and perlite.

African violet plants are particular about the water they receive, so be especially careful when watering them. water that was left to stand for 48 hours with lukewarm or tepid water. Just a drop of water can damage the leaves, so always water at the base rather than drenching it.

An essential part of learning how to grow African violets is proper irrigation. When the soil no longer feels damp to the touch, water. Never allow African violets that are growing to stand in water or to totally dry off. Although wick watering from the bottom is occasionally appropriate, it might not be the greatest technique for people just starting to produce African violets.

LightGive the African violet plant the proper amount of illumination. Filtered light of a bright to moderate intensity should be allowed to reach the developing African violet. Flowering is impacted by light. Dark green African violet plants typically require a little more light than those with pale or medium green foliage.

To prevent flowers from reaching towards the light, turn containers frequently. For optimal illumination, place African violet plants 3 feet (1 m) away from a window with a south or west face. Consider adding fluorescent lights if you can’t keep this light on for eight hours.

FertilizerFertilize African violet plants using a special food designed for them or with a food that has a greater phosphorus number—the middle number in the NPK fertilizer ratio—such as 15-30-15. Every time you water, you can use a quarter-strength mixture of fertilizer. African violets that are in growth are not receiving enough fertilizer, as seen by less flowering and poorer leaf color.

When the African violets are finished, pinch the wasted flowers. This will promote the growth of further flowers.

Try growing African violets inside now that you are aware of a few growing guidelines. Garden centers near you or online have a variety of varieties.

How frequently should an African violet be watered?

Consider fluorescent lighting. Fluorescent lighting is the solution if you lack bright window light. I make use of four-foot lights that each have two cool white bulbs. I’ve successfully used one warm white and one cool white bulb in a fixture. unique plant bulbs, known as “A beautiful plant is also produced under grow lights. 8 to 12 inches is the ideal distance between the pot and the light.

How frequently should African violets be watered? “The most frequently asked question regarding African violets is how frequently they should be watered. The greatest indicator is to touch the surface of the soil; if it feels dry, it’s time to water. For best results, African violets should be given time to completely dry out in between waterings. An overwatered plant can die. A soggy, moist soil mass prevents air from penetrating the fine roots of an African violet, which they need. Half of your work is finished once you have learned the art of watering African violets.

Do African violets need to be watered from the top or bottom? Both are acceptable. It’s crucial to avoid using cold water; lukewarm or warm water is recommended. To prevent leaf spots, if you water from the top, take cautious not to get water on the leaves when the plant is in the sun. If you water from the bottom, you should dump any extra water once the plant has absorbed all that it requires. An African violet shouldn’t be left submerged in water for too long.

How is an indoor African violet cared for?

African violets are diminutive indoor plants that have fuzzy leaves and clusters of white, blue, or purple flowers. African violet care instructions are provided here!

About African Violets

African violets, as their name suggests, are indigenous to East Africa and come from the subtropical rainforests of Tanzania and Kenya. German colonial commander Walter von Saint Paul-Illaire recognized these plants in 1892 and returned to Germany with seeds. Saintpaulia became the name of the genus, although Streptocarpus, a new genus, has lately been assigned to the plants. They are not a species of violet, despite their common name, but they do have bright violet blossoms. Here is more information on these delicate plants.

In bright, indirect light, African violets flourish and produce the greatest blooms. Despite being typically easy to care for, they occasionally have fussy periods. Be not disheartened!

How to Plant African Violets

  • If the soil is well-draining, you can use an authentic African violet potting mix or an all-purpose potting soil. How to make your own blend is shown here.
  • African violets should always be grown in small pots, and every few years they should be repotted with new soil. African violets blossom more when they are somewhat constrained by their pots, so don’t be hasty to give them more room.
  • The soil should have a high organic matter content and be loose and well-drained. discover organic soil amendments.
  • African violets should not be replanted deeper than they were previously and the plant’s crown should not be buried. If kept overly damp, the stems of African violets are prone to rotting.

Watering

  • Maintain a light moisture in the soil, but watch out for overwatering because African violets’ fragile stems are highly prone to rot.
  • Use room temperature water instead of chilly water because the leaves may become marked.
  • African violets should only be watered from the bottom to prevent getting too much water on the leaves, which can rot and develop fungal patches if kept in an environment with excessive humidity.

