How To Care For An African Violet Indoors

When you learn how to produce African violets, you can add a few to your indoor spaces for a burst of vibrant color when the rest of the world is mostly brown and bare. African violets can be grown indoors with little room required; for a beautiful display, combine them in tiny pots.

For the simplest African violet care, sow the seed in the proper soil. You can buy specialized mixes or create your own by mixing equal quantities peat moss, vermiculite, and perlite.

African violet plants are particular about the water they receive, so be especially careful when watering them. water that was left to stand for 48 hours with lukewarm or tepid water. Just a drop of water can damage the leaves, so always water at the base rather than drenching it.

An essential part of learning how to grow African violets is proper irrigation. When the soil no longer feels damp to the touch, water. Never allow African violets that are growing to stand in water or to totally dry off. Although wick watering from the bottom is occasionally appropriate, it might not be the greatest technique for people just starting to produce African violets.

LightGive the African violet plant the proper amount of illumination. Filtered light of a bright to moderate intensity should be allowed to reach the developing African violet. Flowering is impacted by light. Dark green African violet plants typically require a little more light than those with pale or medium green foliage.

To prevent flowers from reaching towards the light, turn containers frequently. For optimal illumination, place African violet plants 3 feet (1 m) away from a window with a south or west face. Consider adding fluorescent lights if you can’t keep this light on for eight hours.

FertilizerFertilize African violet plants using a special food designed for them or with a food that has a greater phosphorus number—the middle number in the NPK fertilizer ratio—such as 15-30-15. Every time you water, you can use a quarter-strength mixture of fertilizer. African violets that are in growth are not receiving enough fertilizer, as seen by less flowering and poorer leaf color.

When the African violets are finished, pinch the wasted flowers. This will promote the growth of further flowers.

Try growing African violets inside now that you are aware of a few growing guidelines. Garden centers near you or online have a variety of varieties.

Where should indoor African violets be planted?

Because they require dry leaves, African violets are only grown indoors in North America. If you want the finest color and flowers, grow your plants in bright, indirect light. The optimal location for a plant stand is three feet away from a window that faces west or south. When placed directly next to north or east-facing windows, plants will still grow, but their leaves will be thin and spindly, and they will be less likely to flower. African violets can be grown indoors, 12 to 15 inches above the ground, under 40-watt fluorescent lights (also known as grow lights), if you don’t have a nice location near a window.

Are African violets sun-sensitive?

The vibrant African violet blossoms are particularly lovely. They’ll provide color right away to any space.

Even during the gloomier winter months, they have a reputation for continuing to bloom. Place them around the house so you may enjoy their vibrant hues and plush textures all year long.

Once you establish a routine for caring for African violets, you’ll discover that they expand with ease. But unless all of their fundamental requirements are satisfied, they won’t develop. Give them the proper temperature, light, and nourishment, and you’ll start to bloom right away!

How to Choose and Take Care of African Violets:

1. Start out strong. Select a plant with the desired blossom color and vivid emerald foliage. Make sure the pot has openings for drainage.

2. The ideal lighting. African violets frequently don’t blossom because they don’t receive enough light. Because direct sunlight can burn the leaves, African violets require indirect light. For optimal results, pick a window that faces north or east. Keep plants away from cold glass, and turn the container once every week to ensure that all the leaves get enough light. African violets can be grown under a grow lamp to extend the day throughout the winter.

3. Remain cozy. The most comfortable temperatures for most people are between 70 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit during the day and 65 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit at night.

4. Subsurface water. Water should be at normal temperature to fill the saucer. Pour off any extra water after letting it settle for about an hour. Between waterings, let the plant dry out completely.

5. Use the new liquid Violet from Espoma to fertilize! Every two to four weeks in the spring, summer, and fall, indoor houseplant food.

6. Be thoughtful before replanting. Only when a plant is root-bound will an African violet bloom. Use organic potting soil designed exclusively for African violets, such as Espoma’s African Violet Mix, when it comes time to repot your plants. Choose a pot that is about a third the diameter of their leaf spread in diameter because they flower best in compact pots.

How frequently should an African violet be watered?

Consider fluorescent lighting. Fluorescent lighting is the solution if you lack bright window light. I make use of four-foot lights that each have two cool white bulbs. I’ve successfully used one warm white and one cool white bulb in a fixture. unique plant bulbs, known as “A beautiful plant is also produced under grow lights. 8 to 12 inches is the ideal distance between the pot and the light.

How frequently should African violets be watered? “The most frequently asked question regarding African violets is how frequently they should be watered. The greatest indicator is to touch the surface of the soil; if it feels dry, it’s time to water. For best results, African violets should be given time to completely dry out in between waterings. An overwatered plant can die. A soggy, moist soil mass prevents air from penetrating the fine roots of an African violet, which they need. Half of your work is finished once you have learned the art of watering African violets.

Do African violets need to be watered from the top or bottom? Both are acceptable. It’s crucial to avoid using cold water; lukewarm or warm water is recommended. To prevent leaf spots, if you water from the top, take cautious not to get water on the leaves when the plant is in the sun. If you water from the bottom, you should dump any extra water once the plant has absorbed all that it requires. An African violet shouldn’t be left submerged in water for too long.

How long do indoor African violets last?

The Bay State African Violet Society claims that an African violet (Saintpaulia spp.) can live forever. With the right care, they frequently live for 50 years or beyond. The key is to keep African violets out of direct sunshine, cold, and overwatering, which can all significantly shorten their lives. Give your African violet the finest care possible, and when it stops producing new leaves, take action to resuscitate it.

How do I induce flowering in my African violet?

African violets might have poor flowering if there is insufficient light. They favor direct, bright sunlight. They strain for the light when exposed to insufficient sunlight, which results in few or no blossoms, while excessive sunshine can burn the leaves. The best window is one that faces east, especially if a sheer curtain is used to hide the sun’s worst rays.

My African violet is dying; why?

Probably the most well-known flowering house plant of all time is the African violet. They are readily available year-round, small, simple to grow, frequently bloom, and have an astonishing range of colors.

Basic Care

TEMPERATURES should ideally range from 65 to 70°F at night and be a little warmer during the day. The plant may fully collapse or the leaves will droop and curl if the temperature is too low. A plant may collapse due to excessive heat, dry, spindly growth, or withered, lifeless leaves.

Direct morning or late afternoon sunshine, extremely bright indirect LIGHT, fluorescent lighting, or grow lights are all preferred by African violets. Avoid midday sun since it might turn leaves brown. Too high light levels can result in overly compact growth, whereas low light levels make plants grow erect instead of flat and circular and with very long leaf stems. Plants should be rotated once every week to promote symmetrical development (unnecessary if light source is directly overhead). When cultivating miniature plants, fluorescent and grow lights should be placed no lower than 18 inches above the plant.

use a temperature of room When the touchable surface soil is dry, WATER. The majority of violet growers like to water from the bottom, however watering from the top is acceptable as long as you take care to keep chilly water off the leaves. Before exposing leaves to any direct sunlight, always make sure they are dry. Wicking or a “self-watering pot” are the two methods of bottom watering that perform best. If you decide to submerge the pot in water, remove any water that does not reach the root ball after 15 to 30 minutes.

You should occasionally flow water through the soil for several minutes, whether you top- or bottom-water. This will flush out any salts that may have accumulated from tap water or fertilizers. The most frequent cause of African violet death is overwatering. Too much water can cause plants to become limp, lose their leaves or flowers, and develop crown and stem rot. Lack of irrigation results in the plant losing strength and color, the roots shriveling and dying, and finally the plant collapsing.

African violets can endure indoor humidity that ranges from 40 to 60 percent. If your home is excessively dry, spritz your violets every day with room-temperature water, but never at night or in the middle of the day. Placing your violets on a tray with pebbles and maintaining water in the tray at a level slightly below the surface of the stones is another method to battle dry air.

Every time you water, apply a diluted, balanced FERTILIZER. The majority of African violets are fed often and grown in soilless potting mixtures. Be careful to dilute the fertilizer more than the amount suggested on the package (often 1/4 strength will do), unless the fertilizer is specifically created to be used with every watering. Violets won’t flower well if they aren’t regularly fed. An overabundance of fertilizer can burn the plant, resulting in dark leaf margins and tips. The majority of violet fertilizers contain phosphorus (P), the center of the three numbers on the label, in their formula (e.g., 15-30-15).

Remove wasted blooms and dead leaves to groom your African violets. Washing leaves every now and again with just warm water and blotting them dry. Violets have leaves with hairs that attract dust. Between baths, clean up the leaves with a gentle brush. Your violets’ symmetrical shape can be maintained by removing suckersplantlets.

Regularly check for PESTS and disease. African violets are prone to powdery mildew, a fungus that appears on leaves and blossoms as fine, white talcum powder. This issue might be avoided by providing plants with adequate air circulation. Two insects that typically affect violets are mealybug and thrips. On stems and leaves (top or bottom), mealybug appears as white, cottony spots. Thrips can be identified by their dark blossom margins, bent leaves, and pollen trails on petals. Affected plants should be isolated and treated as necessary. Your violets will grow healthier and be less prone to pests and diseases if you take good care of them.