Lighting

  • Bright, indirect light is preferred by African violets. Keep them at least a few feet away from bright south or west-facing windows and stay out of direct sunshine. The greatest illumination for them comes from a window that faces east or north without endangering the delicate leaves.
  • Artificial illumination also functions nicely. Use LED or fluorescent lamps in addition to natural lighting.
  • Leggy stems and thin, dark green leaves suggest that the plant is receiving insufficient light, while light green or bleached leaves show that it is receiving too light.

Fertilizing

  • Use a high phosphorus plant food to fertilize every two weeks during the active growing season (spring and summer). Only begin fertilizing when it looks that the plant requires an extra push (slow, thin growth; pale or yellowing leaves).
  • Since most soil mixtures already contain an abundance of nutrients, overfertilizing is an issue that occurs more frequently than underfertilizing.

General Care

  • Some kinds are more tolerant of cooler circumstances, but many prefer warm environments (65F/18C or warmer). In any event, avoid having them near drafty windows during the winter.
  • As they get bigger, plants should be moved to bigger containers, although keeping African violets slightly root-bound might help them blossom. Wilted leaves are one indication that your violet needs to be replanted.
  • The squishy leaves have a propensity to gather dirt and dust. Use a little paintbrush with sensitive bristles to gently scrub them away.

How should an African violet be cared for?

African violets prefer sunny, warm, and humid environments to grow. Avoid letting water touch the leaves as it may cause brown stains. As soon as you notice any dead foliage or blossoms, remove them to promote a stronger plant. Check the soil and plant frequently to make sure there isn’t a buildup of dead leaves. This will promote decay. It truly comes down to striking a balance when it comes to cultivating these indoor plants; you have to make sure that all of the various aspects are balanced against one another. They should be maintained in wet enough conditions to prevent drying out, while also remaining open to a cool breeze to prevent them from becoming overly stuffy and protected from direct sunshine without injuring their leaf tips. If your African violets sustain any harm, don’t give up. Everything is a step in the process.

Soil

The potting mix must be well-drained. Make sure the plant is never exposed to standing water for an extended amount of time since poor drainage can lead to root rot, which causes the plant to get soggy and lose its leaves.

Water

Aim for high humidity and keep the soil moist with warm water. A little misting of water is the only contact that should be made with the leaves to avoid damage. When watering, water from below or force the water spout into the ground. Keep the plant out of water at all times.

Where should an African violet be placed?

Because they require dry leaves, African violets are only grown indoors in North America. If you want the finest color and flowers, grow your plants in bright, indirect light. The optimal location for a plant stand is three feet away from a window that faces west or south. When placed directly next to north or east-facing windows, plants will still grow, but their leaves will be thin and spindly, and they will be less likely to flower. African violets can be grown indoors, 12 to 15 inches above the ground, under 40-watt fluorescent lights (also known as grow lights), if you don’t have a nice location near a window.

Do African violets require bottom watering?

Use only water that is room temperature because African violets are sensitive to temperature. Avoid soaking the plant’s fuzzy leaves or stem since water might get trapped there and lead to rot or fungus.

Watering an African violet plant is most effective when done from the bottom up. For 30 minutes, submerge your plant in a small tray of water and let the soil absorb the moisture through the drainage holes in the bottom of the pot. To prevent the roots from being soaked in water, let the pot drain in your kitchen sink or bathtub once the allotted time has passed. This will prevent root rot.

When 25% of the soil volume has dried out, Pangborn advises watering to maintain the soil continuously moist.

Brown Spots on Leaves

African violets should never have brown stains on them. By generating root rot, overwatering damages the root system and isolates the plant from the supply of nutrients.

If you do not provide magnesium or nitrogen, the leaves of your African violets will become discolored with brown and yellow blotches.

Edema, which is caused by the plant taking too much water, can occasionally result from overwatering. The African violet’s leaf cells are harmed by drinking too much water.

If your African violet has edema, you will observe brown, wart-like areas close to the base of the leaves.

Remove any leaves that have brown blemishes. Sadly, once brown patches form on the leaves, they are permanently damaged. Your African Violet will be able to produce new, healthy leaves more quickly if you remove them.

Root Rot And Foul Smell From Soil

If the soil does not entirely dry out between waterings or if the drainage system is not working properly, the fungus that develops will rot the roots.

Before replanting the plant, remove it from the pot and clear away any rotting dirt. Examine the stems and roots after that. To guarantee that your plants have robust, healthy roots, remove any brown or mushy ones.

After cleaning out the contaminated regions, disinfect the remaining roots by soaking them in a fungicide solution.

Your African violet has to be repotted in a fresh, well-drained bed of potting soil. (New soil is preferred, although cleaning the current soil should be sufficient if Root Rot is mild.)

Time is running out for us! Acting quickly will increase your chances of preventing root rot because it spreads swiftly.

It’s a good idea to remove any leaves that have brown patches on them. Sadly, the leaves won’t be able to recover once they start to show brown stains.

Your African Violet will have an easier time growing new, healthy leaves if you remove them.

Crown Rot

Similar to how Root Rot is identified and handled, so is Crown Rot. Where the rot has taken hold is what distinguishes them most.

Any of the roots could develop root rot, which could cause either mild or major damage. A condition called “Crown Rot” attacks the system’s top-most roots.

To treat Crown Rot, complete the Root Rot treatment procedures and apply a fungicide to the root system. Be mindful that your plant could not survive if it has severe Crown Rot.

Mold Growing on Soil

Mold in the soil is a certain indication that your African violet is receiving too much water. The top soil layer will develop moldy white specks.

Your African violet won’t be in danger from this mold (or your family). However, it is still crucial to get rid of it right away.

The mold may be completely removed if you scrape off the top layer of soil. Hydrogen peroxide mixed with a dilution can also be used to eliminate the mold.

Use five parts water to one part hydrogen peroxide. Repotting is necessary if the mold grows below the surface of the soil.

Shriveled Appearance and Mushy Stems

You are overwatering your African violet if the stems are mushy or the plant has become shriveled. A vigorous, vibrant plant will have solid stems and appear powerful and robust. When you squeeze them, if the stem gives at all, there is a problem.

A fungal infection brought on by an excess of water is indicated by mushy stems. Another indication that your African violet has perished is a shriveled appearance. In both situations, cut off the infected parts, clean the plant, and let it air dry. (Referring to Iowa State University)

Wilting

Three things can be inferred from an African violet that has withered. You are either not watering enough, watering too much, or there are bugs in your garden. Which one it is will be determined by the soil.

You are overwatering your African violet if it has wilted and the soil is moist. The African Violets can’t acquire the oxygen they require since this drowns the roots. After making any necessary repairs, let your African violet dry thoroughly.

Look for pests if your soil does not seem overly damp or dry. African violets are frequently attacked by mealybugs and cyclamen mites. Cleaning your leaves is necessary to get rid of bugs. (Source: University of Clemson)

Spraying neem oil or insecticidal soap on your leaves will smother the bugs.

If you have rubbing alcohol lying around your home, you can use it to clean each leaf of your African violet to get rid of mealybugs or cyclamen mites.

Yellow Leaves

Another indication of moisture stress from overwatering is yellow foliage. Remove any yellow leaves from your African violet plant before assessing the health of the remaining leaves.

You will need to take damage control measures if your leaves are yellow because it’s likely that your roots have rotted.

Wrinkled Leaves

Wrinkled leaves are a sign that your roots have been seriously harmed by over watering. If there are wrinkles, water cannot reach the plant tissue from the roots.

Examine your ancestry. White and hefty roots indicate good health. If your roots are mushy and brown, they must be removed. The majority of your roots may have decayed if the leaves are wrinkled.

It is worthwhile to clean and repot your roots if they are still healthy. Sadly, it is time to try again with a different African Violet if the roots all appear brown and mushy.

Curled Leaves

Overwatering is indicated by curled leaves. However, it’s also a sign that your African Violet is under stress due to the water’s temperature.

Your African violet’s roots will become chilled if you water with cold water. The leaves begin to curl downward as a result. The best water to use is at room temperature because it lessens the possibility of any temperature shock.