LEAF CUTTINGS ARE USUALLY USED FOR PROPAGATION. Cut the stem of a good leaf to about 1/2 inch. Insert the stem into the cutting mixture while keeping the humidity level higher. New plants grow near the leaf’s base. Additionally, violets can be produced from seed and the leaf can be rooted in water.

Maintenance

To keep your violet looking good and to give it new growing material, REPOT it once or twice a year. African violets lose their lower, older leaves as they develop. This process results in the formation of the “neck,” a naked stem that is unattractive and increases the plant’s susceptibility to disease. You may maintain the lovely, rosette-growing habit that a newly purchased violet possesses by repotting.

Remove your violet from the pot and take off a piece of dirt from the bottom of the root ball that is roughly equal to the length of the neck if it hasn’t yet grown a very long neck. Replant the plant in its container and cover the exposed root ball’s neck with fresh medium. The neck will send out new roots into the media.

It is better to cut the stem and root the leafy part of a plant if the neck has been allowed to grow long and curved. A new root system will develop when this short stem is placed into brand-new potting soil. Till fresh growth indicates the emergence of strong new roots, keep the potting soil moist but not waterlogged. Trailing violets should be allowed to sucker and trail freely because they do not preserve a symmetrical rosette shape. A trailer can be pruned and new plants can be established from the stem cuttings if it loses too many leaves and starts to look unappealing. When allowed to spread in the pot, little violets prefer to grow freely and retain their attractiveness.

Violets should not be over-potted. Standard African violets thrive in pots with a 4 diameter and require only periodic repottings to maintain the proper neck length. Small violets grow best in three pots. For violets to blossom, the pots must be gently constrained. Flowers that are in bud or bloom may drop off or fade fast if they are replanted, as even careful transplanting stresses the root system.

Can you grow African violets in the bathroom?

  • 1. Loose, permeable soil African violets must be planted in soil that doesn’t become moist since they are extremely sensitive to wet feet and roots that are left in excessive water. A container with sufficient drainage is required. Maintaining a slightly damp soil is a fundamental regulation.
  • 2. Minimal humidity. African violets’ fuzzy leaves must be dry in order to prevent decay. African violets should not be grown in high-humidity areas like bathrooms or kitchens since they prefer dry environments like home offices or living rooms.
  • 3. Light with filters. In order to ensure that they receive enough light to blossom, African violets should be placed next to an indoor grow light or a few feet from a window that faces west or south.
  • 4. Warm conditions. African violets like temperatures of at least 65 degrees Fahrenheit and higher, and dislike drafty windows, winter months, chilly air, or even cold water on their roots.

Do African violets benefit from coffee grounds?

If the pH of the African violet soil is too high, some people advise adding vinegar to decrease it. Instead of adding vinegar to the soil, it is preferable to start with soil that has the right pH for your African violet plants.

African violets require soil with a pH between 5.8 and 6.2, despite the fact that vinegar is an acid and they prefer acidic soil. The pH of vinegar is about 2.5. African violets may be unable to access essential nutrients from too-acidic soil.

To gradually lower the pH level of the potting mix, you can water your African violets with diluted vinegar (one or two teaspoons of vinegar per gallon of water). But since it takes so long, you might as well start with the right soil as you have to repot every six months with new soil.

Nitrogen and a small acidity in coffee grounds aid in the growth of healthy foliage in plants. It may be beneficial for the plant if you occasionally sprinkle used coffee grounds on top of the potting soil for your African violet. But don’t go overboard. It only needs a quick dusting every few months. Coffee grounds generally won’t make much of a difference if you already use a balanced fertilizer on a regular basis.

Instead of applying used coffee grounds on African violets, I would suggest adding them to your compost pile for outdoor plants. Whenever I try to dust used coffee grounds on interior plants, it always ends up being filthy.

Use potting soil specifically designed for African violets. Because regular houseplant potting soil is excessively dense, your African violets will experience root rot problems. Additionally, it’s possible that the soil won’t be acidic enough for African violets.

You may either purchase commercial African violet potting soil or make your own homemade version.

African violet potting mix can be used for various indoor plants that require light, acidic soil. That sort of mixture would work nicely for some cactus and succulents. Although some other common houseplants may thrive with African violet potting soil, most people don’t give it a try because it is usually more expensive than standard potting soil.